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April 24, 1938 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1938-04-24

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MAY FESTIVAL
SUJPPLEMENT

Sitri~~

4:Dl" att 4kr

SECTION
TWO

j Ml ll1 M IIMIIA®R IYAM i

- - ia 0 swev i i r of r - _ _._ .

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 1938

Marian Anderson

To Open Music FestivalMay 11;

Ormandy

Will

Conduct

Philadelphia

Negro Singer
Won Success

Program For The 1938 May Festiv

Outside U.

S.

Miss Anderson Has Sung
In Scandinavian Lands,
Italy And Germany
:cassian Audiences
Most -Enthusiastic
The success of Marian Anderson
can be traced to the day in 1925
when she,.won in a prize competition
the privilege of singing with the
Philadelphia' Philharmonic Orches-
tra.
Her triumph with the Philharmonic
led Mrs. Carl Diton, through the
National Association of Negro Mu-
sicians, to present Miss Anderson
with a scholarship for further study.
After several years of higher train-
ing and minor concert appearances,
.her advisors sent her to Europe. Her
first appearance was in Paris. The
reviews were flattering, land she was
engaged for a trans-European tour.
Applauded By Royalty
Her concerts were applauded by
the King of Sweden, the King and
Queen of Norway, the Archbishop of
Salzburg. In Soviet Russia, crowds
followed her from train to hotel.
High government officials entertained
her. Members of the Moscow Art
Theatre, including Stanislavsky,
adored her unabashbdly.
After her appearance at the White
House- several season ago, Miss An-
d rsoxr axed, .t course I felt
honored, and even quite nervous. But
I was immediately put at my ease by
the encouraging smile of the Presi-
dent and the charming simplicity of
higs wife."
The thrill felt by Miss Anderson
was no one-sided affair. In her daily
syndicated writings, Mrs. Roosevelt
said, "My husband and I hadt a rare
treat last night in listening to Marian
Anderson, a colored contralto who
has made a great success in Europe
and this country."
Born In Philadelphia
Born in Philadelphia, Miss Ander-
son first attracted notice when she
sang in the choir of the Union Bap-
tist Church. So adaptable was her
voice that she would sing in the
four ranges of soprano, alto, tenor
and bass-if there were absentees
from the choir.
Upon graduating from Southern
High School at the age of 18, she be-
came a pupil of Giuseppi Boghetti.
who coached her to success. Not
long after this she was engaged as
guest soloist with the Philharmonic.
Success In Russia
Miss Anderson met with great suc-
cess in her tour through Soviet Rus-
sia. "It is the most wonderful coun-
try for artists," she reports. "They
are given every facility for advance-
vent. The government aids them;
the public spoils them. I already have
gone there twice and I am looking
forward with pleasure to the tour
offered me by the Soviet Government
next year."
Miss Anderson gave concerts at.
both Leningrad and Moscow, and then
started on a tour which embraced
Kharkoff, Odessa, Batum and Tiflis.
"I have known applause during my
tours through Scandinavian coun-
tries, in Italy and in Germany. But
the Russian audiences simply went
wild. At the end of my concerts.
both in Leningrad and Moscow, they
flocked to the platform, they shouted
and stamped, asking for encores of
the songs they liked best.
"Perhaps ,Russians like them be-
cause they come from the soul of a
people who have suffered. I felt per-
fectly at home in Russia. I was
warned before I went there against
singing religious songs, but I found
no difficulties after I arrived there."
Sings Wednesday
Miss Anderson's program for Wed-

nesday, May 11, includes three Negro
spirituals: "Deep River," "Sometimes
I Feel Like a Motherless Child," and
"My Soul Is Anchored in the Lord."

MARIAN ANDERSON

8:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY
Soloist
MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY and PROF. EARL V. MOORE,
Conductors
Vater Unser in Himmelreich .................Bach
Fantasia in C major ...................... Handel
Symphony in D major, No. 35 ("Haffner")
Kochel 385;.......... ............ .... Mozart
Allegro con spirito; Andante; Menuetto; Presto
Alleluia. .............................Mozart
"O Don Fatale" from "Don Carlos"...........Verdi
Negro Spirituals:
Deep River ,
Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child
My Soul is Anchored in the Lord
MARIAN ANDERSON
Afternoon of a Faun... . ..................Debussy
Interlude and Dance from "LaVida Breve" . de Falla
8:30 p.m. THURSDAY
Soloists
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist
AGNES DAVIS, Soprana CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EUGENE ORMANDY and PROF. EARL V. MOORE,
Conductors
ALL-RUSSIAN PROGRAM
Overture to "Kowantchina". ......... Moussorgsky
"The Bells"...... . , ............. . Rachmaninoff
I. The Silver Bells- Allegro ma non tanto
ARTHUR HACKETT and Chorus.
II. The Golden Bells - Lento
AGNES DAVIS and Chorus
II. The Brazen Bells - Presto
CHORUS
IV. The Mournful Bells - Lento lugubre
CHASE BAROMEO and Chorus
Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, for
Piano and Orchestra.............Tschaikowsky
Allegro non troppo emolto maestoso; Allegro con
spirito
Andantino semplice
allegro con f uoco
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN
2:30 p.m. FRIDAY
Soloists
ALBERT SPALDING, Violinist
H ARDIN VAN DEURSEN, Baritone
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
EUGENE ORMANDY and JUVA HIGBEE,
Conductors
Overture to "The Bartered Bride" .....,. Smetana
The 'Virgin's Slumber Song ...... ....... ...Reger
The Snow-Drop .,.................Gretchaninoff
In These Delightful Pleasant Groves.......Purcell
It Was a Lover and His Lass.... . ........ .Morley
YOUNG PEOPLES FESTIVAL CHORUS
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" .. ... . ...........Dukas
Cantata, "Paul Bunyan" (First Performance) James
HARDIN VAN DEURSEN
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
('oncerto in D major, Op. 77, for Violin and
Orchestra............ , .-, ....... .....Brahms
Allegro non troppo; Adagio;
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace.
ALBERT SPALDING

8:30 p.m. FRIDAY
Soloist
NINO MARTINI, Tenor
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHE
EUGENE ORMANDY, Condu
Prelude and Fugue in B minor ... .
(Orchestrated by Lucien Cail
"Racconto di Rodolfo," from "La Boh
NINO MARTINI
Symphony No. 5 in E-flat........
Tempo nmolto moderato-Allegro II
ma un poco stretto-Presto-piul
Andante mosso quasi allegretto
Allegro molto-Un pochettino larga
"Una furtiva largima," from "L'Elisir
"Je crois entendre encore" from "Les P
Perles" ............. .............
"E lucevan la stelle" from "Tosca"
MR. MARTINI
Perpetual Motion ..................
(Orchestrated by Eugene Orm
"Till Eulenspiegel" .................
2:30 p.m. SATURDAY
Soloist
MARJORIE LAWRENCE, Sol
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHE
EUGENE ORMANDY, Cbndi
ALL WAGNER PROGRA
"Rheingold"
a. Invocation of Alberich
b. Entrance of the Gods into Walha
"Walkure"
a. Du bist der Lenz
b. Hoi yo to ho te
MARJORIE LAWRENCE
c. Wotan's Farewell and the Magic]
"Siegfried"
a. Wald weben
b. Siegfied Ascending, the Mountain
Brunrnhllde; and Finale
"Gotterdammerung"
a. Rhine Journey
b. Funeral March'
c. Immolation'and Closing.Scene
MISS LAWRENCE
8:30 p.m. SATURDAI
Soloists
BRUNA CASTAGNA, Cont
HILDA BURKE, Soprano
AGNES DAVIS, Soprano
RICHARD BONELLI, Bani
CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
ARTHUR HACKETT, Ten
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, I
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL1
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHI
EARL V, MOORE, Conduc
"CARMEN" (in Concert Form)..... .
CARMEN ......1 ........... BRUN
Micaela and Frasquita .......... H
Mercedes .......,.. ....... A
Don Jose .... . .... ...GIOVANNI
Escamillo .........,. ....... RICHA
Morales and Zuniga.. . ....... CHAc
Danc.rio ................MAUI
Ramendado .'............... ARTHI

yna gno
Cast San
For Toscanini.
At, MilanItaly
GaiiierI Fame By C kncert
Presentations In Europe
And In South America
Bruna Castagna, celebrated Italian
contralto who will sing the title role
in the May Festival presentation of
"Carmen," reached prominence in
the Metropolitan Opera Company via
the concert halls of South America.
A native of the land of singers,
Italy; Mine. Castagna made her deb
but at the age of 17 at the Teatro
Sociale of Mantua as Marina in
"Boris Godounoff." As a result of her
performance, Tullio Serafin, who was
in the audience that night, signed
her to sing at the Colon opera house
in Buenos Aires. She remained there
for three years.
Upon her return to her native
country, Toscanini gave her an au-
dition, and she signed a contract to
sing for three years at La Scala,
Milan. Appearances in the leading
opera houses of Europe, Egypt, Aus-
tralia and South America preceded
her initial engagement in North
America.
As leading cbntralto of the Metro-
politan Opera Company, Mme. Cas-
tagna has displayed her ability in
"Norma," "Carmen," "Aida," "I Tro-
vatore," "Cavalleria R-ustic ana,"
"Rigoletto" and "La Gioconda." Her
impressive operatic and song reper-
toire includes English, French, 'Ger-
man, Spanish and Italian selections.
The New York World-Telegram, in
reviewing the Metropolitan's presen-
tation of "Carmen," conmiented,
"Such a genuine impersonation of
the much impersonated Carmen is
rare and treasurable.~

New Singers
Bring Rise Of'
Wagner Music
McGeoch Says Lawrence,
Flagstad Have Added
To Its Great Popularity
Presentation of an all-Wagner pro-
gram as the fifth concert of this
year's May Festival is in keeping with
the unprecedented rise in popularity
which Wagnerian music has enjoyed'
on the American operatic scene in
the past two years, in the opinion of
Prof. Olenn D. McGeoch of the
School' of Music.
The sudden rise to public favor of
Wagnerian opera is due, Professor
McGeoch believes, to the advent of:
such stars as Marjorie Lawrence, who
will appear in the fifth concert with
the Philadelphia Symphony under
the baton of Eugene Ormandy.
Wagnerian roles ° make great de-
mands upon singers, Professor Mc-
Geoch pointed out, and heretofore1
there has been a dearth of artists able
to sing the heroic arias. But with the{
advent of such stars as Kirsten Flag-
stad and Miss Lawrence, Wagnerian
opera has without a doubt become
the most popular operatic work in
America, he said, poiuting to the
success the Metropolitan Opera has
enjoyed in the past two years.
Wagner's most renowned work,
"Der Ring des Niebelungen," in the
words of H. L. Mencken, "the most
stupendous work of art ever con-
ceived by the mind of man," will pro-
vide the selections for the all-Wagner
concert.
"The Ring" is a t1rilogy composed
of the prelude, "Das Rheingold," and
three sepai'ate works, "Die Walkure,"
"Siegfried" and "Gotterdammerung."
Included in the prelude are two selec-
tions, "Invocation of Alberich" and
(Continued on Page 10)

rchestra
7 era Stars,
Noted Soloists
Are Scheduled
STRA
actor
.Bach Martinelli Sings; Paldin
liet) Pa
eme" . Puccini Will Play; Chorus Gives
'Paul Bunyan' Premiere
d.tSibelius
p rto Lawrence To sing
Imente WagnerProgram
d'Amore"
..... Donizetti From the opening "Heri Jesu
echeurs Des Christ, ich weiss gar wohn" to the
.. Bizet final curtain of "Carmen," the Uni-
... Puccini versity Musical Society brings to its
45th annual May Festival 14 soloists,
.. Paganini seven of them from the Metropolitan
andy) Opera Company. The six concert
..... .Strauss ' series will begin at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 11, in Hill Auditorium and
will end Saturday night.
For the third stccessive year it will
be the famed Philadelphia Or-
prano chestra, conducted by Eugene Or-
ESTRA mandy, that will provide the ac-
uctor companiment for these artists and
M play "most of the selections. The
Choral Union and Young People's
Festival Chorus will also participate.
lla Advance ticket reservations indi-
cate a capacity turnout for the event,
President Charles A. Sink of the
School of Music announced. Reser-
vations will be open by mail or on
personal application to the music
F'ire Music school offices. The date for over-the-
counter sales has not yet been set, he
said.
to Meet Anderson Opens Serres
When she replaced Nelson Eddy
at a Choral Union concert last year,
Marian Anderson, contrato, received
such acclaim that she was chosen to
open the 1938 Festival,
Juva Higbee's Young People's Fes-
tival Chorus will present the world
Y premiere of Dorothy James's Can-
tata, "Paul Bunyan," at the third
concert Friday, May 13. More than
;ralto 400 voices of Ann Arbor high school
students will be heard.
This season's program will feature
ton five stars more than id last year's
which drew a capacity audience
or Chase Baromeo, University 'alum-
enor nus, will sing "The Mournful Bells,"
UNION from Rachmaninoff's "The Bells" in
ESTRA the second concert Thursday and will
ctor take part in the concert form of
. . ..... .Bizet "Carmen" Saturday.
A CASTAGNA Miss Anderson, the Philadelphia
[ILDA BURKE Orclestra, under Eugene Omandy,
GNES DAVIS and the women's voices of the Choral
MARTINELLI Union will open the series with a
RD BONELLI varied program at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
SE BAROMEO day, May 11.
LICE GEROW Russian Program Second
UR HACKETT An All-Russian program, in which
Rachmaninoff's "Bells" will be heard,
comprises the second concert Thurs-
day evening. Soloists ae A D
'linist,
vis, soprano, Prof. Arthur Hackett
of the music school, tenor, Mr. Baro-
lud ence meo, bass, and Artur Rubinstein.
pianist. The Philadelphia Orchestra
and the Choral Union will again par-
icerts that had to ticipate.
a loss were over Prof. Hardin Van Deursen of the
made a name for music school, baritone, will sing the
ming trip of Rus- lead in Miss James's "Paul Bunyan"
but, then one of with the Young People's Festival
d one of America. Chorus at the Friday afternoon pro-
'men quickly real- gram. Albert Spalding, violinist, will
9merica had pro- play Brahms' "Concerto in D major,
the first rank. Op. 77 for Violin and Orchestra."
Schedule Screen and radio favorite Nino
s a concert sched- Martini, tenor, will sing arias from
0 concertsannutwo of Puccini's operas "Tosca" and
DO9 cnctetendu "La Boheme," in the fourth concert
,o 0 n the United .-- -

n Europe. He Friday evening. From the former he
ery leading sym- has chosen "E lucevan le stelle" and
this country and from the latter, "'bacconto di Ro-
orcnasurs a-Q - Adolfo."'

1

Rubistein To Make First Bow
.n Ann Arbor At May Festival

Suave Martin'
Stars In Radio,
Stage,, Screen,
Believes That It Takes
Only Sonme Imagination
'Jo li1ake Life Sparkle
"All it takes is a little imagination'
to give thirigs the spark of life." Such
is the philosophy of Nino Martini,
radio lyric tenor who will once again
dazzle his public in the fourth con-
cert of the May Festival. Making his
first concert in Philadelphia in three
years, Martini, leading tenor of the
Metropolitan Opera and star of radio
and screen established two new rec-
ords at the Academy of Music re-
cently when he sang before an audi-
ence that occupied every available
seat and. all standing room in the
auditorium. An overflow crowd, de-
nied admission, filled the streets sur-
rounding the building.
Mr. Martini's audience was esti-
mnated by the management of the
auditorium as the largest ever as-
sembled for an individual concert
artist and the number of encores he
was called upon to do - he sang 23
-outstrips by a large margin previ-

American Artist Graduated
From Bologna Institute
With Highest Honors
By MALCOLM LONG
Albert Spalding, generally consid-
ered the dean of American violinists,
began his career at a time when the
prejudice against native-born Ainer-
ican artists was still very strong.
Thus his debut was made in Paris
after nine years of 'study under the
best teachers in New York, the Paris
Conservatory and in Florence, Italy.
Although he was born in Chicago,
Spalding's parents were New Yorkers.
At the age of seven he asked for a
violin and began his lessons. At four-
teen he graduated from the Bologna
Conservatory with the highest honors
accorded to anyone since Mozart. He
received such favorable comment on
his debut that he was asked to appear
on a benefit at the Chatelet with the
aged and famous Adelina Patti, who
was emerging from retirement for a.
farewell performance.
When Patti heard that his accom-
panist had failed to appear she of-
fered hers. After the concert Spald-

years, all of the con
be given at such
and he had already
himself. A barnstor
sia followed his de
Western Europe an(
Both critics and lay
ized that- at last A
duced a virtuoso of
Has Heavy
He now maintain
ule of more than V1
ally with from 60 t
States and the res
has played with ev
phony orchestra in
all of the first rate
In addition to his
Spalding had had n
accorded him. He w;
ican to sit as a judg
tions of the Paris{
one of five violini
American ever to'
the famous La Seal
Milan. He toured
with the New Y
Orchestra, the first
can orchestra had
neat.
Enlisted Wi
Cancelling $35,00

Spalding Of Chicago, Vio
First Played To Paris A

1By vlRG;INIA VOORHEES
For the first time in the history of
the May Festival, a single program
will be devoted in its entirety to Rus-
sian coipOsrs. This All-Russian
Program will be given at the second
Festival conueirt at 8:30 p.m. Satur-
clay, May 14.
For the first time, also, Artur Rub-
instein, the distinguished Polish pi-
anist, will make his appearance in
Ann Arbor.
Rubinstein is hailed by orchestral

in eight years, Professor Brinkman
said, because of the great popularity
of the artist in Europe and South
America. His long absence from this
country, Professor Brinkman pointed
out, makes his success here even more
remarkable. The pianist is returning
primarily for the Festival, for he was
scheduled to return to Europe im-
mediately after his recently-complet-
ed South American tour.
4 The program, in which some of the
representative writings of Moussorg-

orchestras abroad.,
concert successes
nany other honors
as the first Amer-
;e at the examina-
Conservatory, and
sts and the only1
have appeared at
[a Opera House in
Europe as soloist
ork Philharmonic
time any Ameri-
toured the conti-
th Italians
0 worth of signed

Lawrence In Wagner Arias
An Ail-Wagner program at 2:30
p.m. Saturday will feature Marjorie
Lawrence, Metropolitan Opera so-
prano, in selections from "Walkure"
and "Gotterdammerung," while the
Philadelphia group plays excerpts
from "Rheingold" and "Siegfried."
Metropolitan Opera stars will close
the Festival series Saturday evening
when they join the University Choral
Union and the Philadelphia Orches-
tra in a concert version of "Carmen."
Bruna Castagna will sing the role
of Carmen. The complete cast fol-
lows: Micaela and Frasquita by Hilda

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