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April 29, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T H E MIC HIGAN D AIIL Y

TilURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1937

'Ensian Pages
Swelled With
24New Groups
Some Organizations Never
Took Space In Yearbook,
Others Reappear
Twenty-four organizations that did
not have pages in last year's 'Ensian
will appear in this year's book, ac-
cording to Frank Coolidge, '38, organ-
izations manager of the yearbook's
business staff.
Some of the 24 have never before
taken space in the Michiganensian;
others have returned to the year-
book's pages after several years ab-
sence, he said.
The Universityof Michigan Archi-
tectural Society, the Michigan Union
waiters in the upstairs dining room
and the Union Taproom btis boys are
among the organizations.
The senior pharmacy class, only
senior class not in last year, com-
pletes the list of senior officers from
the University's 11 colleges and
schools.
Among the other organizations and
groups are the Hygienists and under-
class officers in the dental school, the
University of Michigan Branch of
Aeronautical Sciences, in its first year
Sn campus, Sigma Rho Tau, engi-
neering honorary speech society for
men, and Zeta Phi Eta, national pro-
fessional women's speech arts society.
Phi Delta Kappa ,honorary educa-
tional fraternity; Omega Upsilon,
completing its first year here as a na-
tional radio, speech and dramatic so-
ciety for women; Assembly Ball Com-
mittee; and Interfraternity Ball Com-
mittee are among the 24.
Sharing a page are the Arabs Stu-
dent Union and Delta Epsilon Pi, fra-
ternity for natives of Greece. The
Forestry Club, junior class officers of
the education school and two engi-
neering societies, American Society of
SCivil Engineers and American Insti-
tute of Chemical Engineers, continue
the list.
Also taking space are the honorary
musical fraternity, Alpha Epsilon
Mu; Adephi, men's forensic organi-
zation; Theta Sigma Phi, national
honorary and professional journal-
ism society for women; and Sigma
Alpha Iota, national honorary profes-
sional music sorority.
The professional legal fraternity,
Delta Theta Phi, and Alpha Alpha
Gamma, honorary women's sorority
in the architecture school, complete
the list of the organizations, Coolidge
stated.]
FRATERNITIES TO MEET
LANSING, April 28.-(P')-MoreI
than 30 representatives of Michigan
college fraternities will meet at Mich-
igan State College tomorrow for the
opening of a three-day conference.
Tours & Cruises
ENGLAND. FRNCE. GERMANY, Etc.
Makc Touu a end Setam Re e ervaM NOWYPhon 641 2
Steae
$pecialist-r
Sinc. 1917 ^
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KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU'
60) . HURON ST. ANN ARBOR. MiCH. I

'Fl ying Ring' Featured At campus Show Summer Term

Lives In 'Iron Lung'

Offers Study
Of Languages

INTERNATIONAL DINNER HELD HOSTEL GROUP TO MEET
An international dinner, sponsored All persons interested in securing
by the Student Christian Association passes or information regarding the
for foreign and American students American Youth Hostels and the
was held at 6 p.m. yesterday at the summer hostel excursions are invited
Union. The dinner was for the pur- Ito attend a meeting at 7:30 p.m. to-
pose of widening acquaintanceships day in Lane Hall. The meeting will
between foreign and American stu- be in the form of a round table dis-
dents and to promote understandings cussion and is sponsored by the Ann
among them, according to Frank Mc- Arbor Committee of Michigan Hos-
Donald, '39, in charge tels.

Linguistic Institute
Toward Scientific
Of Languages

Aims
Study

Ernest Ross, research engineer, is pictured reaching for a ring hurled
into the air by the action of opposing magnetic forces generated by
high frequency current in. an induction coil, a feature of Previews of
Progress demonstration.

SDAILY OFFICIALg
L BULLETIN II
(Continued from Page 1)
day, April 29, at 6:30 p.m. in the
Michigan Union. There will be elec-
tion of officers and Dean C. S. Yoa-
kum will speak on "The Program of
the Graduate School."
All members of the faculty wheth-
er members of the Association or not,I
are cordially invited. A special in-
vitation is extended to members of
other chapters who may be on the
campus.
Omega Upsilon radio dramatic pro-
fessional sorority will hold tryouts at
Morris Hall today at 7:30 p.m. All
those interested are requested to
bring own readings, or be ready to
interpret a selected reading over the;
microphone.
Sophomore Engineers: Final pay-
ment of this year's dues will be ac-
cepted today on the second floor of
the West Engineering building near
the Arch. It is necessary that we
collect a sufficient sum to cover ex-
isting debts of the class.
These consist of our Engineering
Council assessment; cost of 'Ensian
page, 1937 edition; Rentschler Stu-
dio, 'Ensian photos; and the Honor
Council assessment of both last and

this year. Your cooperation is ur-
gently desired.
Chairman Finance Committee,
Fred M. Emens.
Swimming, Women Students: All
those who signed up for swimming at
9 a.m. on Tuesday and Thursday
mornings and any others interested
are asked to report at the Union Pool
at 9 a.m. this morning, without fail.
Coming Events
English Journal Club meets Friday,
April 30, at 4 p.m. in the Union. The
program, open to the public at 4:20
p.m., will be a colloquium on the
study of American Literature. Mr.
Charles Walcutt will discuss "Recent
Scholarship on American Fiction."
Mr. Charles Peake will talk on the
subject, "American Literature in the
English Curriculum." General dis-
cussion will follow.
J. L. Davis.
French Plays: Tomorrow at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, at 8:30
p.m., the Cercle Francais presents
three one-act plays in French. Box-
office open today.
Phi Lambda Upsilon: Informal
spring initiation Friday evening,
April 30, at 7 p.m. in Room 303,
Chemistry Building. Banquet on
Saturday, May 1, at 6:15 p.m., Mich-
igan Union. All members are re-
quested to purchase tickets immed-
iately.

For the second annual season the
Linguistics Institute, held under the
auspices of the Linguistics Society of
America, will be offered this summer'
as a regular part of the University
Summer Session, it was announced
yesterday by Prof. Charles C. Fries of
the English department, director.
The Institute, to consist of class-
work, lectures and luncheon confer-
ences, is offered for the study of lan-
guage and linguistics from a historical
and structural point-of-view, Profes-
sor Fries stated. Its aims are to-
ward the development of a scientific
knowledge of linguistics in their fun-
tion among tribes and peoples. It will
also study the laws of language
change and growth. Histories of va-
rious languages and studies of lan-
guage structures and fundamental
principles will, be given.
Help In Research
These courses will have their main
appeal to men doing research in lan-
guages, to professors of languages
who are seeking a historical back-
ground to their work, and to grad-
uate students in languages, it was
said. Undergraduate students who
are concentrating in the fields of-'
fered and who have had prerequisite
training may enter the courses.
The program of the Institute will
consist mainly of regular class and'
laboratory work. This will be sup-
plemented by a series of lectures by
the staff and guests brought to Ann,
Arbor for the purpose. On Tuesdays'
and Thursdays during the summer, a
series of luncheon conferences will be,
held, at which linguistics topics will
be discussed. Though primarily for
members of the Institute, these con-
ferences will be open to the public.
Composed Of Language Scholars
The Institute is being sponsored by
the Linguistics Society of America'
and eight departments of the Univer-
sity which will offer courses. The
Linguistics Society is an organiza-
tion of language scholars over the
country to promote the study of lin-
guistics in all of its aspects. It co-
operates with the University in spon-
soring the Institute, Professor Fries;
stated, and in running its administra-'
tion, choosing the five-man adminis-
trative committee from among its
members. Originally started at Yale
in 1928, the Institute was held at New
York University in 1930 and brought
here last year.
Parle Evokes
Lively Opinion
OVlp
O~n~italTopics

Betty Sue Martin, five-year-old
North Carolina girl, can still smile
after 35 days in an "iron lung" at
Johns Hopkins Hospital in Balti-
more. She was placed in the lung
when her respiratory system was
paralyzed after diptheria.
Labor Relations Act
Is To Be Introduced
(Continued from Page 11
ernor has been so active in settling
was described as a "natural reasser-
tion of personality" after the loss of
confidence and morale by the general
public during the depression by Mr.
Murphy last night.
The striving for security is one 1
manner in which the working pop-
ulation is reasserting itself after the
long period of economic hardship, the
governor said. "We are entering a
new era of security," Governor Mur-
phy said, "and one way in which the
struggle is taking form is unioniza-
tion and collective bargaining."
Collective bargaining is the only
method that an individual worker can
turn to, Governor Murphy said. "It is
the way in which he can combat ar-
bitrary and unfair practices It
would be futile for a man working for
a concern employing 100,000 men to
protest or even seek an audience. Col-
lective bargaining provides his only
answer," he said.
When unionization and the sit-
down strikes hit Michigan, the Gov-
ernor went on, it was a wholly un-
precedented problem. "There was no
pattern by. which we could go by. I
resolved that the only policy to fol-
low was one of perfect impartiality
and neutrality, thus giving both sides
confidence that they would receive
fair treatment."
Mr. Murphy warned against a fas-
tidious, legalistic approach to the
problem of sit-down strikes, declar-
ing that he thought it wisest to leave
the legal aspects of the question tem-
porarily so that they could be ironed
out later in a more judicious atmo-
sphere.
"Although there must be an obed-
that there was an need for violence
at the time of the strike and it was
fence to civil authority, I did not feel
better to settle the matter with un-
derstand rather than force," he said.
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THE CHRISTIAN SCiENCE MONITOR
An International Daily Newspaper

May Breakfast: Members and at-
tenders of the Ann Arbor Friends
group are cordially invited to the
annualaMay Breakfast of the De-
torit Independent Friends' Meeting,
Sunday, May 2, at the Y.W.C.A.,
Montcalm and Witherell Sts., Detroit.
Cafeteria breakfast at 9:30 a.m. An
address by Robert W. Kelso of the
Institute of Public and Social Ad-
ministration of the University on:
"The Function of the Layman in
Modern Social Service" will be fol-
lowed by a meeting for worship at
11:15 a.m. We are anxious to have
as many attend from Ann Arbor as
possible. Please make reservations by
Thursday with Esther Dunham
(7830), indicating (1) whether you
would like transportation, or (2)
whether you can furnish transporta-
tion to some of the group.
JOHNSON TO HEAD CHURCHES
The Rev. Arden S. Johnson, minis-
ter of the Federated Church of Dex-
ter, was elected president of the
Washtenaw Council of Churches and
Christian Education at a dinner held
Monday night in the Bethlehem
Church.

Publead by
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCJ PUBLISIiING SOCIETY
One, Norway Street, Boston, Massachusetts

(Continued from Page 1)
Work on the Parley has been carried
on all winter by the executive com-
mittee, of which Ralph Danhof of the
sociology department is chairman.
Throughout the winter months this
committee, Dr. Blakeman said, has
discussed student life and inquired
into major movements in other uni-
versities. It has contemplated educa-
tional ideals and tried to relate edu-
cation to society in general, he said.
Goals are formulated in the light of
this discussion, Dr. Blakeman said. "A
Program of Our Times," succeeds a
series of Parleys of which the major
themes have dealt with social change
and living philosophies of thought
and action. The first Parley was held
in 1931.
More than 200 campus organiza-
tions have been asked to participate
in the Parley, he said.: These include
the Union, the League, The Daily,
honor societies, debating groups, pro-
fessional societies, the Interfraternity
Council and Panhellenic Association.
As the last step, 17 faculty per-'
.sons will be chosen from. a list of
nominations submitted by these or-
ganizations for a faculty panel to
lead discussions.
If you're expecting cellophane-
wrapped, fool-proof and sure-to-cure
answers to vital questions, the Par-
- ley's not the place for you, Dr. Blake-
man said. What you will get, he
stressed, is a fast-moving presenta-
tion of varied ideas and clashing
opinions that will make you more
keenly aware of the world about you,

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