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April 01, 1938 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-04-01

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ti WDAY, Afilliil, 1, 1938

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Yannigans Overcome Varsity Nine 10-5 In Six Inning

Game

_ , ,

Thomas Battles ADE L
BomberTodayA I
Louis Is 20-1 Choice In EDITORS NOTE Ben Moostein a
junio colleague from the smelt regions
Title Bout insists catching the piscatoral pad-
Boiiiollf dlcrs is one of lfes little thrills. So
we'll let him tell about it.
CHICAGO, March 31.-- (A) -The From an offhand view, some 350
swinger from Minnesota's farm lands, miles offhand, it looks as though a
hopeful Harry Thomas, gets the bunch of northern Michigan citizens
chance tonight to swing the biggest are going crazy. And that's just about
upset in modern ring history. the word, 'cause it's smelt fishing
Thomas meets Joe Louis, the 23- time. When it's smelt fishing time
year-old heavyweight boxing cham- in Michigan, well, all that's needed is
pion, in a scheduled 15-round bout the music.
at the Stadium-and no one except A smelt, to describe it, isn't
Thomas himself and his manager, very much. About twice .the size
Nate Lewis, has come forward to say of a large sardine, the fish is very
that Thomas will win. ,o ag adntefs svr
hTh m ds ,theoeticalyn.r little more than a shrunken sal-
The bettmn odds, theoretically are mon, ichthyologically speaking.
20 to 1 that Louis retains his title by But what it lacks in size it makes
decision and 10 to 1 he knocks Thom- up in numbers. That's their big
as out. They might just as well be attraction.
100 or 1,000 to 1 in the face of a
total absence of actual wagers. Lately the smelt have started run-
The bout is scheduled to start at ning in the streams of the upper mitt
10 p.m. and will be broadcast by region of the lower peninsula, known
NBC. as the smelting-pot district, and their
It is admitted that the blond, pallid reproductive drive almost shoved a
looking Thomas can punch, but he's Spanish insurgent drive off the front
easy to hit when trying to wind up page. The smelt are important ec-
his wild, round-house swings from onomically as well as for the cuisine.
the floor. Max Schmeling -knocked Without them two festivals and six
him down several times before the chamber of commerces would have
bout was halted i the eighth. no raison d'etre.
The brightest bit of interest at- On the dinner table they're
tached to the Thomas-Louis affair, extremely tasty,that is, if enough
generally recognized as a tune-up for of them are eaten to leave a
Joe and his slated June 22 bout with taste. Besides, larger fish feed
Max is speculation on how long it off them, such as trout and sal-
will take the Bomber to put Thomas mon.
down and out. News reports recently printed
items saying that.the Eighth Annual
I-M SOFTBALL SEASON OPENS Smelt Jamboree at Boyne City drew
.5,000 persons and three hundred of
The Intramural softball season will50hersods anduthehedios
getundrwa onTuesday, April 19, them had a banquet. Whether it was
get underway onTuesdayA The on smelt or beef the report forgot to
it was announced yesterday. 'The _____________ __
closing date for entries is Saturday,
April 2. There will be five divisions; D f er ,Self-w 4
fraternity, professional fraternity,in-D urs
depenident,~ professional independent,
and faculty. Groups which desire to0 .-
enter teams should register at the I-M Q jeng
building as soon as possible.
By BEN MOORSTEIN
Duffers, self-styled luminaries,
19th-holers and just plain golfers are
:pending a lot of their time shining up
T he irons and polishing the woods in
preparation for the opening of the
University Golf Course Saturday.
With the opening, at least 100 golf-
Crs will take to the links and give the
course its first official workout of the
year. 100, that is, if former years
EE an serve as any criterion. However,
1,0;he Varsity team has been traversing
+ its fairways for over a week now.
Expect Good Cards
The 'aundred-odd may be swinging
-he sticks for the first time this sea-
;on but some pretty good cards
:;$should be turned in. The rubber
medal will go to the lowest score and
if he can turn in better than a 73
he'll get two medals. 73 is the lowest
inaugural day mark made for the
- "" course-that in 1935 by a Texas
: :::reshman, Johnny Cameron, who
( \ later knocked the ball around a bit
with the frosh team.
Probably unknown to the majority
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. . is .dry.AWL
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NEW STYLES F]
Going Places S
Wear a C
There ar
dines .
we mean.
501nary kind.
~ . . . VA RSV
them ...
OUR NEW LOW PRICE color blen
Everything in the Topcoat distinctii
family is here. Come in
and try them on. sport mod
Miltons Economy them ver
' ..d a. v

INES

... by Irvin Lisagor,

mention. At East Jordan, a rival vil-
lage, the C. of C. thought that some-
thing regal was in order, along mas-
culine lineskof course, and so they
crowned a king of Smeltium.
Rumors have it, however, that
the title was relinquished to the
gent who, while standing waist
deep in mid-stream, scooped up
one of the sparlings and with
no garnishments whatsoever, ex-
cept some chewing tobacco, pro-
ceeded to swallow it then and
there. News items also mentioned
a "spitting contest" but no de-
tails leave us in the dark.
The real smelt fisher is an avid
angler-to speak mildly. He'll sit pa-
tiently on a bank for hours waiting
tfor the smelt to hit. This interval is
as much a part of smelt fishing as the
actual catch. Between proving that
there's many a sip 'tween the bo'l and
,he lip and endeavoring to keep warm
in the process, tall tales of the Bun-
yan type make the rounds. This us-
ually winds up with all agreeing that
smeltin' ain't ever ag'in goin' to be
like in '98.
We remember Frank, who wait-
ed from 6 p.m. till well-nigh
midnight for the run to start.
Meanwhile the banks behind him
were becoming packed with other
incorrigibles. When the conser-
vation officer fired the shot al-
lowing the dippers to come and
get 'em, Frank was the first into
the water with his makeshift nets
-remodeled birdcages. But there
were many behind him and the
stream was narrow and shallow.
The surge of fishermen pushed

him through the stream, up the
other bank and left him as high
and dry as the hoped-for, but
unrealized, smelt would have
been.
It's a great sight watching the
silvery streaks hit the stream with a
bank as they go up river in search of
spawning grounds. Literally, tens of
thousands of them. If less than a
bushel-full is taken that individual is
considered a mediocre fisherman.
All that's needed to catch the
critters is any sort of scoop-
washtubs, wastepaper baskets,
burlap sacks, and once in a great
while, some store nets. A good
solid footing, if you're standing
on the edge helps.
The smelt stick to a close schedule
in their annual race. In fact, the exact
starting date of this year's run in
several of the streams was hit right
the persent week through the middle
on the nose. The season lasts from
of April. -B.M.
April Foolisms: Brooklyn vs. thel
Browns in the World's Series . .
Marvin Owen to hit 60 homers this
season . . . Charlie Hoyt to pre-
dict Michigan to win the out-
door track title . . . Wally Weber
to lose his voice . . . Fred Janke at
fullback next fall . . . Adolf, Benito
and Josef to abdicate, then organize
a Society for the Propagation of
Tolerance and Hope . . . Leo Beebe
to quit worrying . . . Martha Raye
and Joe E. Brown to shut up . .
Herc Renda to supplant Jake Town-
send as the Wolverine cage pivot
man...

Subs Make 15
Safeties; Wind
Hurts Hurlers
Dan Smick Allows 7 Hits;
Beebe Gets 4 Bingles ;
NeilsoniSlams Homer
By BUD BENJAMIN
Scoring in every inning, Michigan's
Yannings pounded out 15 lusty hits
yesterday to whip the Regulars 10 to
5 in six innings.
Climatic conditions hampered both
teams throughout. A strong wind,
blowing plateward, lessend the ef-
fectiveness of hurlers Burt Smith
and Dan Smick as well as holding
back many drives that might have,
fallen safely,
Leo Beebe, who worked out with
the Yannigans in the game, led the
hitters with four bingles for a perfect
day at bat. Beebe slapped out a
triple, double, and two singles. Earl
Smith, another reserve, was good for
three safe blows for second honors.
Smick's submarine ball stood him
in good stead yesterday after a three
run Regular splurge in the first in-
ning. The lanky junior allowed sev-
en hits, struck out four, but was wild
-walking seven.
It started out like a Regular romp.
Walter Peckinpaugh, first up, tripled
to right, Don Brewer walked, Freddie
Trosko singled, and all hands were
safe as Smick threw past second on
Elmer Gedeon's bounder to the box.,
Forest Evashevski flied to Charley
Pink, and three runs had crossed the
plate.
Back came the Yannigans with a
two run flurry. Paul Neilson, first
up, slammed a long homer out in
center field, Earl Smith doubled and
scored as Mike Rodnick beat out a
scratch hit and Hank Greenberg
Jbounded out.
The rest of the game was all Yanni-
gan. Smick, gaining momentum, shut
out the Regulars for the next four
innings although he eased up to al-
low them two useless runs in the
final frame.
BOX SCORE

Iii

Styled Luminaries Await
f School's Own Golf Course

>>
,:
:;'.

of the divot-diggers are some of the
facts concerning the layout they'll be
tramping. Whether they know it or
not the University course is consid-
ered tops among the country's college
courses besides being one of the best
competitive set-ups. Yale runs a
close second.
Layout Is Ideal
Planned by the foremost architects
in this field in the United States,
McKenzie and Maxwell, the course
was completed in 1926. The initial
cost, that needed to acquire the land,
was $344,000 and doesn't include the
cost of construction.
The greatness of the course lies in
its design. The layout is almost na-
tural, very little being done to im-
prove on Mother Nature. The greens
are placed in natural hollows and
MEET CALLED OFF
The Congress swimming meet
which was scheduled for last night
at the I-M pool has been postponed
and will be run off some time after
Spring Vacation.

hardly any preparation was needed
in the construction of the fairways.
More important, perhaps, to a
spectator, is the ideal viewpoints af-
forded. The first ridge offers a sight
of five greens and tees ,and other
ridges offer as good vantage points. A
spectator can just sit, and withoutI
moving more than three or four
times, watch almost the entire match.
My Greatest
t'HRILL
BENNIE OOSTERBAAN
Michigan Basketball Coach

Regulars
Peckinpaugh, 3b.
Brewer, ss ...
Trosko, 2b.......
Gedeon, lb......
Evashevski, c .....
Floresch, if......
Kremer, cf ........
Lisagor, rf .:......
B. Smith, p ........

AB R
4 1
.1 1
.2 1
. . 4 3 0
. ..3 0
. . ..4 0
....2 0
....3 1
. 2 1

IRST AT WILD'S
spring Vacation

In 1926, Ohio State and Michigan'
were playing before a capacity crowd
in the Buckeye's stadium. We had a
great team that year with Benny
Friedman, our captain, winding up
his brilliant career at Michigan. Ohio
had a powerful club, and we were
primed for a real battle.
The Buckeyes scored 10 points
in the first quirter on a touch-
down conversion, and field goal.
Michigan was good for seven,
Friedman tossing me a pass in
the end zone from a fake place
kick formation which completely
fooled our opponents. With only
a few minutes left before half
time, Friedman dropped back and
booted a . beautiful 43 yard field
goal from a difficult angle to tie
the score.
We added seven points in the third
period, another Friedman pass, this
time to Louie Hoffman, turning the
trick, and we led 17 to 10. Ohio
wasn't through, however. In the
waning minutes of the game, the
Buckeyes pushed over a touchdown,
but they failed to addthe crucial ex-
tra point, and we won 17 to 16. It
was the most thrilling game in which
I have ever played.
Peckinpau gh Shows
Film HereMonday
"Batter Up," the American Lague
baseball picture, will be shown at
7:30 p.m., Monday, at the Ann Arbor
High School auditorium.
Roger Peckinpaugh, former major
league manager and father of Michi-
gan's regular third baseman, Walter,
will comment on finer points of the
film. Peckinpaugh has been showing
this picture throughout the country
for the past two years.
Caps, Gowns and Hoods
FOR FACULTY AND GRADUATES

Totals.........24 5
Yannigans AB R
Neilson, 3b ...........2 1
Paulus, 3b ...........2 0
E. Smith, ss ..........4 1
Rodnick, 2b ..........2 0
Levine, 2b ...........2 1
Greenberg, lb ........3 2
Beebe, c ............. 4 2
Pink,lif .............3 0
Goldberg, cf .. .......3 1.
Brauser, rf ...........1 1
Campbell, rf.........2 1
Smick, p .............3 0
Totals ..........31 10
Regulars .......... ...300
Yannigans .... ....212

H
2
1
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
7
H
1
0
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
0
2
0
15

O
3
0
2
6
4
1
1
1
0
18
O
0
0
2
1
1
4
7
1
0
0
1
1
18

A
1
0
1
0'
2
0
0
0
7
11
A
0
0
4
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
3
8

'A

I

002-05-
122-10

Errors: Gedeon, Paulus, 2, Smick.
Home run: Neilson.
3 base hits: Peckinpaugh, Beebe.
2 base hits: E. Smith, Beebe.
Struck out: By B. Smith, 2; by
Smick, 4.
Bases on balls: Off B. Smith, 3;
off Smick, 7.

IN

-aberdine
e lots of gaber-
you know what
.. just the ordi-

Skipper
BUSH COAT
Designed by Wilson
Brothers for a free
and easy summer.

.

But not these.

TY TOWN styled
gave them rare
dings . . . added
ve lounge and
eling . .. made
y, very style-

Tj

1

I

II

HI

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