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March 11, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIG.&. a~.A aAN' . 'DAILY~.4= s

TW__ __CIT7~N DAL

AcademyPlans
43rd Meeting
For March 17
Eminent Scholars To Talk
At Sessions; To Be Open
To The General Public
The 43rd Annual Meeting of the
Michigan Academy of Science, Arts
and Letters, March 17, 18 and 19,
will bring to Ann Arbor outstanding
scholars and speakers from many uni-
versities, and will consist of 14 sep-
arate meetings and luncheons.
The entire program, for which an-
nouncements have already been dis-
tributed, will be open to the public
except for the meeting of the academy
at 3 p.m. Saturday, March 14.
Among prominent speakers who
will take part in the session are Dr.
Allen H. Hansen of the Graduate.
School of Public Administration at
Harvard, Stanard G. Burguist of
Michigan State College and Dr. Mich-
ael Heidelberger of Columbia Univer-
sity.
Dr. D. W. Gudakunst,.State Com-
misaioner of Health, will speak at the
medical luncheon March 18, while
Commissioner William A. Brownrigg
of the newly-organized State Civil
Service Commission will speak before
the history and political science group
at their luncheon on the same day.
French Club Members
Hear Knudson Speak
Charles A. Knudson of the romance
languages department W"as guest
speaker at a regular meeting of the
Cercle Francais last night in the
League. Refreshments were served
after the speech.
Miss Thelma B. Lewis of the School
of Music will sing some old French
songs at the March 24, meeting ac-
cording to Martha Dynes, '39, presi-
dent of the club.
ENJOY A REAL
ITALIAN DINNER
1602 Packard Rd. at Marion St.
Dinners served daily by
reservation. Sunday from 12-8.

Work Starts On Mall Between
Graduate School And Library

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Heckscher Treats
of Mercantilism,
Planned Economy
Considerable affinity but very little
dentity exists between the ideas of
mercantilism and present-day "plan-
ned economy," Prof. Eli F. Heckscher,
president of the Economics Institute l
of Sweden, said yesterday in a
University lecture in Room C, Haven
Hall.
Both mercantilism and planned
economy oppose the state's undertak-
ing specific industrial activities,
Professor Heckscher said, but "favor
some direction from above." He
characterized both as being essential-
ly nationalistic, restrictive in their
importing. and protectionist as re-
gards international trade.
The two policies differ, Professor
Heckscher statedsi that "public
'functions were often performed then
by private initiative under mercan-
tilism, while they are not today; mer-
cantilism tended to emancipate the
individual, a planed economy does
not; and mercantilism was based on
floating capital, hile present-day
economies are based on fixed capi-
tal."
Professor Heckscher will speak on
"The Economic History of Sweden"
at 4:15 p.m. today in Room C, Haven
Hall.
School's Needs
To Be Viewed
Moehlman Will Discuss

Studio Obtains
German Device
For Recording
The University Broadcasting Stu-
dio is soon to be equipped with a new
type of disk and new high fidelity
recording equipment from which to
make student voice recordings, it was
announced yesterday.
The new disk, imported from Ger-
many. is called a Gelatin record and
its use will cut the price of individual
recordings in half, it was said. The
disk, closely resembling sheet cellu-
loid, is not expected to be as per-
manent as the acetate disk now in
use but will be appropriate for voice
testing..
The studio now has made over 600
recordings of student voices in its
laboratory.
I AIEE Elects Officers

Dickinson1Uesei'ibes
British Unionization
(Continued from Page 1)
lective bargaining is not a right of
labor, Prof. Dickinson declared.
Several types of machinery gov-
ern the relationships between em-
ployer and worker as regards wages
and industrial disputes, Professor
Dickinson said. First, there are the
trade boards, analogous to our state
minimum wage boards. These are
national in extent and are set up
under the ministry of labor.
Second, there are national statutes
regulating wages in such industries as
m miring and agriculture. And third,
i Joint Industrial Council, exist as vol-
untary bodies of representatives of
trade unions and employers' associa-
tions.

Library Shows
Exhibit In Rare
Wood Carvings
Wood carvings used as book illus-
trations are being shown in an exhibit
in the show-cases in the main cor-
ridor of the General Library this
week.
Using books from the library's gen-
eral and rare book collections as il-
lustrations, Ella M. Hymans, curator
s of rare books, has arranged the ex-
hibit, attempting to present a
graphic history of the art of wood
engraving found in literature. On
display are examples of "block books,"
I in which the earliest wood cuts ap-
peared in books, and the Nuremberg
Chronicle, printed in 1493, contain-
ing 1809 woodcuts.
The first edition of Euclid, the first
book to be printed with mathematical
diagrams, is shown, and the exhibit
is brought up to date with Bewick,
of the 19th century, who revolution-
ized the process, wood cuts in peri-
odicals of the same century.

Dental
New

Experiments
Source Of

Find
Decay

Work on landscaping and reloca-
tion of walks in preparation for com-
pletion of a Central Mall for the cam-
pus is now being carried on through
funds totalling $30,000 and appro-1
priated jointly by the University and
the WPA.
The accompanying picture shows
the north portion of the Mall, which
will run on a direct line from the
center of the General Library through
the parking site between the Natural
Science Building and the Chemistry
Building, across N. University be-
tween Hill Auditorium and the
League, terminating at the Graduate
School Building. The building shown
behind Hill Auditorium and the Caril-
lon is the proposed new School of
Music Building.
Coops To Be Subject
Of Broadcast On WJR
The Ann Arbor Cooperative move-
ment will be the subject for the Uni-
versity of the Air broadcast at 3 p.m.
today over station WJR.
The script was writen by members
of the Rochdale house in cooperation
with other cooperative organizations.
The subject of the skit will be an open
house at which the work of the Ann
Arbor Cooperative Society, the new
medical cooperative, the Wolverine
and the Rochdale, Socialist and Girls'
Cooperative houses will be discussed.

The Central Mall will be approxi-
mately 1,400 feet in length, with
a width between buildings on the old
campus of 250 feet and on the new
part of 100 feet wider.
The work now being done will,
straighten out what is now S. Ingalls
Street, which has always been slightly.
off line from a direct perpendicular
to N. University Ave. Workmen are
actively engaged in the project at
present, moving 52 trees to be - re-
placed after two ,oadways, each
twenty-eight feet wide flanking a cen-
tral park, become a reality. Each
of these roadways will be a one-way
street, and parking will be allowed on
each thus doing much to alleviate the
present parking problem around the
campus.
The final step in the development
of the Central Mall will be, as indi-
cated, the erection of the School of
Music Building.
Pharmacists Given
AdviceBy Lewis
Decrying the dual role of druggist
and soda jerker which the modern
professional pharmacist is forced to
play in the commercial drug store,
Prof. Howard B. Lewis of the School
of Pharmacy advised pharmacy grad-
uates to seek employment in either
hospital or manufacturing pharmacy
in yesterday's vocational lecture..
Opportunities in all phases of phar-
macy are rapidly widening, due to
the increasingly strict requirements
which state laws are placing upon en-
trance to the profession, Prof. Lewis
said.
DATE CORRECTION
The correct date for the Adult
Education Series planned by the Uni-
versity Extension Division should be
May 24-28, rather than March' 24-28,
as it appeared in Wednesday's Daily.,

'1
.
:
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Worster New Chairman (Continued,'r
The American Institute of Elec- ceptibility to caries
trical Engineers last night elected a of over 80 per cent.
new slate of officers. John Worster, There is a wide
'39E, was chosen as chairman, Don- sponse to treatmen
ald S. Peck, '39E, as vice-chairman, tients it, is necessa
Dayton O. Slater, '39E, secretary, Hil- typical diabetic die
lery W. Belles, '39E, treasurer and ' it is merely necessa
Charles E. Moore, '39E, councilman. cess sugar. And a
Professor Atwood of the Electrical centage of the Am
Engineering department then ad- than eight per cent,
dressed the group, telling some of the amounts of sugar
highlights of his trip through Central lactobacillus outgr
Eurone last summer. caries.
- - - -- - -

om Page 1)
with an accuracy
variation in re-

'I

BuildingsAt Forum 2
Prof. Arthur B. Moehlman of the,
,School of Education will discuss the
background and results of a survey
into the building needs of Ann Arbor
public schools at a meeting of the
Ann Arbor Community Forum March
14 in Ann Arbor High School. His
talk will be illustrated by lantern
slides.
Prof. Erich.A. Walter of the Eng-
lish department and president of the
board of education will speak of the
present position of the board in re- ;
gard to these problems.
Meanwhile, the Ann Arbor board of
education authorized theapurchase of
a $25,000 school site located south of I
Stadium Blvd. and. east of Packard
St. Wednesday. There is no imme-
diate prospect of erecting a school
and it has not yet been determined
which will be built, a junior high
school or an elementary school.
SEE MOON SATURDAY
The moon will pe 1"open to the
public" from 8 to 10 p.m. Saturday,
at which time the public is invited to
look through til"tnlescopes in the

MARSHALL Cut-Rate
231 SOUTH STATE - Phone 9242 - 8 Doors No
TED'S DAILY DOUBLE PRICES EFFECTIVE
By Popular Request While The
Large 15c NESTLE Crunch Reg. 25c)
CHOCOLATE BARS 2-Drop Han
9c AE9c
FILMS AT CUT-RATE PRICES!

nt. In some pa- PHILLIPS T SPEAK
ry to resort to a Ralph S. Phillips vwill speak on
t, while in others "Linear Operators" at 4:13 p.m. today
iry to restrict ex- in Room 3201 Angell Hal at the
very small per- regular meeting of the Junior a.iathe-
erican people, less ( matical Club. Refreshments will be.
may enjoy liberal served following the talk.
with no fear of
owths or dental LAST DAY
"You're Only,
Young Once
Drug *
rth of Kresge's
TODAY
y Last!
Allen's STARTING SATURDAY!
nd Lotion
do with those
its between
op into the
have a cool
enjoying or
DMAN, I
Lnd Others EXTRA
CARTOON: "Paper Hangers"
Jnder Miller
Drug Store 'STROKE OF GENIUS"
- NEWS of the DAY

What do youc
leisure momen
classes?
Why not dr
SUBWAY and
beverage while
dancing to
BENNY GOOI
KAY KYSER, a

LAST TWO NIGHTS !
Kaufman & Ferbei's original Broadway comedy
"STAGE DOOR"
PLAY PRODUCTION at the Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Box Office Open 10 a.m. Prices: 75c - 50c - 35c

DANCING 2-5 and 8 - 11
John Abraham and
Don Kelsey, Managers.

...

AMWRG.GERS
"The Best Coffee in Town"
" 810 SOUTH STATE ST.
" 1215 S©. UNIVERSITY -
* 1104 SO. UNIVERSITY V -
316 W, Michigan - Ypsilanti

The Subway

U

Angell Hall Observatory.

Classified ireetory

i

MwA

20c to 5 P.M.
25c AFTER 5

,$ fl
l_

CONTINUOUS
1:30 - 11:30 p.m.

FOR SALE}
FANCY APPLES, popcorn, fresh sweetI
cider. No preservatives. Will deliver.
Phone 3926. 1003 Brooks. 417
WASHED SAND and Gravel. Drive-
way Gravel. Killins Gravel Co.
Phone 7112. 7x
LAUNDRY

i MW'mw

'r=

old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
ments. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
MEN and women are offered the
highest cash prices for their dis-
carded clothing. See Claude Brown,
512 S. Main. Phone 2-2736. 388

it

(1

"_

U

U. of M. ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
presents
WEN DIE LL CHAPMAN
and His Motion Picture
"WILD ANIMALS OF THE ROCKIES"
Tuesday, March 15, 8:15
HILL AUDITORIUM

3 DAYS!

STARTING TODAY!

CANTOR
0 ' lAOlyk
T QLu4 r NDI

I

STUDENT LAUNDRY. Shirts 12c.
Call for and deliver. Phone 4863 for
other prices. 360
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
NOTICES
LADIES tailoring and dress-making;
formals, suits, coat relining, all al-
terations. Expert service, reasonable
rates, work guaranteed. 320 E. Lib-
erty. Call evenings. 2-2020. 8x
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any

COMEDY:
"Gracie at
the Bat"

EXTRA-
GOING PLACES
with
Lowell Thomas

CARTOON:
"Little Red
Walking Hood"

=--ry 1

r''
" e,

Faculty Members .. .
and Fellow Students

I offer you a fine
service, and the
check your tubes

line of Radios at most attractive prices, expert radio
most perfect radio tubes man can produce. I'll
or radio free of charge.

NOTI(
tere,
Call
8989
Iinig.
t

We Deliver
Phone 9392

NEXT TO GOLDM ANS

CE: Fraternity or sorority if in-
sted in making house change.
Donald Duncanson. Telephone
. 306 Ann Arbor Trust Build-
436

I

Admission 50c and 75c

On Sale at Wahr's

50c MOLLE
Shave Cream
29c
$1.00 DRENE
SHAMPOO
79c

Six Genuine Takamine
Tooth Brushes
54c
$1.00 Pacquin's
Hand Cream
79c

I Oc
PERFUMES - COSMETICS Powder Puffs

Rubenstein's, Coty, Corday, LeLong,
DuBarry, Max Factor, Primrose House,
Geurlain, Ayer's.

3 for 25c
Sc IODENT
Tooth Paste
33c
16 oz. Rubbing
Alcohol

CIGARETTES
Camels, Luckies,
Chesterfields
$1.17 carton
Stationery
100 Sheets
50 Envelopes
45c
1000 Facial
Tissues
Double Strength
39c

p.;'

CAMPUS

CUT-
RATE

SENSATIONAL

DRUG

218
South State

5c SOAP SALE

5c

VOTE for
Bob Colten's Radio Shop
SLATER'S BALCONY

$1 KURLASH
Eye Lash Curler
69c
$1.50
pi

200 SQUIBB'S
ASPIRIN
69c

Overstock of America's leading maker
of Expensive Soaps. Values up to 25c.

14c

'THE PEN THAT MAKES WRITING A PLEASURE

______________ ,:

. I

likh,

NOW

tok mANMN

MATINEES 25c
NIGHTS 35c

SHTOWING

E
N

pe

59c

FRIDAY and
SATURDAY

ONLY

59

This Certificate i W orth $441

L
I
M
I
T
3

This certificate and 59c entitles the bearer to one of our Genuine Indestructible $5.00 VACUUM
'FILLER SACKLESS FOUNTAIN PENS. Visible Ink Supply. You SEE the Ink. A lifetime guar-
antee with each pen. Sizes for ladies, men, boys, and girls. This:pen will not leak, blot or break.

to
m

THE NEW PLUNGER FILLER - VACUUM ZIP - ONLY ONE PULL AND IT'S FULL
~UUUWU~U UUTartURi .. z few

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