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March 16, 1938 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1938-03-16

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OAG TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MMAUCH 16, 1938

FAGE TWO WEDNESDAY, MAR
______________________________________________________________________________________ I

Automotive,
Physics Parley
EndsMeeting
importance Of Physics In
Industry Is Stressed By
Business Executive
The importance of physical re-
search in the use of rubber for the
automotive industry was stressed yes-
terday by W. F. Busse, Goodrich
Rubber Company Research manager,
in the opening speech on the second
day's program of the physics-au-
tomobile industry symposium.
The meeting, under the auspices of
the department of physics and the
American Institute of Physics, rep-
resented the initial efforts on the part
of physicists and industrial engineers
to work in closer harmony. In the
feature address of the symposium
Monday night in the Union, Charles
F. Kettering, vice-president and di-
rector of the research laboratories of
General Motors, told the group that
industry needed many technical im-
provements and they should originate
in university physics departments.
Opening the morning's program in
Hutchins Hall, Mr. Busse spoke on
"The Physics of Rubber as Related
to the Automobile."
0. J. Horger, research engineer
for the Timken Roller Bearing Com-
pany, next addressed the group on
"Photoelastic Analysis Practically
Applied to Design Problems."
City Drafts Bill In
Restaurant Drive
(Continued from Page 1)
classifications" in a conspicuous
place." This plan was recommended
in the hope that as many restaurants
as possible will strive to improve their
sanitary conditions and receive high
sanitary ratings.
Dr. John A. Wessinger of the board
of. health said, "I believe this mea,
sure is very advisable, since it gives
us something legal to fall back on."
Others persent at the meeting were
Dr. John Sundwall, Dr. Theron Lang-
ford of the board of health, Alderman
Uax Krutsch, Glen Ault and Clare
E. Griffin, City Attorney William M.
Laird and Franklin Fiske, sanitarian.
Russian Trials Are
Discussion Subject
(Continued from Page 1)
harin, once editor and chronicleer of
the Revolution, against whom his
former papers have bitterly turned;
Rakovsky, former ambassador to
France; Yagoda, former secret police
head; and several important physi-
cians charged with killing politically
important Communists as well as the
Menshevist, Maxim Gorky.
This fourth and latest of the trials,
Dr. Stanton emphasized, has aroused
severe criticism of the Soviet regime
by some, causing disbelief in the for-
merly accepted aims and aspirations
of the Communists in Russia. The
trials appear, however, he said, when
perceived from the traditional Rus-
sian point of view as agents in the
eventual fulfillment of these aims,
embodied in the creation of a social-
istic democracy.

'While Thousands Cheer'-Der Fuehrer Takes Possession

Submit Housing
Plea To Regents
On Rent Issue
(Continued from Page 1)

A million flag-waving, cheering persons greeted Adolf Hitler when the German Chancellor arrived in
Vienna to receive the homage of the Austrian capital. As the cavalcade of 70 cars drove down the Ringstrasse,
chief theroughfare of the conquered city, Hitler stood in his open auto. This picture was sent from Vienna
to London by telephoto, and to New York by radio.

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EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the B3ule:tin is c osI m e"i-uc' otie to all nunnb-rs of the
University. Copy received at he office of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.

1 1

WJR
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports
6:15-Let's Celebrate.
6 :30-Boake Carter.
6:45-Lumand Abner.
7:00-Poetic Melodies
7:15-Hobby Lobby
7:45-Melody and Rhythm.
8:00-Cavalcade of America.
8:30-Eddie Cantor
9:00-Andre Kostelanetz.
9:30-Ben Bernie Orch.
10:00-Gang fusters
10:30-Diesel Flashes.
10:35-Barry Ward - Songs.
10:45-Musical.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-Reminiscing.
11;45--Solay
12:00-Johnny Hamp's Orch.
12:30-Dance Music
WWJ
P.M.
6:00-Tyson Sports
6 :15-Sophisto-Kats.
6 :30-Bradcast
6:45-Soloist.
7:00-Amos 'n' Andy
7:15-Kottler Conducts
7:45-Sport Review.
8 :00-One Man's, Family
8:30-Tommy Dorsey's Orch.
9:00-Town Hall Tonight.
10:00-Your Hollywood Parade.
11:00-Newscast
11:10-Webster Hall Orch.
11:30-Horace Heidts Orch.
12:00- Dance Music
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-Ruby and His Music.
6:15-News and Sports
6:30-Exciting Moments.
6:45-Happy Joe "Quiz."
7:00--Fulton Lewis, Jr.
7:15-Wings Over the World.
7:30-United Press News
7 :45-Mercy Hall.
8:00-U.S. Marine Band.
8:30-Happy Hal's Housewarming.
9:00--The Red Ledger.
9:30-Spotlight Parade.
10:00-Symphonic Strings.
10:30-Melodies from the Skies
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter
11 :15-Dance Music.
11:30-Jimmy Dorsey's Music.
12:00-Guy Lombardo Orch.
WXYZ
P.M.
6:00-Day in Review
6:15-Black Flame.
6:30--Baseball Extra.
6:45-Lowell Thomas
7:00-Easy Aces
7:15-Keen Tracer.
7:30-Lone Ranger
8 :00-Roy Shield.
8:30-Harriet Parsons
9:00--Cleveland Orchestra.
10:00-Michigan Highways.
10:15-Nola Day.
10:30--NBC Minstrel Show.
11:00-The Ink Spots.
11:15-Dance Orch.
11:30-Eddy Duchin's Orch.
12 :00-Graystone Dance Music

I, n nrm Hr w s nr v

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 1938
VOL. XLVIII. No. 119
Faculty of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: The five-
week freshman reports will be due
March 19, Room 4, University Hall.
A meeting of the Senate Commit-

mation, 201 Mason Hall. Office
hours: 19-2 and 2-4.
Academic Notices
Metal Processing 5, (Welding). The
regular monthly meeting of the De-
troit Section of the American Weld-
(Continued on Page 4)

excessive as compared to the level of
rents in portions of Ann Arbor outside
the University area.
The explanation for this discrep-
ancy appears to lie in certain re-
strictions which the University has
placed upon the free action of com-
petition in adjusting rents to an,
equitable level. In order to maintain
its policy of approving rooming
houses the University has agreed to
enforce contracts for an entire se-
mester. These contracts have neces-
sarily been consummated during the
tension surrounding the opening days
of school because of the students'
desire to secure accommodations, be-
cause of the rumors of a room short-
age which always circulate and be-
cause a permanent Ann Arbor ad-
dress is necessary in order to register.
Since the University has contribut-
ed to the natural shortage of rooms
through its building policy and is
known to be contemplating further
expansion in the future, we feel that
in justice to the students all steps
which tend to decrease the cost of
housing and improve the quality
should be taken. We feel that the ad-
vantages to the male student body
of an approved list are counterbal-
anced by the abuses and the way
to correct this situation is for the
University to refrain from enforcing
Contracts. Such landladies as desire
to remain upon the approved list
under that status are ,tobe permitted
to do so. We therefore respectfully
petition the Board of Regents to re-
duce the number of approved houses
in which contracts will be enforced
to a number sufficient to accommo-
date the incoming freshman class, a
move which we feel will tei. to re-
store competition and result in lower
rents and improved living conditions
Michigan State To Offer
Marital Problem Course
EAST LANSING, March 15.-P)-
Michigan State College officials saic
today that a course on marriage prob.
lems will be given senior girls nex
term.
Dr. Lydia Lightring, of the women';
physical education department, wh
will conduct the course, said th
course will consist of a series of lec
tures by off-campus figures. Tho
course is optional and carries no cred-
it with it.
COUNTY LIBRARY PROPOSED
The proposal for a Washtenay
County Library was approved last
week at a meeting of librarians fron
all over the county, held in the offic(
of Superintendent of Schools Otto W
Haisley.
rf

Dr. Van Ingen
Prepares Book
Volume Will Be Printed1
By University Press
"Figurines from Seleucia on the
Tigris" by Dr. Wilemina van Ingen
of Wheaton College is about to go to
the printers as a publication of the
University Press, Dr. Frank E. Rob-
bins, managing editor of the press,
announced yesterday.
Dr. var. Ingen, a member of the
staff of the University until three
years ago, was a- research assistant
and later a research associate here.
She did much work in cataloguing
Greek vases, and the latter part of
her stay here did research work on
figurines.
The book for the most part is a
catalogue and will be illustrated by
many plates. "It will be a contribu-
tion to a division of archeology that
i has not been dealt with much be-
fore " Dr. Robbins\ said.
He also announced the second
printing from the original plates of
Volume 16 of the Humanistic Series,
published by the Press in 1926.
This volume deals with Miomachus
of Gerasa, the translation of whose
work was done by Martin Luther
D'Ooge. Besides the translation is a
study in Greek arithmetic by Dr.
Robbins and Prof. Louis C. Karpinski
of the mathematics department.

i ----n

REGISTRATION CLOSES
Registration for the April 4 elec-
tion closed last right at City Hall
In addition to voting for ward offices
of aldermen, supervisor and con-
stable, the electors will give their
opinion on the proposed construction
of a new county building, provided
WPA funds are available to finance
part of the project.
Going Under
--
We'lI keep you up-
Try our complete
Dinner for only
40c-
THE NEW DEAL POLICY
i RUG~R'S
DELICATESSEN
RESTAURANT
r on State Street at Liberty

I

tee on University Affairs will be held -_-_
at 4:10 p.m., Wednesday, March 16. P'aI.s For Seco n
C. W. Edmunds, Chairman.

I

I. r ,t

Wanted: Experienced Camp Coun- i
sellors for Summer Camp. Apply at(
Employment Bureau, Room 2, Univer- (Continued from Page 1)
sity Hall for further information been attempting to finance a new
J. A. Bursley, Dean of Students. swimming pool for women. Since the
so-called "bath-tub" in Barbour gym-
Students of the College of Litera- salled ub in Babur gym
ture, Science, and the Arts: A meet- place but the Michigan bnion pool
ing will be held on Thursday, March for the women to swim in.
17, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 1025 Angell The University Band is-seeking
Hall for students in the College of funds so that it can make the trip
Literature, Science, and the Arts and to Yale next fall with the,-football
others interested in future work in team. Band members are reported
medicine. The meeting will be ad- to seeking to make new Head Foot-
!dressed by Dean A. C. Furstenberg ball Coach Fritz Crisler's first visit
of the Medical School. The next talk back to the East a real triumphal
in this vocational series will be given tour.
on Tuesday, March 22, by Dean C. E. Rader announced last night that
Griffin of the School of Business the committee chairmen are to select
Administration. their committees before the next
Summer Work: The Camp Place- central committee meeting at 7:15
ment Unit of the New York State p.m. i th Union.
Employment Service is interested in
registering young men and women Duce's Error Was Not
for possible referral to counseling
jobs in summer camps. People ful- Forming Balkan Union
filling the following requirements are
asked to call at 201 Mason Hall for __ ____________ ___1 _
application forms. sible this embankment by undermin-
Home Residence: in the City of ing and battering the Little Entente.
New York in the Counties of West- As a result, he said, Czechoslovakia,
chester, Putnam, Nassau or Suffolk of which should have been the chief ally
I New York State or in other states. of Italy, is doomed and Italy must
Availability for an interview at now become the maidservant of eith-
New York office before June 1. er Germany or England and France,
Age, not under 20, preferably 21. instead of leading a federation which
Qualifications, one summer coun- would have held the balance of pow-
seling experience, outstanding per- er in Europe.
sonal qualifications for camp work, Professor Salvemini is of the opin-
At least one or two skills. Life sav- ion that Chamberlain is in full ac-
ing certificate is advisable. cord with Hitler's plan to swallow
Head counselors, dietitians, nurses Czechoslovakia. As proof in point, he
and physicians are also placed pointed out that two days ago in the
through the New York Employment House of Commons, Chamberlain ig-
Service. nored a question asking what he
University Bureau of Appoint- would do if Germany attacked'
ments and Occupational Infor- Czechoslovakia.

H I L I
pr
ANNUAL
WINNER of
by E
During the past t
lished themselves
groups of the Uni
have successfully
The choice of "R
of selecting th
LYDIA ME
Fri. & Sat., Mar.
Matinee, M

LEL PLAYERS
esent their
MAJOR PRODUCTION
"y
1937 HOPWOOD AWARD
dith G. Whitesell
en years, the Hillel Players have estab-
as one of the foremost theatrical
iversity. For the past five years, they
produced the Hopwood Award winners.
,OTS" is a continuation of the policy
e best of the student-written plays.
.NDELSSOHN THEATRE
18-19 Prices 35c - 50c
larch 19th Evenings 8:30

I

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m

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il.

THESE ORGANIZATIONS HAVE CONTRACTED
FOR THEIR PAGE IN THE 1938 MICHIGANENSIAN!

Is Yours

Among

GENERAL SORORITIES

cl s- e4-

FOR SALE

suite inside bathing cap in

Main

THE BAKED GOODS Exchange holds
a sale of home-baked foods every
Thursday at Harris Hall from 10-4.
Eclairs - individual pies - cookies
cakes-fried chicken. 420
WASHED SAND and Gravel. Drive-
way Gravel. Killins Gravel Co.
Phone 7112. 7x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
NOTICES
MEN and women are offered the
highest cash prices for their dis-
carded clothing. See Claude Brown,
512 S. Main. Phone 2-2736. 388
LADIES tailoring and dress-making;
formals, suits, coat relining, all al-
terations. Expert service, reasonable
rates, work guaranteed. 320 E. Lib-
erty. Call evenings. 2-2020. 8x
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any,
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
Ments. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold bracelet with locket
hbaring Michigan seal and initials:-

Library.
2-2591.

Reward. B.

Anderson.
454

I

FOR RENT
LARGE front rooms, $4 double, $3
single. Housekeeping suite $5.50. 420
Washington Heights. Phone 3828.
453
FOR RENT: East Side furnished
room and bath for business or grad-
uate student. Phone 8213. Evenings
7746. 452

MARSHALL Cut-Rate Dru q
231 SOUTH STATE -Phone 9242 - 8 Doors North of Kresge s
TED'S DAILY DOUBLE PRICES EFFECTIVE TODAY--

$1.00 KURLASH 55c1
25c Tweezers . . . 21c

50c W IX .... 39c
Large TAMPAX . . . 33c

BEER ... 2 for 25c WINES --- CHAMPAGNES- -
S YOU'LL FALL MN
P LOVE ITFi JOAN TODA
a ALL OVER AGIM
><<<><> 'w hen you see her
teamed with Spence Tracy
in this sensational new
love drama by the aiuthor {
of "Red Headed WOmln "! :
KATHERINE
BRUSH'S

Alpha Chi Omega
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Alpha Gamma Delta
Alpha Omicron Pi
Alpha Phi
Alpha Xi Delta
Chi Omega
Collegiate Sorosis
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Gamma
Gamma Phi Beta
Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Delta
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Phi Sigma Sigma
Pi Beta Phi
Zeta Tau Alpha.
PROFESSIONAL
SORORITIES
Sigma Alpha Iota
GENERAL FRATERNITIES
Acacia
Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Kappa Lambda
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Psi
Chi Phi
Delta Tau Delta

Phi Beta Pi
Phi Epsilon Pi
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Kappa Sigma
Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Tau
Phi Sigma Delta
Phi Sigma Kappa
Pi Lambda Phi
Psi Upsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Mu
Sigma Chi
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Theta Chi
Theta Delta Chi
Theta Xi
Triangle
Trignon
Zeta Beta Tau
PROFESSIONAL
FRATERNITIES
Alpha Chi Sigma
Alpha Kappa Psi
Alpha Omega
Alpha Rho Chi
Delta Sigma Delta
Delta Sigma Pi
Nu Sigma Nu
Phi Chi
Phi Delta Upsilon
Phi Rho Sigma
Theta Kappa Psi
Xi Psi Phi

Them?
American Institute of
Chemical Engineers
American Society of
Civil Engineers
American Society of
Mechanical Engineers
Architectural Society
Athena
Barristers
Congress - IMO
Michigan Daily
Engineering Honor Comm.
Freshman Medical Class
Galens
Junior Engineering Class
Junior Medical Class
La Sociedad Hispanica
Men's Council
Michigamua
Michigan Union
Mortarboard
Panhellenic Association
Phi Alpha Kappa
Phi Eta Sigma
Quarterdeck Society
Senior Education Class
Senior Engineering Class
Scabbard and Blade
School of Music, Senior
Class
Soph. Engineering Class
Soph. Class - L.S. & A.
Sphinx
Student Religious Assn.
Tau Beta Pi
Theta Sigma Phi
Triangles
University Band

11

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