100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 05, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Stein Influence
On Goethe Seen
Extensive Correspondence
Disclosed By Fairley
The complete influence of Charlotte
Von Stein over Goethe during a 10-
year period of his life was disclosed
by Prof. Barker Fairley of the Univer-
sity of Toronto in a University lec-
ture given here yesterday.
Professor Fairley, who is considered
one of the world's greatest Goethe
scholars, has writtenseveral books
on Goethe which have entirely
changed the concept of that poet in
the English speaking world.
Frau von Stein's influence began
with Goethe's arrival in Weimar in
1775 and ended with his trip to Italy
in 1786, although the two continued
corresponding until 1826, according
to Professor Fairley. Seventeen hun-
dred of Goethe's letters to her, which
have been preserved, show the spon-
taneity and inspiration of this period.
Frau von Stein, however, retrieved
and destroyed all her letters.
Goethe, in going to Weimar, was
-trying to find some discipiine after
his freedom at Frankfort and this
was furnished by Frau von Stein who,
seven years his senior, became his
apppointed guide of an ordered life,
Professor Fairley said. She filled the
gap in his spiritual life before his
maturity.
/ The poetry written between 1775
and 1780 constitutes the second pe-
riod of Goethe's life and is distin-
guished from the rest by the absence
of all radical elements, he continued.
"Iphigenia" was cited as an example
of this period.
A.A.U.W. LECTURE
Announcement of the last lecture
in the travel series of the Junior
A.A.U.W. travel group was made by
Susan Manchester, chairman. The
meeting 'Will be held at 8 p.m. today
in the Chamber of Commerce.

Languages Suffer
Cut In Enrollment
The Department of Romance Lan-
guages has suffered a general enroll-
ment decrease this year, a compari-
son of enrollment figures for the last
two years revealed.
Recent compilations show decreases
of 6 per cent and 4 per cent between
the first semesters and second semes-
ters respectively. Due to the larger
enrollment in the fall than in the
spring, the degree of increase or de-
crease is more marked in the fall.
Morestudents are taking "Spanish
this year than last, but the French
and the Italian departments report
smaller classes. This year, there is a
special reason for the lack of popular-
ity of the French department. The
University's new entrance pxamina-
tion requirements have discouraged
incoming freshmen from continuing
here a two year high school course
in a foreign language.
In summer school, the Spanish de-
partment reports smaller classes,
while the French and Italian de-
partments have stable enrollments.
Although there are still many under-
graduate courses offered in summer
schools, there is an increasing amount
of graduate work being done during
that session.
College Romance Language studies
are reported decreasing in popularity'
throughout the country. This is at-
tributed to the fact that vocational
studies are gradually crowding mod-
ern foreign languages out of high
school curricula.
Micligras Chairmen
To Meet Tomorrow"
All chairmen of committees work-
ing on booths for the Michigras are
asked to be at Yost Field House be-
tween 4:30 and 5:30 tomorrow to re-
ceive the prizes they are to distribute.-
All persons working on booths are
notified that they must be finished
and outside the Field House by 6:00.
Tney may return at 7:00 for final
arrangements.

DAILY OFFICIALI
BULLETIN
THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1938
VOL. XLVIII. No. 153
Modification of Rules Governing
Participation in Public Activities. Ef-
fective September 1938.
I.
Participation in Public Activities:
Participation in a public activity is
defined as service of any kind on a
committee or a publication, in a public
performance or a rehearsal, or 'in
holding office or being a candidate
for office in a class or other student
organization. This list is not intended
to be exhaustive, but merely is indica-
tive of the character and scope of the
activities included.
II.
Certificate of Eligibility. At the be-
ginning of each semester and summer
session every student shall be con-
clusively presumed to be ineligible for
any public activity until his eligibility
is affirmatively established (a) by
obtaining from the Chairman of the
Committee on Student Affairs, in the
Office of the Dean of Students, a writ-
ten Certificate of Eligibility. Partici-
pation before the opening of the first
semester must be approved as at any
other time.
Before permitting any students to
participate in a public activity (see
definition of Participation above),
the chairman or manager of such
activity shall (a) require each appli-
cant to present a certificate of eligibil-
ity, (b) sign his initials on the back
of such certificate and (c) file with
the Chairman of the Committee on
Student Affairs the names of all those
who have presented certificates of
eligibility and a signed statement to
exclude all others from participation.
Certificates of Eligibility for the
first semester shall be effective until
March 1. '
III.
Probation and Warning. Students
on probation or the warned list are
forbidden to participate in any public
activity.
V.c
Eligibility, First Year. No freshman
in his first semester of residence may
be granted a Certificate of Eligibility.
A freshman, during his second se-
mester of residence, may be granted a
Certificate of Eligibility provided he
has complete 15 hours or more of work
with (1) at least one mark of A or B
and with no mark of less than C, or
(2) at least 21/2 times as many honor
points as hours and with no mark of
(Continued on Page 4)

Bruised Student"Body' Reported
By Health Service Physicians

Student Senate Supports
Camp Tag Day Appeal
Following action by the League
Council to make the University Fresh
Air Camp Tag Day on May 13 an
official women's project, the Student
Senate Tuesday night joined forces
with those campus organizations

which are supporting the Tag Day by
voting to "wholeheartedly support"
the drive.
The main purpose of the action
by the Senate ,was to present, as
forum and semi-official expression
of student opinion, its support of
the coming campus drive. No action
beyond the resolution of active sup-
port was outlined.

The advent of summer sports has
resulted in numerous sprains and
abrasions during the past week, Dr.
William M. Brace of the Health Serv-
ice said yesterday.
Outdoor activity has also resulted
in numerous colds and sore muscles
in the past two days, Dr. Brace said.
Only one case of German measles
has been reported, according to-Dr.
Brace, indicating that the epidemic
of contagious diseases which was pre-
valent in April has now passed.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director
of the :Health Service, yesterday
warned against long exposure to the
rays of the sun. Dr. Forsythe recom-
mended a good, strong tan as health-
ful, but advised that the tan be ac-
quired slowly.
II
iI

Poison ivy will be causing many
students discomfort before long, Dr.
Forsythe prophesied, and he suggest-
ed that hikers and walkers be care-
ful to avoid it. Persons sensitive to
pollen from trees also should exer-
cise caution, Dr. Forsythe advised.
Students who 'get blisters while
playing ball or walking should leave
them unopened as long as possible,
he said, and he suggests that if they
are accidently opened they should be
tern wide open in order to avoid in-
fection.
DRUIDS TO MEET TODAY
Druids will hold an important lun-
cheon meeting at 12:15 p.m. today in
the Union. Plans for Michigras will
be discussed.

USED BOOK CARNIVAL
(Sponsored by the University of Michigan Alumnae)
ALL TYPES OF BOOKS AND
MAGAZINES AS LOW AS ..'. ic
Thursday, May 5 - Friday, May 6
9 A.M. - 6 P.M.
MuniciptDal M arket Place
Fifth Avenue at Detroit Street

ii

THE FIR'
OF MAR
THE iHAI
Ariot-call:
love-and-la

YEARS
IFE ARE
rhat fund
thearts! The
of the year!

NEXT SUNDAY
A Day No Son or Daughter So Forget
AppreciatedGift Sugges

11

.

j.

I I

* GUERLAIN'S "Shalimar"
" LANVIN'S "My Sin"
LELONG'S "IndIiscret"
CORDAY'S "Orchidee Bleue"
* DEVILBISS' Ato~nizers
* YARDLEY'S "Bond Street"

* CORDAY" S"Tourjois Moi"
* CHANEL'S "Gardenia"
* HOUBIGANT'S "Eau Florale"
* LELONG'S "Improiptu"
S LANVIN'S "Scandal"
i YARDLEY'S Lavender"

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

WJR
P.M.'
6:00-Stevenson Sports.
6 :15-Musical.
6:30-We, the People.
7:00-Kate Smith Hour.
8 :00--Mayor Bowes.
9:00-Essays in Music.
9:30-Americans at Work.
10:00-Just Entertainment.
10:15-Hollywood Screenscoops.
10 :30-Baseball Scores.
10 :35-Mareau de Salon.
11:00-News-Jack King.
11 :15-vMdtation.
11:30-Frank Dailey's Orch.
WWJ
P.M.
6:00-Tyson's Sport Review.
6:10-Recordings,
6:15-Little Orphan Annie.
6:30-Bradcast.
6:40-It Might Happen To You.
6:45--Sport Review.
7:00-Rudy Vallee.
8:00-Good News of 1938.
9:00-Kraft Music Hall.
10:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
10:15-Musical Moments.
10:30-House Party.
11:00-Newscast.
11:10-Webster Hal Orch.
11:30-Hotel Statler Orch.
12 :00-Studio Feature.

CKLW
P.M.
6:00-Wheel of Chance.
6:30-Perry Como.
6:45-Isham Jones Orch.
7 :00-Sinfonietta.
7:300BC Summer Theatre.
8:00-Symphony.
9 :00--"Lobbies."
9:30-Henry Weber's Concert.
10 :15-Theatre Digest.C
10:45-Dick Barrie's Qrch.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
1ii:i-Dance Orch.
12:00-Jan Garber's O ch.
12:30-Anson Weeks' Orch.
1:00-The Dawn Patrol.
WXYZ
P.M.
6:00-Easy Aces.
6:15-Mr. Keen.
6:30-The Green Hor'iet.
7:00-March of Time.
7:30--Jimmy Kemper & Co.
7:45-Sheifter & Brenner.
8:00-University of Rochester.
8:30-Black :Flame.
8:45-Webster Hall Orch.
s 9:00-Lowry Clark's Orch.
9:30-Donald Novis Sings.
9:45-Promenade Concert.
10:00--Eddie LeBarron Orch.
10:15-Elza Schallert Orch.
10:30--Enrique Madriguerra Orch.
11:00-Harry Owen's Orch.
11:30--Garwood an's Orch.
12:00-Ray Gorrell Orch.

* GILBERT'S FINE

CHOCOL~ATES

11

U""'
s vL

0 PRIMROSE WEEK-END BAG

! 4 )
k 1 61

ALL GIFTS WRAPPED FOR MAILING OR PRESENTATION
CAMPUS CUT-RATE DRUGS

t

F

Sith''WnPlc
WA R RE N I L L IA M
BIN N IE 3A R NE S
ALAN DI 4EHART
r rantland
fete Rice's
Smith's Win, Place
"Three On or Show'
A Rope""Rhytim
Paramount Saves the
News the Day

218 South State Street

"Ann Arbor's Busiest Little Drug Store"

A

Next to Goldman's

a

Tel. 9392

Classified Directory
-

FOR SALE
WASHED SAND and Gravel. Drive-
way Gravel. Killins Gravel Co.
Phone 7112. 7x
NOTICES
NOTICE: Princeton beer jackets and
hats with Michigan seal. Natural
or M colors. Lowest prices. Call
2-3596 evenings. 504
VIOLA STEIN, 706 Oakland. Phone
6327. Experienced typist. Reason-
able rates. 232
TYPING: Experienced. Reasonable
rates. L. M. Heywood; 803 E. King-
sley St. Phone 8344. lox
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any

old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
Inents. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
FOR RENT: Summer or school-year.
4 room furnished apartments. Frig-
idaire, laundry. Phone 3403, Os-
borne, 209 N. Ingalls. 511
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Alpha Chi Omega sorority pin
somewhere between Union and 1004
Olivia. Reward. Phone 3718.
517
LOST: Black and white Parker foun-
tain pen .Reward. Dial 2-3420.

Watch

for

it

in

l

your mail!!

i

I

., ,

I

4

BE AMONG

11FF

=

11

"THOSE PRESENT"

During the next day or two the MICHIGAN DAILY
will begin distributing through the mails a q'uestionnaire
designed for students and faculty members to answer,
This marks the first organized attempt in many years to
determine what, how, and where students live and pur-
chase their daily needs. It is an attempt, first of all, to
organize into accurate data the typical student budget for
the purpose of informing to a better degree the future
students of the University. Secondly, the survey is an effort
to increase the service of the DAILY to its advertisers, so
that they may serve you more intelligently with a keener
eye to your needs and desires.

when the 1938

III

FNSIAN
Is Distributed !

11

HELP US and HELP YOURSELVES by

I

filling out your

Place your order with our
salesmen on campus

F

X\ATOT-JTG;A NT

T~IV

ul

i

III II1111

Jill

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan