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March 20, 1938 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1938-03-20

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MAY FESTIVAL
SUPPLEMENT

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SECTION
TWO

7 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1938

45th Annual Music Festival
Anderson Back; Philadelphia

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l1 To

14;
Play

Negro Singer
Acclained By
Times' Writer
Iler Poise is Admirable,
He Finds At Her Debut
After European Tour
Understands Intent
Of EachComposer
EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is an
article which appeared in the New York
Times. written after Miss Anderson had
made an extended toer in Europe and
retrnd to Town Hall forna solo debut.
Let it be said at the outset: Marian
Anderson has returned to her native
land one of the great singers of our
time. The Negro contralto who has
been abroad for four years established
herself in her concert at Town Hall
last night as the possessor of an ex-
celling voice and art. Her singing en-
chanted an audience that included
singers. There was no doubt of it,I
she was mistress of all she surveyed.
The simple facts are better than
superlatives, for superlatives are
easily abused. Fact one, then, should
be the sheer magnificence of the voice
itself considered as a musical instru-
ment. It is a contralto of stunning
range and volume, managed with sup-
pleness and grace. It is a voice that.
lends itself to the entire emotional
gamut, responsive to delicate nuance
and able to swell out with opulence
and sonority.
Command of Style Penetrating
Fact twrshoUld fbe Miss Anderson's
musicianship. In a program that en-
compassed a full group of Handel,
another by Schubert, a Verdi aria,
a Finnish selection and a concluding
group of Negro spirituals, she re-
"ealed a penetrating command of
style. She understood not only the
difference in approach between the
songs of Handel, Schubert and Si-
belius, but the divergences in intent
in the music by the same composer.
Each song was treated as an artistic
unit, set forth with care, study and
intelligence.
But without deep feeling these
other assets would not achieve the
grandeur in interpretation that was
Miss Anderson's last night, and that
should be item three. For Miss An-
derson has the transcending quality.
of all authentic art-a genuine iden-
tification with the core of music.
Schubert's "Der Tod und Das .Maed-
chen," and "Allmacht" were en-
nobling in their grandeur. And how
many singers have communicated the
rapture of John Payne's "Crucifixion"
as Miss Anderson did last night. It
was music-making that was too deep
for words.
Had Poise, Even in Pain
To all these things must be added
the native good taste of the artist and
the simplicity of her personality. Here
was r;woman of poise and sensibility.
The fact that one foot, iiijured in an
accident on board ship on the way1
home, was encased n a cast was never
permitted to intrude on the listener's
consciousness. She sang with a con-
sciousness of her ability and with a
relish of her task that were positively
infectious.
It was possible for those of pedantic
minds to find minor mnatters to
(Continued on Page 3)
* . e

25

Program For The 1938 May Festival

Orchestra 1
Years With The Meg,
Marti1e'lli Feted Today

ol

8:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY
Soloist
MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
WOMEN'S VOICES of the CHORAL UNION
EUGENE ORMANDY and PROF. EARL V. MOORE,
Conductors
Herr Jesu Christ, ich weiss gar wohn.... Buxtehude
Vater Unser in Himmelreich ................. Bach
Fantasia in C major.....................Handel
Symphony in D major, No. 35 ("Haffner")
Kochel 385..........................Mozart
Allegro con spirito; Andante; Menuetto; Presto
"The Blessed Damozel" .................. Debussy
MARIAN ANDERSON
WOMEN'S CHORUS
"O Don Fatale" from "Don Carlos"..........Verdi
"Ah! mon fils" from "Le Profet"..........Meyerbeer
MARIAN ANDERSON
Afternoon of a Faun ...................... Debussy
Interlude and Dance from "La Vida Breve".. de Falla
8:30 p.m. THURSDAY
Soloists
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist
AGNES DAVIS, Soprana CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
ARTHUR HACKETT, TenorE
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRAf
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EUGENE ORMANDY and PROF. EARL V. MOORE,
Conductors
ALL-RUSSIAN PROGRAM
Overture to "Kowantchina"...........Moussorgsky
"The Bells'................ . ........Rachmaninoff
I. The Silver Bells - Allegro ma non tanto
ARTHUR HACKETT and Chorus.
II. The Golden Bells - Lento
AGNES DAVIS and Chorus
II. The Brazen Bells - Presto
CHORUS
IV. The Mournful Bells - Lento lugubre
CHASE BAROMEO and Chorus
Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, for,
Piano and Orchestra ............... Tschaikowsky
Allegro non troppo emolto maestoso; Allegro con
spirito
Andantino semplice
Allegro con fuoco
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN
2:30 p.m. FRIDAY
Soloists
ALBERT SPALDING, Violinist
HARDIN VAN DEURSEN, Baritone
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
EUGENE ORMANDY and JUVA HIGBEE,
conductors
Overture to "The Bartered ,Bride"........Smetana
The Virgin's Slumber Song .............. Reger
The Snow-Drop .................... Gretchaninoff
In These Delightful Pleasant Groves.......Purcell
It Was a Lover and His Lass...............Morley
YOUNG PEOPLES FESTIVAL CHORUS
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice"..............Dukas
Cantata, "Paul Bunyan" (First Performance) James
HARDIN VAN DEURSEN
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
Concerto in D major, Op. 77, for Violin and
Orchestra .............................Brahms
Allegro non troppo; Adagio;
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace.
ALBERT SPALDING

8:30 p.m. FRIDAY
Soloist
NINO MARTINI, Tenor
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue in B minor.............Bach
(Orchestrated by Lucien Cailliet)
"Una furtiva largima," from "Elisir d'amore"
... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Donizetti
"Racconto di Rodolfo," from "La Bolieme".Puccini
NINO MARTINI
Symphony No. 5 in E-flat..................Sibelius
Tempo molto moderato-Allegro moderato
ma un poco stretto-Presto---plu presto
Andante mosso quasi allegretto
Allegro molto-Un pochettino largamente
"O Paradiso!" from "L'Africana......... Meyerbeer
"E lucevan la stelle" from "Tosca"........... Puccini
MR. MARTINI
Perpetual Motion.....................Paganini
(Orchestrated by Eugene Ormahdy)
"Till Eulenspiegel"... ..................... Strauss
2:30 p.m. SATURDAY
Soloist
MARJORIE LAWRENCE, Soprano
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
ALL WAGNER PROGRAM
"Rheingold"
a. Invocation of Alberich
b. Entrance of the Gods into Walhalla
"Walkure"
a. Du bist der Lenz
b. Hoi yo to ho te
MARJORIE LAWRENCE
c. Wotan's Farewell and the Magic Fire Music
"Siegfried"
a. Wald weben
b. Siegfied Ascending the Mountain to Meet
Brunnhilde; and Finale
"Gotterdammerung"
a. Rhine Journey
b. Funeral March
c. Immolation and Closing Scene
MISS LAWRENCE
8:30 p.m. SATURDAY
Soloists
BRUNA CASTAGNA, Contralto
HILDA BURKE, Soprano
AGNES DAVIS, Soprano
RICHARD BONELLI, Bariton
CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Tenor
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
"CARMEN" (in Concert Form) ............... Bizet
CARMEN .................. BRUNA CASTAGNA
Micaela and Frasquita .......... HILDA BURKE
Mercedes ........................AGNES DAVIS
Don Jose............GIOVANNI MARTINELLI
Escamillo .................. RICHARD BONELLI
Morales and Zuniga........CHASE BAROMEO
Dancario.................MAURICE GEROW
Ramendado ............... ARTHUR HACKETT

GIOVANNI MARTINELLI

Eighteen Colleagues To Participate In The Program
With Proceeds Going To Opera Fund; His Recent
Collapse On 'Met' Stage First In Long Career

By ROY INGHAM
Giovanni Martinelli's 25th year'
with the Metropolitan will be the oc-
casion for a gala party in his honor
today at the famous Opera House on
Seventh Avenue.
Eighteen of his best friends and
members of the Company will pre-
sent a program in which Martinelli
will sing three numbers. Some of
them are: Kirsten Flagstad, Elizabeth
Rethberg, Helen Jepson, Marjorie
Lawrence, Richard Crooks, Frederick
Jagel, Lawrence Tibbett and Ezio
Pinza. The artists are contributing
their services and the proceeds of the
performance will go to the Fund to
Maintain Metropolitan Opera.
Today also marks the third week of
his convalescing following a collapse
as he sang "Celeste Aida" before the
Met and a nation-wide radio au-
dience: the first time he ever let his
followers down.
With dramatic suddenness, Fred-
erick Jagel, listening to the program
at the time, hurried to the scene and
finished the part.
Usually Careful With Food
Odd fact about the collapse, which
resultede from indigestion, is the an-
nouncement that he is usually care-
ful in selecting and preparing his
foods-he has a special chef. Crab-
meat, -eaten before he was to sing,
caused his collapse, doctors say.
Since 1913, when he first appeared
as Rodolfo the poet, in Puccini's "La
Boheme," his name has meant SRO
at the old playhouse. His rise in

American operatic and recital circles
is an inspiration to the musically
ambitious, marked with variety and
good fortune.
Eldest of a small town cabinet mak-
er's 14 children, Martinelli early
leaned to music in the local church
choir and sporadic essays atthe
clarinet.
Papa's wish it was that he follow
the family trade, but at 20, he went
into the Italian army to do duty for
two years. He soon becapte a part
of the four-piece band attached to
his unit and vocalized a bit off duty.
His Colonel Advised Music
It was his colonel, who advised him
to study, that gave needed inspira-
tion. A wealthy Milan family spon-
sored his two-year study in Milan.
He made his debut Dec. 3, 1910, in
Rossini's "Stabat Mater" and success
was immediate. A fortnight later he
sang his first operatic part in "Er-
nani."
Puccini soon noticed him and as-
signed the lead in a European pre-
miere of "The Girl of the Golden
West" in Rome. Engagements fol-
lowed rapidly in the musical capitals
of Europe.
Gatti-Casazza, late director of the
Metropolitan, heard Martinelli in
Rome during 1913 and signed him to
a contract to appear in "La Boheme"
in the fall of that year.
The highlight of his 25 seasons
with the Met was his elevation into
the role of "Eleazar" after Enrico
Caruso died.
"Q W_* 1

7 Opera Stars;
Noted Soloists
Are Scheduled
iartin lii Sings; Spaldn
dWillPlay; Chorus Gives
'Patti Bunyan' Premiere
Lawrence To Sing
WagnerProgram
From the opening "Herr Jesu
Christ, ich weips gar wohn" to the
final curtain of "Carmen," the Uni-
versity Musical Society brings to its
45th annual May Festival 14 soloists,
seven of them from the Metropolitan
Opera Company. The six concert
series will begin at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 11 in Hill Auditorium and
end Saturday evening.
For the third successive year it will
be the famed Philadelphia Or-
chestra, conducted by Eugene Or-
mandy, that will provide the ac-
companimerit for these artists and
play most of the selections. The
Choral Union and Young People's
Festival Chorus will also participate.
Advance tickt reservations indi-
cate a capacity turnout for the event,
President Charles A. Sink of the
School of Music announced. Reser-
vations will be open by mail or on
personal application to the music
school offices. The date for over-the-
counter sales has not yet been set, he
said.
Anderson Opens Serries
When she replaced Nelson Eddy
at a Choral Union concert last year,
Marian Anderson, contrailto, received
such acclaim that she was chosen to
open the 1938 Festival.
Juva Higbee's Young People's Fes-
tival Chorus will present the world
premiere of Dorothy James's Can-
tata, "Paul Bunyan,"o at the third
concert Friday, May 13. More than
400 voices of Ann Arbor high school
students will be heard.
This season's program will feature
five stars more than did last year's
which drew a capacity audience.
Chase Baromeo, University alum-
nus, will sing "The Mournful Bells,"
from Rachmaninoff's "The Bells" in
the second concert Thursday and will
take part in the concert form of
"Carmen" Saturday.
Miss Anderson, the Philadelphia
Orchestra, under Eugene Ormandy,*
and the women's voices of the Choral
Union will open the series with a
varied program at 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 11.
Russian Program Second
An All-Russian program, in which
Rachmaninoff's "Bells" will be heard,
comprises the second concert Thurs-
day evening. Soloists ace Agnes Da-
vis, soprano, Prof. Artur Hackett
of the music school, tenor, Mr. Baro-
meo, bass, and Artur Rubinstein,
pianist. The Philadelphia Orchestra
and the Choral Union will again par-
ticipate.
Prof. Hardin Van Deursen of the
music school, baritone, will sing the
lead in Miss James's "Paul Bunyan"
with the Young People's Festival
Chorus at the Friday afternoon pro-
gram. Albert Spalding, violinist, will
play Brahms' "Concerto iki D major,
Op. 77 for Violin and Orchestra."
Screen and radio favorite Nino
Martini, tenor, will sing arias from
two of Puccini's operas "Tosca" and
"La Boheme," in the fourth concert
Friday evening. From the former he
has chosen "E lucevan le stelle" and
from the latter, "Racconto di Ro-
dolfo."
Laurence In Wagner Arias
An All-Wagner program at 2:30

p.m.Saturday will feature Marjorie
Lawrence, Metropolitan Opera so-
prano, in selections from "Walkure"
and "Gotterdammerung," while the
Philadelphia group plays excerpts
from "Rheingold" and "Siegfried."
Metropolitan Opera stars will close
the Festival series Saturday evening
when they join the University Choral
Union and the Philadelphia Orches-
tra in a concert version of "Carmen."
Bruna Castagna will sing the role
of Carmen. The complete cast fol-
lows: Micaela and Frasquita by Hilda
4 rke, Mercedes hy ALnav 'r'i.

I

No

rtes On Stars And Near Stars
By The Daily's Music Editor

By WILLIAM J. LICHTENWANGER in her death dive over the three-foot
PLACE: The stage of the National j wall!
Now that we've introduced the sub-

Theatre in Praha.
TIME: Late in the third act of
Puccini's To,a. The scene is Carava-
dossi's prison cell, just at dawn before
the hero is to be executed. Tosca,1
played by a prima donna of conven-
tionally ample proportions, enters
and tells her lover that she has mur-
dered his chief captor after seduc-
tively obtaining papers for his re-
lease. Comes a tender love scene,
then Caravadossi is led away to what
is supposed to be a fake execution.,
But their plans go astray. Carava-
dossi is really executed, and just as
Tosca realizes that he is not acting
but really dead soldiers enter,tde-
nouncing her as a murderess. With
a last long look at her lifeless lover,
La Tosca flings aside the soldiers
and hurls herself over the castle wall
to a stony death below.
As the orcnestra brings down the
curtains with its dramatic chords the
great audience is at once overcome-
but is it with heart-rending grief,
symnathetic sorrow at this tragic

ject so gracefully, perhaps it will be
all right to tell the one about Violetta
of the Misplaced Curves, or The Girl
Who Got Her Signals Crossed. Yes,'
it was Verdi's Traviata, that was be-
ing played, and it seems that the of-
fered Violetta was rounder of voice
than of bodily contour. Hoopskirts
offered ample illusion for the territory
below the equator, but a flat chest is
out of place in even a consumptive
heroine, and so the stage manager
decided that the miraculous art of
the costumiere would have to be
I called 'in to make the young lady
topographically symmetrical. Dis-
creetly and delicately said manager
suggested to the singer that she go
to the wardrobe mistress and ask for
No. 17. The hint was taken and pre-
sently the girl returned, so altered
in size, shape, and form as to com-
pletely dumbfounded her adviser.
"What in the world have you done
to yourself?" he demanded.
"Why, you said to ask for No. 71,
so I got it and put it on."
"No. 71 indeed!" exploded the stage
manager. "I said No. 17. What you've

1938 Program
Is One Of Note,
President Says
Sink Praises Local Public
For Its Support In Past;
Encouraging To Sociny
By CHARLES A. SINK
(President of the School of Music)
Brilliant substantial programs, in-
terpreted by artists and organizations
of outstanding reputation, will char-
acterize the six programs of the
Forty-Fifth Annual May Festival of
the University of Michigan to be held
May 11, 12, 13 and 14, 1938. Seven
leading celebrities of the Metropolitan
Opera Association and other singers
of note, as well as instrumentalists of
renown will participate in the solo
roles. The Philadelphia Orchestra
will be heard in all six concerts.
It is a significant fact that for
forty-five years the Festival has con-
tinued without interruption. Panic,
wars, depressions and recessions,
while injecting numerous problems
difficult of solution, have not cur-
tailed the artistic effectiveness of
the event. This has been due in
large measure to a sympathetic and
loyal public, which has ever care-
fully guided the prestige of Michigan's
gala musical event. Through the years

i ( 1r17 "11 Y1 if1P V p17 f e[
[1

Ljv 1 vunt'1 TUC s VY resevn1I11u I1L
Premiere Of 'Paul Bunyan' Tale
By MALCOLM LONG coming to the North country "to 'and
Paul Bunyan, Babe, the big blue ox, a place where Babe could grow."
and the time of the Blue Snow, right The solo part of Paul will be sung
out -f Michigan tradition and the by Professor Hardin Van Deursen of
fairy tale books, will be the subjects the School of Music while most of
of a cantata whose premiere will be! the stoy is Musd c he nrs in

presented by the Young People's Fes-
tival Chorus at the Friday afternoon
concert of the May Festival.
"Paul Bunyan" by Dorothy James.
professor of theory at the Ypsilanti,
State Normal College, is to be sung
by 400 fifth and sixth grade pupils
from the public grade schools of Ann
Arbor. Miss James has done consider-

simple two and three parts with some
in unison.
The chorus will also sing four art
numbers: "It Was a Lover and His
Lass" by Morley, "In These Delight-
ful, Pleasant Groves" by Purcell, "The
Snowdrop" by Gretchaninoff and
"The Virgin's Slumber Song" by Re-
aer.

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