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February 25, 1937 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1'1! U1CtiUA ', 1 'L

2

New Community)
un d Directors
Are Nominated

5,000 Members
For Nominees
March

To Vote
Early In

.. LIFE..
By J. A. B.
Since early in the afternoon the
four of them had been down at the
beer place playing fantan and a
couple rubbers of bridge, sipping beer
the while.
When the hand of the electric
clock pointed to almost four, they
talked it over and decided to see the
movie matinee before going home to
dinner.
Frank sort of wavered as they
crossed Liberty Street on the way to
the theatre, and they had to hold
him up.j
"I feel sorta silly-" he muttered.
"You shouldn't have had that last
beer-"

-,I

EVENING RADIO
PROGR AMS

Following its approval by the board
of directors of the Community Fund,
the nominating committee, headed by
Mrs. Allen S. Whitney yesterday
made known the list of nominees
from which five new members of the
board of directors are to be chosen.
The new members will replace the
five board members whose term of
three years expires this year, and will
be elected by the ballots of the 5,000
members of the Community Fund.
Everett R. Hames, director of the
Fund, said yesterday that the ballots
would be delivered starting March 1,
and that the membership cards will
be delivered at the same time.
To Have Cards
The membership cards, he ex-
plained are an innovation this year.
Many persons have asked for them
to show to representatives of various
organizations soliciting rfunds, and
they would like to be able to show
that they have made their contribu-
tion through the Community Fund
organization.
An effort was made, Mr. Hames
said, to have the nominees represent
various groups. The nominees fol-
low:
Emory J. Hyde, president of the
Alumni Association, retired; Sam D.
Bothman, 'retail merchant; Dana E.
Seeley, manufacturing; Mrs. Joseph
R.. Hayden, women's organizations;
Mrs. William C. Trow, women's or-
ganizations, Prof John P. Dawson,
University Law School; Frederick R.{
Hull, retail merchant; Prof. Ben-
jamin W. Wheeler, University history
department; Dr. C. Howard Ross,f
professional; Rev. T. R. Schmale,7
ministerial.
Several University Members
In the persons of Mrs. Hayden, Mr.
Hyde, and Mrs. Trow, as well as Pro-
fessor Dawson and Professor Wheeler
the University will have representa-
tives, raising the number of repre-
sentatives to five.
Mr. Hames also explained that
within a week of the announcement
yesterday, according to the Commu-
nityFund Constitution, any group of
fifteen members may propose an-
other nominee for the elections which
begin March first. The ballotting, he
said, will end on Feb. 28, after which
no further ballots will be counted.

All through the show Frank felt
pleasantly sleepy. He didn't get in-
terested in the picture, and when he
caught a glimpse of the screen be-
tween naps, the scenes swam before
his eyes in a shimmery haze. He
lost track of the story, gave it up as
ia bad job, and just sat there feeling
comfortable and warm. He slumped'
down in his seat and nodded gently.
He was was disturbed out of an
' cstatic half-slumber when some peo-.
ple brushed past him. He fumbled
for his coat and economics book, and
followed them into the dark aisle.
He came out on the icy street with
one arm about somebody's shoulders.
It was only when the cold wind struck
his face that he realized he didn't
know the ' fellow. He withdrew his
arm with an empty, apologetic smile.
He didn't know any of the people. His
brothers were still in the theatre.
His coat buttoned about him, the
economics book fast under one arm,
he made his way toward the frater-
nity house. Let's see-an explana-
tion-what a razzing he'd get at din-
ner-only three beers!-any explan-
ation-.

CKLW--1030 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-"Magic Island."
6:15-News and Sports.
6:30-Dave Schooler's Orch.
:00--_ Lomax-Sports Commentator.
7:15-Sweet Music.
7:30--Trans-Radio News Bulletins.
I7:35-Melody Interlude.
745-Pleasant Valley Frolics.
800-Banberger Symphony Orch.
8:30--Guy Lombardo's Orch.
9:00-Ici Paris.
1 30-Melody Treasure Hunt.
10:00-By the Sea.
10:30-Musical Review.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:'15-Berry Winton's Orch.
I 11:30-Kay Kyser's Orch.
A.M.
12:00--Benny Goodman's Orch.
12:30-George Hamilton's Orch.
j1:30-Weather Forecast.
WJR-750 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson News.
6 :15-Envoys of Melody.
6:45-Renfrew of the Mounted.
7:00-Poetic Melodies.
7:15-Diamond City News.
7:30-Alexander Woolcott.
7 :45-Boake Carter.
8:00-A&P Band Wagon With
Kate Smith.
9:00-Major Bowe's Amateur Hour.
10:00-Your Adventures with Floyd Gib-
bons. o ie
10:30-M arch of Time.
1:0-News.
11:15-Mummers-In the Little Theatre
Of the Air.
11:45-Wismer Sports.
11:50-Red Nichol's Orch.
A.M.
12:00-Marvin Frederic's Orch.
12:30-Vincent Lopez's Orch.
WWJ--920 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-Ty Tyson.
6:10-Dinner Music.
6 :30-Bradcast.
6:40-Odd Facts.
6:45-Police Commissioner Pickert.
7:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
7:15-Dramatic Moments.
7:20-Evening Melodies.
7:30-Detroit News Radio Extra.
8:00-Rudy Vallee.
9:00-Showboat.
10:00-Kraft Music Hall.
11:00-Tonight's Hockey.
11:05-Northwood Inn Orch.
11:30-Dance Music.
A.M.
12:00-Webster HallAOrch.
12:30-Weather.
WXYZ-1240 Kilocycles
P.M.
9:00--WPA Detroit Civic Orch.
9:30-America's Town Meeting.
10 :00-Morrie Brennas's Orch.

Taterman Marionettes To
Present 'Peer Gynt' Herea
Saturday
By ELSIE ROXBOROUGI
Can you imagine a certain breath-
taking moment backstage, with an
,enormous cast awaiting the final cur-
tain call, and yet none of the highly
painted, elegantly costumed ladies

I
t
rjli
7

lMute Players Present Umnie
Situaution In Modern IThetr

most marionette shows, solves the of Music, will direct the University
(dW etj flftctively and economically. SymphonyOrchestra for the Ann Ar-
hti prodo c on i, therefore, accomb- bor presentation.
I:lieli ct o I:tit~tge that "cellls to be l To Pe Third Shfwiig
It of sixty feet, wide and thirty feet I ' it I ti.ri .. . " i n t $

episodes. It is the play that best re-
veals the charac'eristicaily somber
Ibsen as a man also capable of gayety,
wit and satire.,
Except for the Radio City Music
Hall in New York, there is hardly a
theatre in America suitable for pre-I
senting the elaborate sets necessaryl
in "human" scale. However, the nov-I
elty of cuting the actors down toi
puppet size and depending upon the
curious optical illusion common to

high, while it is actually, only about
a third of this size.
Play Makes Good Drama
Ibsen himself, was surprised that i
this fantastic play of his should have
made such good drama.
His discovery was followed by* a
personal request to his contemporary,
Edvard Grieg, to write the music for
the show. The resulting fusion of
music, drama poetry and color makes
fascinating theatre.
Dr. Earl V. Moore of the School

and gentlemen saying a word of
either encouragement or discourage-
ment to one another?
This will be precisely the case Sat-
urday, at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre when Ibsen's greatest poetic
achievement, "Peer Gynt," will be
revived again through a distinctly
new medium, that of the Tatterman
marionettes. It means the answer
to the prayer of the medical pro-
ducer, Gordon Craig, who dreamed of
a theatre without impertinent and
bigoted men and women, a theatre
which should possess all of the good
points and none of the bad of any
flesh and blood production.
Remains Most Difficult
As an Ibsenian drama "Peer Gynt"
has remained the most difficult to
present because of the intricate tech-
nical difficulties involved in staging
the play. Only twice before has it
been attempted at all successfully
and these times came when Richard
Mansfield and later the Theatre
Guild, starring Joseph Shildkraut fell
upon it.
"Peer Gynt" is a wild, strange play,
chuck full of weird characters and

Another Week-oEnd of Specials
at the
MILLER DRUG STORE
727 North University
T H URSDAY - FR IDAY - SAT U RDAY

appeared here twice before, once to
do "Stringing Broadway," a satire
on the Broadway shows and again to
do "The Fire Bird," when the sym-
phony orchestra was first a part of
their production. These glamorous
actors and actresses, operated by
strings, are built at the Cleveland
workshop. They are made audible
through the intonations of profes-
sional actors. They represent a real
utopia to the usually frenzied direc-
tor.

ISLE, OF MAN
KN ITWEAR
at
LONDON SHOP PRICES
with 201 Discount Balance of February
MILLIE CLIFFORD 1236 Washtenaw

r

I.-.

Flarders
or
lowers
PHONE 9690
106 East Washington Street
Member of
FLORIST TELEGRAPH
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__________________________________________n

I ~~~Ip~ ________

FRAGR AAT

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