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February 22, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TtTE~DYF£'E. tit, 193

I - -- -- .

New, Process Anni Arbor Trades Council Backs
Fo1 Fcsmie Printers In. Local Press Strili
Lised At Li1rary (Continued from page 1) i*t- of Macnri gan, and all local uni(
I ~~iffiiated with the Arnn Arbor
4feap M-1 ofilr Method Art.*r'Trade,- and Libor Counicil, and .tci T. 3; r Council"
- r^ hsivsiainhGDei*clared Most Valu.able eJ onluivey that hours of la- hn z:serear
ll -o ic Pitn o a~s elhad aiaycf Unanimously adol ted Feb. 21, 193E
Microfilm reproductions of rare such as to bring discredit to this corn-
books and manuscripts in the pos- mnunity and its citizens because of Need S u e t
session of the University Library will the numerous violations of State anid ~lU 1
son be made available through the Federal laws, therefore be it
efforts of Dr. William W. Bishop, hi- Resrived, that the Ann Arbor In Social W ~or
brarian,E and Eugene B. Power of Trades and Labor Council, in special
Anni Arbor, it was announced re- meeting assembled this 21st dlay of
eently. February, 1938, request that all State Student Religious Gros
Thiis service will prove especially authorities responsible for the pay-g
valuable in giving scholars access to ment of funds which are to be used Wants Voliinteers
rare~ book material according to Dr. n paying for printing produced by
Bishiop who added that "the use of the Ann. Arbor Press, including that Student volunteers to carry on
microfilms will revolutionize the stor- :which is paid for through the Uni- cial service work in Ann Arbor
4ke of historic records." versity of Michigan, be immediately needed by seven organizations,
.Microfilms have come into prom- petitioned through this resolution, to cording to a survey recently comp]
Thnence as a means of reproducing a refuse the approval of any further ed by the Student Religious Assoc
small number of manuscript copies expenditure of funds for this purpose tion.,
and, rare books at extremely low cost. until such time as the Ann Arbor Press Requests have been submitted
The photographic work will be done mneets the conditions of the printing the Association for students to 1
by Mr. Power, a Michigan alumnus, industry prevalent in this locality boys' and girls' clubs for the YM~
Vho will use a Graflex camera and 35 and agrees to meet with the bonafide and. YWCA, to act as masters
mmn. film. representatives of its employees in Boy Scout troops and to help
S"An important official of the Car- accordance with the laws of Mich- County Agent in probation work.
4egie ]Foundation," Mr. Power said, igan and of the United States. The Family Welfare Bureau ne
"!recently declared that 'the invcen- Be it fuxrther resolved, that a copy help in making inventories of f+
tion of microfilm technique offers of this resolution be sent to Norman and clothing, and the Dunbar Cc
mjore for scholarship than any other! Hill, executive secretary to Governor munity House has asked for
contribution since the invention of Murphy; Mr. Belanger, Secretary of ganizers to aid in establishing cir
printing.' "I the Board of State Auditors; Mr. W'oe- The Boys' Guidance group, wh
Microfilms will reproduce entireI ber, Secretary of the State Adminis- deals with delinquency cases fx
books at a cost much less than similar trative Board; Harold D. Smith, Bud- the Michigan Fresh Air Camp, ne
photostatic work. get Director; President Ruthven and students who can help with lhar
A the Board of Regents of the Univer- craft work.

Lines Drawn
~cc For New' War

fornia and other educational plans
Pottey Diplay that reject compulsory class attend-
Potr ,ipa ance, final examinations and grades,
0 men ThsW ~eek uhe President pointed out that these
_______feauresai rellysuperfiial ;2ints
feuatrsnoeii-
Collectio iOf Pew alArtn ieykii
i Ai fe tuiir av .h~io1 t i3Jn (fry e ai hrght.if they afe

Ions
So-
are
ac-
)let-
Sto
lead
ACA
for
the
~es
food
or -
lubs.
hich
'omn
~es
ndi-

((' Oflt~illiutd fTQro 'i ri =i
Impose- -and de°sjw itesperficial d fa-
"erences, both sides seek only to main-
ain the smug complacency and aim-
erial possessions of Empire.
Both Eden and Chamberlain would
prefer the victory of the Spanish fas-.
~ists over the Loyalist forces. But
ESden would prefer the fiction of Ital-
'an "withdrawn)" of "volunteers" and
t. Pranco victory "unassisted," fight-
ing a hard bargain to limit Italian
;restige. Charnh( latin and the other
'land seeks a solidlRalian agreement
ito weaken the Rome-Berlin axis and
temper Ger man demands for colonies.
Neither cares particularly for the fate
of Central Europe except as the ex-
oansion of Germany threatens Brit-
ish supremacy. Neither would de-
fend the Soviet. Union against the
Nazi threat to the Ukraine.
Superimposed .on the cnftire ciis i
the shadow of German military Wright,
the rolling wave of gray-green uni-
forms expyanding irresistibly in every
direction. Czechoslovakia is the next
danger point, and after that: the
Ukraine. It would take a strongly tini-
fied France linked to a dominant Rus-
sia ,unhampered by the Far Eastern
war, and supported by a labor gov-
ernment in Britain to establish a bal-
ance in Europe. A balance to be solid -
ified eventually by economic conces-
lions given voluntarily by the '"haves"
and not siezed at the point of the bay-
onet by the "have not s."
The endless jockeying necessitated
by the Political situation in England
and France and the unknown strengoth
of the Soviet Union can, in the face
of an aggr~essive and daring German-,
tiv ut one result. War. And that
war in the not too distant fut'tire.

Ail 0-x; djuh t. u ewOfpo es~x
be on display this week and next in
the central show cases of the first
floor of the Architecture Building,
Pewabic pottery is the work of a
grouap of artists led by Mrs. Mary
Chase Stratton of Detroit, who is con-,
sidered the foremost worker in cer-'
anics in the "United States. It is im-
portant to art collectors and the cer-
amics field, because of the contribu-'
tions to the development of glazes
and other effects which have been
achieved in it. The exhibit to be
shown consists of a collection recently
given the University by Dr. Wttalter
Parker in memory of his wife, Mrs.
Margaret Watson Parker. Ms.
Mrs. Stratton is a member of the'
faculty of the College of Architec-
ture under the title of visiting pro-
I fessor. She has worked in other fields
'of art as well as ceramics, having done
Iwork in the Detroit Institute of Art
and the Detroit Public Library. She
has worked on other projects withE
prominent architects such as Cass
Gilbert, H~all Crat, and Ralph Adams,
1(11 ii nDe nounc)l Ies.
Special iZCd Coiurse4C
(Contirnued from Page 1)!
Without arriving at too much spe-
cialization."
Reaf irming that it is un to the
kiniversities and colleges to preserve
democracy, President Ruthven
stressed the imp~ortance of teaching
7tudents to think for themselves.
,They should not become mere prac-
titioners," he said.
r Commltil -on the Chicago, Cali-

a. :, ey tY~itl be re te l," he said,

FOR READING ENJOYMENT... A MODERN
byour

SAILORS' 8-HOUR DAY
IWASHINGTON, Feb. 21.--(I1)--Of-
ficers and men on American tugs op-
era ting on the Great Lakes and in all
American fresh water connecting
with them would have "an eight-hour
u iiing day under a bill introduced
today by Representative_ Head (Dera.-
N Y.) Tugfs i~ u se exclusively tor flStL
og purposes woutll be icede.

WtiiASHfl'N'TON, Feb. 2 -?~-h
Agricultural Adjustment Adminis-
t4ation announced today rejection of
ai pr'opo~ed marketing agreement pro-
qamn for onion sets produced in the
lower Take Michigan area. Officials
said the agreement, submitted by
growers and shippers of onion sets,
failed tAo receive approval of two-
thirds of the growers affected in Il.-
1tnois,. Indiana and Wisconsin.

ri

l

DAILY OFFICI
!? ublcatin in the Bulletin is cones
University. Copy received at the of (
u tntlil2.30; 11:00 a.m. on Saturday

IALBULLETIN
- triictive notice to all memb~ers of the
loe of the Assistant to the President
leave from in front of the Union at,
3 :30 o'clock. All members of the club!h

Just 23 inches high, this new e-ndtab~le
lamp is designed to fill the need P r a
shorter table lamp witl out sarisielug any
of' the qualities of god lighting for which
the reflector-bowl lamps are rioted. Small
as it is, this new lamp asks no favors or
concessions: It provides plenty of' light for
easy, comfortable seeing ... room-wale
light witiroiit harsh shadows or sharl) covi-
tr acts. Place one of these lamps beside yorr
favorite easy chair: You'll enjoy your book
or :newspaper much more!
See the new floor and table lamps on display at

" I

_,

(Continued from Page 4)

-1

men have been selected for the Sagi-
naw trip Wednesday. The bus will

'Fs o0
w i°KUM
apsnarr

i

7

This Is Your Bank

I

THIS IS YOUR BANKA, the institution that your support
has built. Arid it is your bank in another sense, for it has
been planned for your convenience.
SAVINGS PLANS -- filling the needs of all kinds of
clients. Checking accounts -- embodying extra safety and
convenience. Safety deposit vaults--providing protection for
secijritfes,. certificates and jewelry. Come in and learn more
about the services designed for you.
Ann Aro r Savings
&Commrercia Bank.
Southeast Corner NICKEL'S ARCADE
of Main and Huron at State Street'

f

_ _ _ _

rl

who did not make the Buffalo trip!-
report for rehearsal at 4:30 today. WlSCONSIN ENROLLMENT UP
Secrist, Clark IMADISON 'Wis.-Enrolment fig-
Miller Gillis ures for the second semester at the
Fennell Anderson Uiversity of Wisconsin reveal an
Holt Harding. increase of . 913 for a total of ap-
Macintosh Sklarskcy proximately x40,500 students, it wash
E. Vandenberg Kent announced yeteday.
Tyrrell Stitt
Ossewaarde Yaman
M cLaughlin Karpus';4;:>;:<:>:: <:<:; ;::: ::<>:.:;::;"::::
Collins Purdy :............::.>..
Draper Fromm
Swann Kamm
Meek RoachE
Brooks Brown Is>;s '
Tuttle Yergens
R. Vandenberg Viehe
Moore Dunks
McKinley Cannon
Trebilcock Jacobson
Dramia Group: AAUW, Junior Divi-
ion will meet at the home of Kath-
erine Kempfer and Dorothy Seifer- C{<
loin, 820 E. Ann Street, who will be {
the joint hostesses. Miss Ruth Cas-' <
well will have charge of the program.r
ft will be held at 8 o'clock Wednesday I' r
evening, Feb. 23.j':
Inter- Guild Morning Watch: Alll
Protestant students are welcome atIy"
the Inter-Guild Devotion Service , ?
which is held at the League Chapel :>
each Wednesday morning at 7:30
a.m. The Service this week is under
the auspices of the Episcopal Stu-
dent Guild. _ _j
Iota Alpha: The Beta Chapter of Swh
Iota Alpha will hold its regular
monthly meeting on Wednesday, Feb tan
23, at 7:30 p.m. in the Seminar Room qi
'3205) East Engineering Buildingqi
The speaker of the evening will be;
Mr. C. W. Clapp, who has chosen for <
his subject "The Acoustic Strobo-
scope." (Please note the change ofW
night from Thursday, Feb. 24, to
Wednesday, Feb. 23).
Scabbard and Blade: There will be
an important meeting of Scabbard
and Blade at R.O.T.C. Headquar-'c m
ter's Wednesday evening, Feb. 23 at
7:30 p.m.
organization meeting for the second A
semester in Room 348 West Engineer- u itA
ing Bldg. at 7:30 Wednesdy e.23Ao O
Flying groups for the second semes- H-unt, wh viewed
ter' will be formed. All who are in- mlatheks as adip
terested are invited. No previous fly- Ellen~harles.lie P
ing experience is necessary. new golf meteor ont
Sphin andTriagle ill oldI and let her sizzle.
jointet meeting at noon tomorrows in Husnt'satke oill
the Union. All membersofbtor Ellen, however, k
gnztosare urged to be present i to play a b)eterr
for important business will be dis-',
cuassed.Ine('7i
1[reshian and Sophomore Engineers 1{OK t
All those interested in trying out for
the Michigan Technic are requested
to' attend the first regular tryout
meeting Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 5 p.m.dsuf
in Room 3046, East Engineering .Bldg. A DAmrl
Intramural Bowling-Women' Stu- blyn
dents: Team entries are to be handed nearly ruined ti
iat Barbour Gymnasium by Wed- Edward Shento
nesday, Feb. 23. Tournament be- CATCH CROOK
gins on Thursday, Feb. 24. sleuths, or are
k with waxd'I

,r

D)ANCIJNG
Glss & individual lu~-
ci i'uctiofl in all types
A dancing, Teachersi'
c:ourse. Open daily 10
n' M. to 10 P.M,
johone 9695 2nd Floor
TIerr'ae (arden Studic
Wiierth TheIatre Bldg

DEPARTMENT STORES, FUG YJ[*'LIRE
HARDWARE STORES AND EmiCC7 iCAL

i

ib tllll a11 a v

STORES,
DEALERS

i

THE UNIVERSITY OF

MICHIGAN

Presents
Savad or de Madlari aga
Chief of the disarmament section of the League
of Nations and formerly Spain's ambassador to
the United States and France.
Speaking on.
WHAT IS PEACE?
Thrsday Feb. 24f
Q.1 C -D X1

Fur Coats

I

I K

.;,

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