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April 24, 1938 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-04-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY U P

4,1938

Nino Martini Is Star Of Radio,.

Opera Cinema, Concert Stage

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(Continued from Page 9)
of yore this- suave Italian. is nick-
named "The Metropolitan Adonis,
and, -adm-its, ruefully, that his dear
public often makes impossible de-
mands. He receives no end of requests
for locks of his hair; numerous tender
letters from mothers asking for pic-
tures of "Baby Nino;" the prize, how-
ever, was a request -to sing "" Filet
Sole Mio," -.which seemed too fishy
and was dropped to the bottom of a
sea of mail.
Peering into his private life, we find
Martni as much at ease on a horse
as on a. aoncert platform. He claims
that the old Bohemian adage of wine,
women and song, however, doesn't
mix and he, of course, has chosen
song. His way of relaxing is novel;-
he shifts his nerves into neutral by
seelting the most thrilling wild west
picture in town, and pocketing his
fame, he-shouts with the excited chil-
dren who usually attend such shows.
He made his debut in opera as -the
arrdgant Duke in Verdi's tragedy -of

love and fickleness, "Rigoletto." Late-
ly he has been lending his velvet voice
and charm to such roles as Ruggiero
in "La Rondine," Rudolfo in "La
Bohehe;" and will include some selec-'
tions from "Tosca" in his program
here.
Martini, who claims that movies
have ┬░given hisf personality a new
freedom and swing now has his third
picture, "Music For Madame" behind
him. This production is said to sur-
pass his previous features and has
become an: international hit. He is
one cof: the few artists of modern
times who have so adequately mnet the
demands of four such widely diver-
gent fields - opera, concert, radio,
and motion pictures.
Musical moments withgMartini are
precious experiences in the realm qf
music.
Nino Marini's art creates magnifi-
cent tone-paintings and masterpieces
of vocal sculpture. Auditoriums are
packed to the rafters and stages are
so crowded with seats that there is
hardly adequate space for Martini to

1938 Program
I One Of Note
Sink Praises Local Public
For Its Support In Past
By CHARLES A. SINK
(President of the School of Music)
Brilliant -substantial programs, in-
terpreted by artists and organizations
of outstanding reputation, will char-
acterize the six programs of the
Forty-Fifth Annual May Festival of
the University of Michigan to be held
May 11, 12, 13 and 14, 1938. Seven.
leading celebrities of the Metropolitan
Opera Association and other singers
of note, as well as instrumentalists of-
renown will participate in the solo
roles. The Philadelphia Orchestra
will be heard in all six concerts.
It is a significant fact that for
forty-five years the Festival has con-
tinued without interruption. Panic,
wars, depressions and recessions,
while injecting numerous problems
difficult of solution, have not cur-
tailed the artistic effectiveness of
the event. This has been due in
large measure to a sympathetic and
loyal public, which has ever care-
fully guided the prestige of Michigan's
gala musical event. Through the years
this public has continued to support
the activities of the University Mus-
sical Society in a sympathetic and
constructive manner. Such suppor-t
and evidences of loyalty have ever
served as encouragement to the So-
ciety to maintain standards set on a
high plane, both in respect to per-
formers engaged and in the selection
of musical compositions to be proc.
vided.

Ii - y

ARTHUR 'HACKETT
Noted Tenor

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ARTHUR HACKETT, Professor

of

Voice of the Music School and well known
tenior, will- sing the solo part in Rachman-
inoff's "Silver Bells" in the second concert,
Thursday everiing. In .recitals and in ora-
torio, as well as in operatic forms, he is al-
ways master of every situation, and his off-
erings are high spots in any- program in
which he appears.
Thursday Evening, May 12

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THE 1938 MAY FESTIVAL
presents
A Galaxy of Musical Stars
in

tand when this lyric tenor of the
Aetropolitan Opera Company fulfills
is concert tours from coast to coast.
His appearances - everywhere -
reate scenes of enthusiasm seldom
witnessed. With his God-given voice,
Martini flings open the doors of the
oyal road to romance and gives full
ein to his listeners' most high-spir-
ted moods.
With artistic finesse he selects each

audience's song of songs, and com-
municates to them its innermost
sweetness.
PROGRAMS MAY BE CHANGED
The music school reserves the right
to make such changes in the pro-
grams or in the personnel of partici-
pants as necessity may require, ac-
cording to President Charles A. Sink.

NINO-MARTINI

Wagner Mu si
More Poular,
McGeoch Says
(Continued From Page 9),
"Entrance of the Gods into Wal-
halla," to be played by the Philadel-
phia symphony.
"Du Bist Der Lenz" which is Sieg-
linda's reply to her lover Sigmund
end "Wotan's farewell and the Magic
Fire Music" will be the orchestral se-
lections from the first movement of
the trilogy, while Miss Lawrence will
sing "Hoi Yo To Ho Te," Brunn-
hilde's battle cry, also from the first
of the trilogy.
The symphony will present "Wald #
Weben," a musical picturization of l
the forest and "Siegfried Ascending
the Mountain to meet Brunnhilde;
and finale" from the second work of.
the trilogy. Miss Lawrence will sing
the "Immolation and Closing Scene"
from "Gotterdammerung," and the
symphony will present the "Rhine
Journey of Siegfried" and "Siegfried's
Funeral March" from the same work.
Critic Praises The Ring
Lawrence Gilman, annotator of
program notes for the Philadelphia
Symphony and, -according to Profes-
sor McGeoch, "the most renowned
Wagnerian critic in America today,"
has said of the .Ring," "The themes
of the 'Ring' have almost the char-
aeter of everlasting things; one fan-
cies that they have: always been -
that Wagner simply came upon them,
ageless, completely shaped, un-
changeable in power and expressive-
ness, at some turning in his creative
path."
Miss Lawrence, who made her
American debut in the Metropolitan
in 1935 in the role ,.of "Brun nbide, " isl
widely known in Europe for her work'
with the Monte Carlo Opera and the
Paris Opera, with which she 'sang
three successive seasons after her
.operatic debut as Elizabeth in."Tann-
hauser" in 1932.
Engaged For. The Met
When ,Edward Johnson;, manager9
of the Metropolitan, heard the Aus-
tralian sheep rancher~s daughter in!
1935, he immediately engaged her
and today, at 28, she ranks as one
of the foremost Wagnerian sopranos
in America.
After' her New York debut Miss
Lawrence was hailed by critics as an
important addition to the Metropol-
itan family, both for her exceptional,
vocal ability and for her youthful
appearance at a time in which, as-
Lawrence Gilman said, "Great
Brunnhildes at 28 are as rare as.
arctic nightingales."

Richard Bonelli,
St ar Baritone,
Was Mechanic
Metropolitan Opera Singer
Has Offers For R dio
And Concert Work
Richard Bonelli, the leading bari-
tone of the Metropolitan Opera As-
sociation, who appears here in the
role of Escamillio in Bizet's Carmen
has been described as "A great singer,
a fine actor and a great young per-
sonality."
Bonelli made an auspicious opera-
tic debut with the Monte Carlo Opera
and went on to a triumphant tour of
the leading opera houses in Italy,
Germany, France and Cuba. During
a season with Mary Garden in Paris,
the young singer accepted an. offer
from the Chicago Civic Opera Co.
with whom he was starred from 1925
to 1931.
Engaged in tha spring of 1932 by
the Metropolitan, h, has been affil-
iated with that organization . ever
since, as one of its leadh:n perform-
ers.
In addition to his operativ work,
Bonelli, often called "The baritone
of baritones" by music critics, has
done a great deal of work in the con-
cert, radio and oratorio fields. His
orchestral engagements include ap-
pearances: at the Hollywood Bowl,
and with the San Francisco, Cleve-
land, Houston and . National Sym-
phony orchestras. In radio, he has
starred in the Ford, Nash, Firestone
and Vick broadcasts.
Born Richard Bunn in Port Byron,
N. Y., lie is a skilled mechanic, an. ar-
dent automobile enthusiast and .the
proud owner of a long, shiny, tan
sports roadster in which he races
across the country to keep his sing-
ing engagements.
Mr. Bonelli brings to the stage,- a
manly personality, a superb voice
and a polished artistry. Music lovers
know him from coast to coast. He is
indispensible for such festivals, as
those at Worcester, Evanston and
Ann Arbor. Conductors from Tos-
canini down demand: him.
Distinguished in every field of vocal
activity, he is undoubtedly one of the
leading singers of the day.
FORMERLY AT ALBION
Prof. Hardin Van Deursen of the
music school joined the faculty last
season -after teaching at Albion Col-
lege and other institutions.

Bruno . Castagno
BIZET'S

Chase Baromeo

Hilda Burke

III

I

SEASON TICKETS
for six concerts by "Stars;" Choruses, and Or-
chestra, are $3.00, $4.00, $5.00, for those
holding-"Festival" coupons; and $6.00, $7:00,
and $5.00 for others. Now on sale at the School
of Music, Maynard Street.
The prices of the individual concert tickets
will be: $. .50, $2.00 and $2.50.
SEND COUPON TODAY
- - - - -- -- - -- -
MR. CHARLES A. SINK
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Enclosed find remittance of $... . .for......
May Festival.Tickets, as follows:

P ! I

-,
i

-IMEN"

(IN CONCERT FORM)
~CAST'
CARMEN . . . Brun (
MICAELA
ERASQUITA'A, H .
MERCEDES. . . . Agn
DON JOSE . . . Giovanni M
ESCAMILLO. . . . Richard
MORALES
ZUNIGA Chase I

Castagn~a
a Burke
es Davis
artinelli
d Bonelli
Baromeo

SEASON TICKETS
Number:
(Six Concerts)
.......at $8.00 each $......
....at $7.00 each $. ......
.at $6.00 each $. ...

SINGLE .CONCERTS
Number:
.......Wed. Eve. at $ ........
... .Thurs. Eve. at $ ........
.. .Fri. Aft.. at $...:.. ...

RAMENDADO . . Arthur Hackett
DANCAIRO . . . Maurice Gerow
As leading contralto of the Metropolitan Opera Association, Bruna Castagna
has won wide acclaim for her performances as Carmen. She is a native of the
land of singers, Italy, and has a naturally opulent voice that thrills its every
listener. She is ably supported by four other Metropolitan stars in this concert
presentation of Bizet's "Carmen," besides the University Choral Union and the
If Wp~tiv~1 fo~rnnf isi Philadelnhia ....... II -

IeA .-- - if F 6StiVc1l G'tJ'[mon is ...... Fri. EVe: at $ ....... .

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