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March 24, 1938 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-03-24

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"_ "_THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. .

~

THURSDAY, MARCH 24,1938

Music Profession
Is Sunect Of Talk
Prof. Earl V. Moore of the School
of Music will continue the current
series of talks and discussions on
various specialized fields and profes-
sions at 4:15 p.m. today in Room 1210
Angell Hall. All students interested
in selecting music as a vocation are
urged to .attend.
Professor Moore's talk will be the
seventh in the series sponsored by
the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts. The next speaker will
be Dean Henry C. Anderson of the
College of Engineering, who will talk
on March 30.
Nea iu Letters
Sicw Tragee
Iinprisoned E x- S I u d e nit
Tells Of War Life
(Continued from Page 11
"Nearly all the people around our
village are peasants who have been
given land of their own for the first
time. Many are organized into coop-
eratives and utilize progressive meth-
ods. . Farming is still .very primi-
tive here (last year thousands starved
because the wind didn't blow, and
they couldn't winnow their wheat)
but they are an intelligent and very
industrious people (they work even
harder than our farmers).
"We are making a real effort to
learn the language and get close to
them. We are beginning to see that
here is where we, who have come at
this late date, can contribute most."
Elsewhere he said: "Our army has
been improved greatly and everyone
is confident . . . The Spaniards have
formed a real army that now com-
pares with any in the world ...
"My assistant is a fine fellow from
the University of Rochester, whose
dad is also over here. (His dad, by
the way, is one of the trustees of
Commonwealth College).
"A miner is my immediate superior,
and a college professor, his. There
are labor organizers, students, work-
ers of all kinds, a farmer or two from
my section (New Mexico), a few lum-
berjacks, sailors, several teachers, and
as far as nationalities go-every kind.
Our battalion (the McKenzie-Papi-
neau) has Americans and Canadians
with a Finnish section of 30 men in
addition. About half the outfit is
Spani, in conformity with the Gov-
ernment's policy."
On Oct. 23, after his first stretch
in the trenches, he wrote: "The bap-
tism is over. It took! I'm still on
two feet, but there are a goodly num-
ber of the boys who are not. We
went over the top for the first time
on the 13th '--
"We have eaten well after dark, as
the fascists, at the present time, have
a nice cross-fire and make us keep
down during the day."
And later that day, after being
withdrawn from the front lines: "To-
day a bath for the first time in three
weeks. During that time I have
washed my hands twice. There is
only water to drink. . . We are a dirty,
unshaven lot--dead tired, but still
very much anti-fascist."

Scientist Nazi Target

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
U11 V ( ye of the Asti tant to the lrpidfnr
tiltt.i 3.w ,11 .Ctl a~rt, can tt id y

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THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 1938
VOL. XLV111. No. 125
Smoking in University Buildings:
Attention is called to the general rule
Ghat smoking is prohibited in Uni-
versity buildings except in private of-
fices and assigned smoking rooms
where precautions can be taken and
,ontrol exercised. This is neither a
mere arbitrary regulation nor an at-
,,empt to meddle with anyone's per-,
sonal habits. It is established andj
enforced solely with the purpose ofI
preventing fires. In the last five years,
15 of the total of 50 fires reported, or
30 per cent, were caused by cigarettes
or lighted matches. To be effective,
the rule must necessarily apply to
bringing lighted tobacco into or
through University buildings and to 1

of Students lists of those who have
submitted certificates to them for
participation in these groups. This
should be done at once on blanks pro-
vidled in Room 2; University Hall.
Assembly
Congress
Debating -Men
Debating----Women
Freshman Glee Clib
Girls Glee Club
Hillel Foundation
Men's Council (3)
Michigan Daily
Michiganensian
Military Ball Commi tIIee
Panhellenic
Play Production
Progressive Club
Student Senate

De LOVELY People
U-
De LECTABLE Foods

De FASTEST Ship I
f

De LIGHTFUL

Sta~terooms

'hoc nvriy iidn nli Senior Ball Comnmit tee
Sigmund Freud (above), Jewish the lighting of cigars, cigarettes, andC
psyehologist who ptopounded the pipes within buildings--including Th
thec.ry that man's nervous ills could such lighting just previous to going i
be attributed to sexual impulses outdoors. Within the last few years Bronson-Thomas Pre i German:
and the restraints of civilization, a serious fire was started at the exit (Value about $50.00) Open to all
was reported seriously ill in Vienna from the Pharmacology building by undergraduate students in German of
after Nazi secret police entered his the throwing of a still lighted match distinctly American training. Willj
home and siezed his passport. into refuse waiting removal at the be awarded on the results of a three-I
doorway. If the rule is to be enforced hour essay competition to be heldE
; , r Ijat all its enforcement must begin at under departmental supervision on
M1ss (4urtis 1o Head the building entrance. Further. it 'Friday, March 25, from 2:00-5 p.m.,
is impossible that the rule should be 204 U.H. Contestants must satisfy
W.A.A. Next Yearf -enforced with one class of persons if the department that they have done
another class of persons disregards it. the necessary reading in German.
(Continued from Page 1) It is a disagreeable and thankless The essay may be written in English
- jask to "enforce" almost any rule. or German. Each contestant will be
has also been a club basketball cap- This rule against the use of tobacco free to choose his own subject from1
tain and hockey manager. Miss I within buildings is perhaps the most a list of at least 10 offered. The list
White is also a member of Wyvern thankless and difficult of all, unless will cover five chapters in the de-
and is properties chairman for J.G.P. it has the winning support of every- velopment of German literature from
She is the outgoing fen1ing manager one concerned. An appeal is made to 1750 to 1900, each of which will be
and was chairman of posters for the all persons using the University build- represented by at least two subjects.
swimming meet. ings-staff members, students and Students who wish to compete andI
Miss McKay is a sophomore re- others-to contribute individual co- who have not yet handed in their
porter on the women's staff of the operation to this effort to protect applications should do so immediately
Daily and has worked on the fresh- University buildings against fires and obtain final directions.'
man project and sophomore cabaret. This statement iineted at the
Miss Hartman is outgoing intramural request of the Conference of Deans. Kothe-Hildner Prize in German:'
manager. Miss Dunbar was on the Shirley W. Smith. Two prizes, of $30 and $20 respec-.
dcrimitory committee for the swim tively, will be awarded to students
ming meet and is a club basketball Women undergraduate students at- taking German 32 in a translation
captaing tending the Martha Graham Dance ompetition (German-English and
Miss Royal is outgoing basketballEnlsGem )tobhldMri
manager and was league house chair- Recital on Monday evening, March 25, from 3-5 p.m., Room 201 U.H.
man for the swimming meet. Miss 28, may have the half hour extra Students who wish to compete and
Sharkey was program chairman for permission accorded to University !who have not yet handed in their
Sophomore Cabaret and was on the f iuncti applications should do so immediately
swimming meet committee. She has nand obtain final directions.
also worked on the teas for the league Ja t e Perry,
Assii taiit licani of Itronien.
house zones. Miss Wolf is outgoing AChoral Union Rehearsals The
swimming manager. ~~~- -l', Clioru-of t}-, Ch fv}i~-inn
W me s hou ' . ~theCa U ni~~ .. n~ L4IfL

So wly elav? Inn, don't walk, io the nearest Travel .'rent and tell him
goal wani a I-'ren ci Ii ewe reseraon to I' to Europe. Then you ' have a truly
IuNUI'n1 'crossing (even the 'ouri t and ''lird C'lass aeconiundatlions are
modelsofhlcasitl ivi-) .. .- and von will enjov F rench (nisii that is a
reveloion in gl-"asllojoini eujoviint (wi 11amsound wine fr-e a every xeal l).
FRENCI4 LINE+
1247 WAS HING tON BLVD., DETROIT. MICH. .#
Fly Anywhere in Europe via Air-France
YE
Bicycle th rou i E U RPE?
IF YOU ARE YOUNG, curious, adventurous, and want to see Europe
as it really is, beneath the veneer which is all most tourists see -
why not? Over 300 American students and graduates did it with
us last summer, returning enthusiastic and refreshed. This may be
your last chance and foreign exchange is very favorable now.

I

Most Schools Have
Dorms, Poll Sho-
(Continued from Page 1)
education considerably closer tot
total life of the student.
The University of Wisconsin,
uated in Madison, a town consid
ably larger than Ann Arbor, repo
that rents average from $3 to $
week for rooms in general within f
blocks of campus. Rents are slig
ly lower further away.
Among the methods of dealing w.
the housing shortage one of the m
effective has been through the c
struction of cooperative dormitor
the prices in these units were c
siderably lower than in the dorn
tories.

Students, College of Engineering: will rehearse regularly on Thursdays
Saturday, March 26, will be the final Men's Chorus will rehearse
day for dropping a course without regularlyoy7mp.m.; M nCys a rheasd
recrd.. Curss my b drppe 1 ulalyon Mondays at 7 p.m.; and
irecord. tCouises may be dropped the entire Choral Union will rehearse
on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. and Tuesdays
sifier after conference with the in- at 7 p.m.
structor in the course.
the Extra Currilar Activities;The Choral Union Vacancies. A few va-
cancies exist in the tenor and second
Chairmen or Managers of the follow- bass section in the Choral Union,
sit- ing stuident organizations have failedTa
[er.. tosbi'oteOfieo'teDa ryouts may be arranged after regu-
rsto submit to the Office of the Dean, (Contronled on page 4)

FEATURES: Small homogene-
ous groups with young but exper-
ienced and responsible leaders,
new English geared bicycles,
short cycling distances with lei-
surely stops in quaint villages,
beautiful old-world landscapes
and historic cities, direct contact
with natives.
ITINERARIES: Specialized
(France, England, Germany and
Scandinavia) and general (the
above plus Switzerland, Belgium,
Holland, Italy, Czechoslovakia
and Austria). Each itinerary
carefully planned by European
leaders on the ground who know
not only the usual guide-book
"sights," which any tour can
show you, but also colorfully na-
tive haunts not overrun by Amer-
ican tourists.
ACCOMMODATIONS: Clean,
comfortable, simple. Ocean pas-
sage on Holland-American and
Cunard liners, excellent cuisine,
splendid cabins, roomy decks, en-
tertainment. In Europe: attrac-
tive inns, , pensions, the better
youth hostels, tiny private homes.
Abundant, regular healthful
meals.

COST: 9 to 11 weeks tours from
$298 to $468, depending upon
itineraries. This INCLUDES ALL
TRANSPORTATION, F O O D,
LODGING, TIPS, ENTERTAIN-
MENT (opera, cathedrals, thea-
tres, museums, etc.) and SPEND-
TNG MONEY ON CYCLING
DAYS, from New York back to
New York. Only purely personal
expenses such as laundry, pass-
port and visas are not included.
REQUIREMENTS: Applicants
must be under 35 years of age,
and, before being accepted into
any group, must fill in a detailed
information blank and submit a
Doctor's certificate of good
health.
FOR THOSE WHO PREFER,
THERE ARE ALSO UNHUR-
RIED MOTOR-BUS, FALT-
BOOT (canoe), AND TRAIN
AND WALKING TRIPS.
These tours will appeal especially
to those desirous of avoiding the
usual hurrying about, colored
glasses and "shock absorbers"
characteristic of most American
tours, and those eager to see be-
neath 'the surface in order to
learn how the real European nor-
mally lives.

4 a
our
hlt-
vith 1
lost
on-i
ies.
mi-

(Ckiue nPae4

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

1

I. EVNN AIRGA s

I

Lu ~jfj I~r e, eoryj

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Radio Phonograph and
500 classical' records. Phone 5538
evenings. 468
WASHED SAND and Gravel. Drive-
way Gravel. Killins Gravel Co.
Phone 7112. 7x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
NOTICES
VIOLA STEIN, 706 Oakland. Phone
6327. Experienced typist. Reason-
able rates. 232
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any

old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
merits. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Kappa Alpha Theta pin be-
tween Observatory Lodge and Ul-
rich's. Jane Garnett. Telephone
2-3341. 466
WILL the person who found two
watercolors at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, please return to
Laura Adasko, 2-2591. 471{
LOST: Notebook and Botany I text
in Union Library Tuesday. Call
3936. Sidney Wagner. 469
LOST: Small gold pin in shape of
wings. Saturday at Pretzel Bell. Re-
ward. Call Miss Mueller, 7717.
470
LOST: Pair long black gloves at
Phi Delt house Friday 18th. 591
Jordan Hall. 474
LOST: Brown billfold containing sum
of money and identification Satur-
day afternoon between campus and
Majestic. Reward. Edward Tripp
5663. 465
ROOMS for permanent, spring vaca-
tion or week-end rental. Phone
8544. 473
WANTED
WANTED: Three passengers to drive
southeast to vicinity of Georgia
Spring vacation. Call Mrs. Beebe.
7396. 472!

WJR
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports.
6:15--Dancing Moods.
6;:30- -Boake Carter.
6:45--Vocal varieties.
7:00-Poetic Melodies.
7:15-Hollywood Screens-COOp i
7::30--Gabriel Heat ter.
8:00--Kate Smith.
9:00--Major Bowes.
10:00-- Musical.
10:30-The Mummers.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15 -Aericans at Work.
11:30-Buddy Rogers Orch.
11 :45- Mediator.
12:00-Johnny Hamp's Orch
12 30--Dance Music.
WWj
P.M.
6:00--Tyson Sports.
6:15--Dixie Strings.
6 :30-Bradcast.
6:45-MusicalsMoments.
7:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
7:15-"House Party."
7 :45-Sport Review.
8:00--Rudy Vallee.
9:00-"Good News of 1935'
10:00-Kraft Music Hall.
11:00-Newscast.
11:10-WebsterHall Orch.
11:30-- -Dance Music.
12(:(00 Dance Music.
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-wheel of Chance.
6:30-The Witching Hour.
7 :00-Spdrtscast.
7:30-United Press Bulletins.
7 :45-Orchestra.
8:00-Sinfonietta.
8:30-Happy Hal's Housewarming.

9:00-To Be Announced.
9:30-Moonlight Rhythms.
10:00-H1ollywood Serenaders.
10:30--Henry Weber Music.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter,
11 :15-"Theatre Digest."
12:00--Dance Orch.
12:30--Kay Kyser Orch.
1:00---The Dawn Patrol.
WXYZ
P.M.
6:00--Day in Review.
6:15---'rhe Black Flame.
6 :30--Orchestra.
6:45-Lowell Thomas.
7 :00--Easy Aces.
7 :1 5-Mr Keen.
7:30--Green Hornet.
8:00-March of Time.
8:30--Barry McKinley.
9:00--Rochester Philharmonic.
9:30--American Town Meeting.
1(0:30-NBC Night Club.
11:00--John McKay.
11:30- Jimmy Grier.

SPONSORED AND DIRECTED BY The Students' International
Travel Association (known as SITA) a responsible, growing organ-
ization of students in the U.S. and 10 foreign countries, believing
in the educational value of travel, properly conceived and directed,
and seeking to make such travel available to as many students as
possible. Being international in scope it secures and passes on to
members remarkable savings on accommodations abroad.
Address applications and inquiries to: Dr. H. J. SKORNIA
Department of Romance Languages

MARSHALL Cut-Ra3te Druq
231 SOUTH STATE - Phone 9242 - 8 Doors North of Kresge's
TED'S DAILY DOUBLE-PRICES EFFECTIVE TODAY
50c
Salted Spanish Milox Toothpowder
Peanuts 29c
Contains Sodium Perborate
Half Pound . . . 6c with Milk of Magnesia

DRIVEWAYII
GRAVE L
KILLINS GRAVEL
COMPANY

heh
S Cll
1 S.
os f 11
1JI- I C 1 -j'
Jj 01
c0,1' C i A
dSIC
Three More
Performances!
..4 ILIA A

-. .. .

I

Dniiv Z:00-l4:00-l7 -nn-9m n m , l l 1 WOR

...,.)

elmaw

Telephone

7112

. - '

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- - _ _ ... _ I

The Deportment of Physical Education
for Wormen presents

I -r 1 A M E5 51 EWAR 1 r if

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