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March 09, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-03-09

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PAGETWO

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAR!CH 9,1938

Chrysler Head
Sees Openings
DespiteSlump
Dr. Thomas Finds Greatest
Opportunities Now Lie
In Smaller Business
(Continued from Page 1)
swiftly because it is unimpeded by
the industrial hierarchy whose ex-
perience blocks entrance to the top
positions in the large corporations,"
he said.
In crisp phrases Dr. Thomas em-
phasized that business had no place
for men who believed opportunities
to succeed were delivered with a job
like the morning paper. "Business it-
self is facing the greatest internal
shake-up in its history in attempting
to create such opportunities and it is
precisely the men who can roll back
the frontiers, find new methods of
carrying on industry who are in de-
mand. Opportunity is there, it awaits
the man who can tame it and lead
it back with a ring in its nose. Men
with imaginative notsrefrigerated
minds are sought," he said.
The leading industrialists are not
exclusively hard headed business
men, Dr. Thomas said. The imagin-
ative or poetic element is an essen-
tial part of his capacities, for his is
a job of ceration. "Cars or sonnets,
each arises from the human mind,
each is a response to the creative
urge."~
The days when a smooth front and
5; tooth paste grin were the criterions
by which industrial corporations
picked men for jobs are over, Dr.
Thomas, pointed out. Especially in
engineering attempts to substitute
personality for brains are doomed to
failure. "You can bluff along many
lines but a differential equation is
strangely unresponsive to such an
approach," he said. For that rea-
son the men accepted for the Chrys-
ler Institute of Engineering are gen-
erally in the first third of their class,
both in engineering school and in
other fields.
Listing the intangibles for which
the largest corporations are search-
ing in new personnel, Dr. Thomas
emphasized the ability to bring a
fresh viewpoint upon the role of
business to the organization and the
ability to fit that approach into the
existing pattern.
"The whole problem of remaking
the world is not being dumped into
the college graduates lap, as he
emerges from school. His ideas will
go into a synthesis and the man who
can make this synthesis is unusually
valuable to his firm."
DRUIDS TO MEET
Druids will hold an important lun-
cheon meeting tomorrow. All mem-
bers must attend.

Hitler's Right-Hand Man Goering Leads The German Band

Herman Wilhelm Goering, Adolf Hitler's right-hand man and the only active field marshal since Hitler's
army purge, is shown here at left in Berlin as he used his marchal's baton for the first time as a goose-
stepping color guard of airforce men marched in review to celebrate the third anniversary of the official
rebirth of the German air force.

Health Service
Gives February
Illness Report
Appendicitis Continues As
Most Prevalent Serious
Diagnosis At Institute
The report of the Health Service for
February reveals a 'noticeable de-
cline in upper respiratory infections,
as compared with February a year
ago. Total service, according to the
report, was increased slightly, but
this was not attributed to any par-
ticular cause.
Student patients at the University
Hospital last month numbered 21, as
compared with 46 a year ago. Three
deaths have occurred, the report says,
since last July. There were five
deaths for a similar period ending
March 1, 1937.
Dr.e hVax L. Durfee, who issuedithe
report, declared that, "Appendicitis
continues to be one of the most pre-
valent of the more serious diagnoses
at the Health Service. For 20 years
there has been a rather constant rate
of about seven cases per thousand of
the student body per year."
Dr. Durfee warned against the use
of cathartics for the relief of "stom-
achache," and pointed to the e4 sy
availability of medical attention
which the student body enjoys
Harvard Museum Invites
Plummer To Give Address
James M. Plumer, lecturer on Far,
Eastern Art in the Institute of Finej
Arts, has been invited to deliver a
talk Thursday, March 10 by the offi-
cials of the Fogg Museum of Har-
yard University.
M r. Plumeris known for his ex-
cavations of the early kiln sites in the
Far East; he will talk on "Recent
Pottery Excavations in China."
SOPHOMORE GROUP TO MEET
A meeting of the sophomore class
committee on student government'
will be held at 2 p.m. today in the
Student Publications Building to dis-
cuss the Student Senate elections,
James MacDonald, '40, announced
yesterday.

Incri inates Buk arin

Barbara Yakovleva (above), once
head of the dreaded Soviet Secret
Pclie-, was taken from a Moscow
prison to testify against Nikolai
Bukharin in Stalin's trial of "trait-
ors." A large, faded woman of 53
now, she said she heard in 1918
that Bukharin wanted Nikolai
Lenin and Joseph Stalin assassin-
ated if they insisted on peace with
Germany.T

Automotive Physics
Meeting To Be Here
(Continued from Page 1)
Laboratory; J. S. Thomas, president
of the Chrysler School of Engineer-
ing; and Charles F. Kettering, di-
rector of General Motors Research
Laboratories.
Tuesday's program will open with
a talk on physics and rubber by W.
F. Busse, manager of the Goodrich
Physical Research Laboratory. Other
speakers will be: O. J. Horger, re-
search engineer in the Timkens Rol-
ler Bearing Company; Mr. Martin;
Lloyd Withrow and G. M. Rassweiler,
General Motors Research Laboratory;
Paul Huber, General Motors Proving
Grounds; and. Professor Firestone.
Sigma Rho Tau Defeats
Ypsilanti Debating Team
The neophytes of Sigma Rho Tau
secured revenge for a defeat last
week when they defeated the Ypsi-
lanti Girls' Debating Team in a re-
turn debating match at Ypsilanti
last night..
The Michigan t.am took the affir-
mative side of the Question "Should
the NLRB be empowered to enforce
all industrial disputes?".

Mattern Announces
Glee Club Schedule
The Glee Club's scheduled concerts
for the remainder of this semesterI
were announced yesterday by Prof.I
David Mattern, Conductor.
The first concert is listed for to-
night before the Progressive Educa-
tion Club in Northville, under the aus-
pices of the Extension Division.
The Club will appear at the dinner
given by the Interfraternity Council,
honoring Coach Fritz Crisler, March
23. The choristers will give their
annual concert this year March 24.
The next appearancesisscheduled for
April 25 before the Society of Auto-
motive Engineers convention in De-
troit.
'Stage Door' Opens
Tonight At League
(Continued from Page 1)
jory Barowsky, '39, and Mary Bell
'39.
Male roles will be played by Morlye
Baer, Grad.; Edward Jurist, '38; Rob-
ert Hayden, '38; Benjamin Wampler,
'39; Howard Johnson, '39; William
Rice, '38; Bernard Benoway, '39E;
Edward Newman, '38; Nathan Gitlin,
'39; Donald Ward, '39, and Myron
Wallace, '39.
Oren Parker, instructor in the
speech department, has been in
charge of the sets for the play.
The play will also be presented at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow, Friday and Sat-
urday. Tickets are available at the
box office of the theatre.

German SportsI
eSignificant,
Student Cla ims~
i8
Sport 'in Germany is significant,
not as a part of military training, but
as a part of education, Hans Berg,
Grad., told the Deutscher Verein last
night at the League.
Speaking in German on "Sport in
Deutschland," Berg, an exchange at-
dent from Munich, stressed the sig-
nificance of sport in German educa-
;ion and compared sports there with
those in America.
Sports are closely associated with
ethical ideals, he stated. Emphasis
ix placed on physical education not
a: opposed to intellect but as a coun-
ter-measure to intellect.
This association with ethical ideals,
he continued, does not indicate a de-
crease in the quality of physical edu-
cation which has continued to be as
good as in other countries. For proof
he cited Germany's success in the last
Olympic games.
Berg lauded the American system
of making football play such a major
part in the University. This, he be-
lieves, makes schools here much more
interesting.: Germany, he said, is only
beginning to follow this plan.
Berg declared that, contrary to
common belief, the Storm TrooprsI
are not a militaristic organization'
but a political and sport group to give
people, especially the poorer class
an opportunity for continuous excxr-
cise in sports.
Germany has no game similar to
our baseball according to Berg. Theirj
football is similar to American soccerI
and rugby to American football. Other
sports commonly participated in by
German students ahe handball, field
and ice hockey,

EVENING RADIO
, PROGRAMS
WJll
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports
6:15-Dancing Moods.
6 :30-Boake Carter.
6:45-Lum and Abner.
7:00-Poetic Melodies
7:15-Hobby Lobby
7 :45-Melody and Rhythm.
8:00-Cavalcade of America,
8:30-Eddie Cantor
9:00-Andre Kostelanetz.
9:30-Ben Bernie Orch.
10:00-Gang Busters
10:30-Diesel Flashes.
10:45--Musical.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-Reminiscing.
11 :45-Solay
12 :00-Johnny Hemp's Orch.
12:30-Dance Music.
WWJ
P.M..
6 :00-Tyson Sports
6:15-Sophisto-Kats.
6 :30-Bradcast
6:,45-Soloist.
7:00-Amost'n' Andy
7:15-Kottler Conducts
7:45-Sport review.
8 :00-One Man's Family
8:38--Tommy Dorsey's Orch.
9:00-Town Hall Tonight
10:00-Your Hollywood Parade.
11:00-Newscast
11:30--Horace Heidt's Orch.
12:00-Dance Music
CKLW
P.M.
6 :00-Turf Reporter
6:15-News and Sports
6:30-Exciting Moments.
6:45--Happy Joe "Quiz."
7:00--Fulton Lewis, Jr.
7:15-Wings Over the World.
7:30-United Press News
7:45-Mercy Hall,
8:00-U.S. Marine Band.
8:30-Happy Hal's Housewarming.
9:00-The Red Ledgor. "
3:30-Spotlight Parade,
10 :00-Symphtonic Strings.
10:30-Melodies from the Skies
11:00-Canadian Club ;eporter
11:15--Dance Music.
12:00--Guy Lombardo Orch.
WXYZ
* P.M.
6 :00-Day in Review
6:1 5-Black Flame.
6:30-Baseball Extra.
6 :45-Lowell Thonas
7 :00-Easy Aces

MA RSHALL Cut-Rate Drug
231 SOUTH STATE - Phone 9242 8 Doors North of Kresge's
-TED'S DAILY DOUBLE PRICES EFFECTIVE TODAY -=
GIANT NESTLE CRUNCH J lbs. PERFUMED
CHOCOLATE BAR WATER SOFTENER
15c Value Priced at C1 Ic33c
TAMPAX 33c KOTEX 20c - MODESS 19c
IF YOU'RE A STAGE DOOR JOHNNY -
You'll want to be there when Play Production's "STAGE
DOOR" swings open with the loudest bang of the theatrical
season, 8:30, tonight at the Mendelssohn.

A few seats left for tonight's
at a price (35c, 50c, and 75c).
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday

performance may still be had
But then there are more for
evenings, too.

For you who want to laugh loud and long at the latest
Kaufman and Ferber brain-child, the box office will stay open all
day today. Phone 6300 now.

I:

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If _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

LClassfied irectrny

.......

FOR SALE
THE BAKED GOODS Exchange holds'
a sale of home-baked foods every
Thursday at Harris Hall from 10-4.
Eclairs - individual pies - cookies
cakes - fried chicken, 420
FOR SALE: Large residential lot on
Vinewood Blvd. Exclusive and re-
stricted section. Cash. Phone 8544.
431
PANCY APPLES, popcorn, fresh sweet
cider. No preservatives. Will deliver.
Phone 3926. 1003 Brooks. 417
WASHED SAN?5 and Gravel. Drive-
way Gravel. Killins Gravel Co.
Phone 7112. 7x
LAUNDRY
STUDENT LAUNDRY. Shirts 12c.
Call for and deliver. Phone 4863 for
other prices. 360
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
NOTICES
MEN and women are offered the
A Musical more sumptuous than
you've ever seen! A Sonja more
exciting than she's ever been!

highest cash prices for their dis-
carded clothing. See Claude Brown,
512 S. Main. Phane 2-2736. 388
LADIES tailoring and dress-making;
formals, suits, coat relining, all al-
terations. Expert service, reasonable
rates, work guaranteed. 320 E. Lib-
erty. Call evenings. 2-2020. 8x
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3.
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
ments. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Pair of knitted gloves. Left in
taxi Friday night. Please call 3664.
434
2 - 4 - 7,- 9 P.M.
3 DAYS - STARTING TODAY

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S
SEE OUR NEW ARROW SHIRTS
WILDa e CoMANY
State Street on the Campus

I

if
F.n
Fi tti ngC

AC ON!
If you set a lire-cracker off beneath
a stubborn mule you milay well expect
results. No matter what your prob-
lem, a Daily Classified Ad can also be
depended uponi to bring results.
Whether you wish to rent a room or
sell a pai r of roller skates, you will
find T le MishigaiiDaily the perfect
Iled i tlni. Siti py telephone 23-24-1, or
drop in at the business office in the
Publications Building, on Maynard
Street.
Swhziantt

k

SONJA HENIE
DON AMECHE

and Proper

The "One in a Million" sweet-
hearts radiantly re-united!

ill

HAPPY
LANDING

F by 5ANN.
wihL Ws~re n f pfy~~b A t
r'~ dietv6A a ie

The collar attached dress shirt is the smartest and
most comfortable thing for black tie occasions.
Try Arrow's Shoreham, It has the non-wilt Aroset
turn clown collar, a soft pleated front, and'-the
Mv~itogzltailored fat. . . $

A

KkOW

with

TIMA'KT vTiTt cunr m

11 if I

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