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April 25, 1937 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"T" TH E M ICHIGAN DAI LY

SUNPA, ,APR ae5, 193Y

Dr. Earl V. Moore,
Philadelphia Arranger, Cailliet,
Says, 'Patien ce Own Reward

lWusical Director,_Says Array Of Artists Is Best Yet
_ _ir r FFs t at
litetrpolitn Bsso I FstvalDircto Blieves Festi val Wagein Tnor FestivalN te

Lucien Cailliet, arranger for the;
Philadelphia Orchestra is a living
testimonial to the saying that "Pa-
tience brings its own reward."
For 17 years, he was a member of,
the wood-winds section of the orches-
tra, where he played all varieties of
clarinets (especially the bass clar-
inet) and even the saxophone when
necessary. Then two years ago, his
talents as an orchestrator were dis-
covered when he did an arrangement
for a Bach choral prelude, "Herzlich
tut mich verlagen," played by Eugene
Ormandy on one of his guest visits
with the Philadelphia.
2aillet lisplays Varsajility
Since then more than a dozen Cail-
liet orchestrations have been played
by the Philadelphia, and several new
ones are included in their repertoire
for the tour. His arrangements are
done in his spare time, far he is still
displaying his versatility as a player
of the wood-winds.
Cailliet usually takes the old 17th
and 18th century clavier pieces or
organ works, and expands them into
renewed life in the gorgeous color
-.1 _. __ ._ _.

and many-voiced harmonies of the
modern orchestra.
"Some people think that is a kind
of musical sacrilege," he says, "but
there were no great symphony or-
chestras in those times, else the mas-
ters would undoubtedly have written
for them. I think of my orchestra-
tions as acts of homage."
P1arents Were Musical
Cailliet, who is a Frenchman, a
native of Chalons-sur-Marne, ac-
counts for his profession as or-
chestrator by explaining that from
the time he was a child he had a
passion for making big pieces out of
little pieces-and since his parents
were musical, he turned this liking.
toward making big pieces of musip
out of little ones.
Cailliet says his orchestrations
take from one to three weeks, de-
pending, of course, on their length
and complexity. Many of them are
done in the summer, when he takes
his family to alittle cottage by the
sea, and works on his assignments for
the orchestra's use during the com-
ing season. The orchestration bus-
iness isn't a very profitable one for
a free-lance without connections, he

EN7JO PINZA
says-at any rate, not in the sym-
phonic line. Jazz and musical com-
edy arranging is another matter, he
believes; some very sizable incomes
are made in that.
ITURM1I TURNS CQNpU COR
Jose Iturbi first attracted world
attention as an orchestra leader when'
he played 25 recitals in six weeks in
Mexico City. He is appearing in Ann
Arbor as conductor for the first time.

DR. EARL V. MOORE
WINS SOLO ChANCE
No plans had been made for public
appearance when Eugene List, 18-
year-old pianist, acting on his own
initiative, entered the yearly competi-
tion for an appearance as soloist with
the Philadelphia Orchestra, winning
the contest unanimously. He, there-
fore, appeared as soloist

Here Is Largestv
Of Universities'
IDelars Forti ie 'mf I
Stars Were AvaiaIeill h ot
(2oneimmSerie)
dent symphony, the programs vary in
scope more than at the other major
festivals.
The programs of the Festival are
also built with the ability and special
talents of the artists appearing, al-
ways considered, Dr. Moore added.
"We attempt to balance the programs
to fit both the artists and the de-
sires of the patrons," he said.
Programs Are Varied
Thus, he explained, the programs;
as a whole include a wide scope of
musical compositions and will pre-
sent a cross-section of truly great
music. Two evenings, Wednesday
and Thursday, Dr. Moore explained,
are in the main devoted to Wagner,
exemplifying German Music; Italian
music is included in the Friday andj
Saturday night concerts; Bach com-
positions, which proved so successful
last year under Leopold Stokowski's
conductorship will again be given
Wedncday night; Russian and
French are also represented by other
composers.
"This is ihe first time that we have
ever had a great Wagnerian tenor
such as Lauritz Melehior," Dr. Moore
continued, and it will thus be possible
to present scenes from 'Pa rsifal,'
which requires a voice such as Mel-
chior's."
The psychology of the Festival au-
diences was described as particularly
interesting by Dr. Moore, who likened

-

LAURITZ MELCHIOR
the Ann Arbor Festival to the in-
ternationally great festivals of Vien-
Ina, Bayreuth, Munich and Salzbu~rg.
The patrons come from great dis-
tances, he pointed out, "to immerse
themselves in the musical atmo-
sphere to get away from the hum-
drum existonce in large cities and
offices, to enjoy good music, well per-
formed. During the week, the people
live in the Festival atmosphere," he
said, "with the artistic debauches
proving as effective as other forms of
loosening the moral fibre." The
gorging of good music is unfortu-
nately unavoidable, he explained, for
financial reasons. The audiences
have thus far cooperated extremely
well with the performers, he said, de-
veloping the feeling that the concerts
must be absorbed to be enjoyed.
Success Exceeds Hope
The Festivals here have proved ex-
tremely successful, Dr. Moore con-
clhded, although, he remarked, when

As CompiledBy
Li cuten wanger
(Coltiriuced from Paw.' )
showing. in Paris in 1863, of a sun-
set by Monet entitled "Impression."
In these days of tabloid symxphon-
ies and vest-pocket overtures, on.
centemplates with awe the tone-ab-
sorbent powers of audiences of .a cen-
tury ago. The complete program for
the occasion on which Beethoven's
second Symphony was played for the
first time (Vienna, April 5, 18O3)
consisted of the .aster's First and
and Second Symphonies, the C minor
Piano Concerto, the entire oratorio
"The Mount of Olives," and "other
works." At the last minute somebody
weakened and the "other works"
Dr. Stanley first began the series, he
believed that the concerts would not
continue for long, but in relatively
few years was surprised even himself.
Thus, the Festival series was con-
servatively initiated in 1894 with
one day devoted to it; the second in-
cluded four concerts in two days; the
third included five concerts in three
days; and, finally, in 19Q7, the 4-day,
six-concert Festival was first in-
itiated and continues to the preenrt
day.
Only three orchestras have pa'tzci-
pated in the May Festivals: the first
being the Boston Festival Orchestra
with Emil Mollenhauer as conductor;
the second, the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra under Frederick Stogk,;
and the last being the Philadelphia
which first came here for the Festival
last year under Stokowski.

.. ,_ ,
h'
. . ..

4

Program fo r

The 1937

May

Festivala.

. .

8:30 P.M.

WEDNESDAY

8:30 P.M.

FRIDAY

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD, Soprano
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue in F minor... . ..........Bach
.Chorale Prelude, "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" . Bach
"La Mer" ..... . ... .... . . . ... ...... Debussy
Aria, "Leise, Leise" from "Der Freischutz"....Weber
MISS FLAGSTAD
"Pictures at an Exposition"....Moussorgsky-Caillet
Brunnhilde's Immolation and Closing Scene
from "Gotterdaxnmerung'.............. Wagner
MISS FLAGSTAD
8:30 P.M. ThURSDAY
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHEOESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL. UNION
LAURITZ MELCHIOR, Tenor
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
MR. ORMANDY and PRQF. EARL V. MOORE,
Conductors
Overture, Leonore, No. 3 ................Beethoven
Arias: Prize Song from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner
First Forging Song Rfrom "Siegfried"......Wagner
MR. M'JELCHIOR
"The Seasons" ............................ Fogg
T HE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Scenes from "Parsifal" . ................. Wagner
(a) Procession of the Knights to the Castle
of the Holy Grail, from Act I.
(b) Parsifal's Temptation, from Act. II.
(c) Closing Scene, from Act III.
MR. MELCHIOR and
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
ELISAEETH RETHBERG, Soprano
EZIO PINZA, Bass
MR. ORMANDY, Conductor
Academic Festival Overture .... . ...........Brahms
Scene: Ah! Perfido ...................Beethoven
MISS RETHBERG
Eight Russian Folk Dances .. ............. Liadow
Arias: Non piu andrai
Se vuol ballare from "Marriage of Figaro". .Mozart
MR. PINZA
Duets: Bei Mannern, welche Liebe fuhlen
from "Magic Flute" ...:............... Mozart
Crudel! perche finora from "Marriage
of Figaro" ............................Mozart
MISS RETHBERG and MR. PINZA
Symphony No. 4, in E minor...............Brahms
2:30 P.M. SAT URDAY
TE P~IILADELPH3IA ORCHESTRA
JOSEPH KNITZER, Violinist
JOSE ITURBI, Conductor
Symphony No. 2 in D major ............ Beethoven
Concerto in A major for Violin and Orchestra.Mozart
MR. KNITZER
"Tzigane" for Violin and Orchestra..........Ravel
MR. KNITZER
Gaucha con Botas Nuevas ................Gailardi
Intermezzo from "Goyescas" . ........ ..Granadus
Dances fromn "Three-Cornered Hat"....... de Falla

TIC FT
Sale of Indfvidual. Tickets or May
Festival Concerts will begin at 8:30
a.r. Monday.
Individual Tickets $1, $1.50, $2, $2.50
A iited su'pply of Season Ticketk is
still available. Place your order now.
Season ickets ... $6, $7,
If Festival Coupon is returned, prices
arc reduced to $3, $4 $5.
Sch ool of Muic Off£ % ic, Myard S.
BUY0
MTdhilT9

4

8:30 P.M.

SATURDAY

2:30 P.M. FRIDAY
TH-E IPHILAIDELPHIA ORCHESTRA
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
EUGENE LIST, Pianist
MR. ORMANDY and JUVA .HIGBEE, Conductors
Overture to "Der Freischutz"...... . .......Weber
Songs: "The Lass with the Delicate Air".....Arne
"The Trout" ..........................Schubert
"Lullaby"..............................Scott
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESrIVAL CHORUS
"Unfinished Symphony" .......... . . ....Schubert
Allegro moderato Andante con moto
Cantata, "Spring Rapture" ...............Gaul.
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
Concerto No. 1 in E flat for Piano
and Orchestra ........................... Liszt
MR. LIST

TIILEPHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
MISS RETHBERG, Soprano
MARION TELVA, Contralto
ARTHUR CARRON, Tenor
CARLO MORELLI, Baritone
MR. PINZA, Bass
MR. CHRISTIAN, Organist
PROFESSOR MOORE, Conductor
"Aida" (in concert form) ................... Verdi
An Opera in Four Acts
CAST
AIDA .........................MISS RETHBERG
AMNERIS ............... ......... MISS TELVA
RADA)VES.MR. CARRON
AMONASRO ............MR. MORELLI
RAMPHIS, THE ING . . . . . .....MR. PINZA
Priestesses, Soldiers, Ministers and Captains,
The People, Slave Prisoners..............
...........THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

II N ,11.

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