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April 23, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T1LI MICHIGAN DIAILY
., la: _ 1 A . . t l V " : . , ~

E ngineers PlaLI
To Open Doors
For Week.End
Divisions Plan Exhibits;
Cyclotron To Be Shown
Publicly For First Time
Outsiders will be given an oppor-I
tunity to see. the engineering college 1
in action for the first time since 135
when it presents its "Open House"
on April 30 and May 1.
All divisions of the college includ-
ing the aeronautical, civil, mechan-
ical, geodesy and ,surveying, drawing,
marine and naval architecture,
chemical and metallurgical and
transportation engineering depart-
ments and 'the military department
will sponsor exhibits.
Engineering open houses have been
conducted at intervals of three or
four years since 1913 when the first
was offered. The program will offi-
cially begin at noon next Friday and
continue until noon of the next day.
A system of guides has been or-
ganized to conduct visitors over the
buildings with special guides sta-
tioned at the most important ex-
hibits.
Two newly developed features will
be on public exhibition forthe first
time. The cyclotron will be put on
display for the open house by the
physics department. The other will
-be on the Paris Gun.
An open air debate between Sigma
Rho Tau, national honorary engi-
neering speech society, and Alpha Nu,
literary college speech organization
is planned by the open house com-a
inittee.t
m*."er features which will be shownt
in operation are the naval tank, thes
wind tunnel, the metallurgical fur-
naces, the foundry on the fourthd
floor of the West Engineering Build-
ing and a one million volt research
apparatus.

Would-Be Sit-Downers Rush Factory

- Associated Press Photo
Several thousand pickets rushed an entrance of the Artcraft Silk
Hosiery mill in Philadelphia and succeeded in placing more than a score
of men in the closed plant to start a sit-down strike. Picture shows
strikers struggling through the door.
Intelligence Does Not Determine
Size Of Vocabulary, Tests Show

THE JOHN MARSHALL

SC HOOL
FOUNDED 1899
AN
ACCREDITEiD
LAW SCNOOL
TEXT and CASE
METHOD
For Catalog, recoi-
mended list of pre-legal
subjects, and booklet,
"Studyof Lawand Proper
Preparation" address:
Edward T. Lee, Dean.

COURSES
(40weeks peryear)
Afternoon-3y"rs
5 days... 4:30-6:30
Evening - 4 years
Mon., Wed., Fri.,
6:30-9:20
Post-graduate
Tyear..twicea week
Practice courses
exclusively.
All courses lead
to degrees.
Two years' college
Lwork required for
entrance..
thewclasses form
in Feb. and Sept.

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Recent vocabulary tests given to
about 500 students of speech 31 show
that there is no apparent relation be-
tween native intelligence and the
size of the vocabulary Prof. Gail E.
Densmore of the 'speech department
declared yesterday.
Since thinking is inseparable fromj
words these results might at first
seem questionable but apparently
people with small vocabularies can
sometimes use these verbal tools
more efficently Professor Densmore
continued.
Individual students show a great
variation in score, probably due to
iome stimulus and environment he
aid.
Verbal intelligence or vocabulary
proficiency seems to be much more
function of wide r.eading than in-
elligence .and the encouragement
and desire for reading is very often;
fred into people at home, Professor
Densmore explained..
There are no great variations no-
iceable between students: from small
owns and large cities, declared Pro-'
essor Densmore, nor are there any
arge differences between men and
women students.
The tests which are given to all
tudents enrolled in speech 31 are
meant to stimulate an interest in

315 Plymouth Ct., Chicago, Ill.

60c Friday and Saturday
MIC HIGAN SEA L
E STATIONE RY
50 SHEETS
50 ENVELOPES
55c
POND'S
MOT H ER'S DAY
500 Sheets
Cleansing
Tissuesb
I 9c L ENTIHIRIC
LOTUS D'OR
MIRACLE
SHANGHAI
50c
TWEED
CARDENIA DE TA INTI
LE PIRATE
ASPHODELE
100
ASPIRIN We make our own
TABS Ice Cream.
MI L LE R

words and in building a vocabulary,
Professor Densmore said. No notice-
able short term effects have been ob-
served, individual scores on each t'est
are about the same, he continued.
They consist of 150 words apiece
and three are given. The highest
mark recorded this year was . 147
right.
Mosherettes' Cry:
Buy HIM Flowers'
Michigan's men may act their
stubbornest, today and tomorrow,
but they'll never resist the wiles of
the beautiful Mosher women who,
according to Berta Knudson, '38A,
will be tripping all over the place
buttonholing them with carnations
and gardenias.
The scheme, dug deep down from
the dark dungeons at Mosher, would
deprive the men of 15 cents for each
of Nature's finest flowers.
"Why," Miss Knudson said, "our
2,500 allotment will be gone in no
time, and we don't know where we'll
be. able to get reinforcements. The
only way the fellows can get out of
buying them," as far as I can see, is
-to refrain from wearing buttonholes."
TAILOED AT FASION PARK
* R OM T lE
HJiglh Wind Swept Andes
Aiountains o f South
Amertca and,
v .
,'*,
The Sun uBuked Plains
Of Asi Ili r
, t
CneThe Yarns ''hat
Go Into The Muking cf
PA RC 0RA
he yarns of the South
A mncricaGl. 0 taiiaco and
the Asian Angora are
1lenlded by F'ashion
Park in a manner
known only to them
.producing a Fabric
tih<at is unrivalled in
luxury, warm th with-
out weig'ht, lustrous
richness and log scr-,
v'icc... .Only Pargora has
all these qualities and
they are mighty rare
values at
S2Q50

Deranged Man
Jailed Pending
Hospital Entry
Former Ann Arbor Man
Is Arrested In Detroit On
'Disorderly'_Charge
Edgar T. Van Buren, 36 years old,
Ann Arbor, yesterday was being held
in County Jail by order of Judge Jay
G. Pray until he can be admitted to
the Ypsilanti State Hospital for the
Insane.
.Van Buren was an employe of the
King Seeley Co. until six weeks ago
when he was discharged because he
'was "unable to cooperate with other
workers." After his dismissal there,
he tried to organize the 1,200 em-
ployes of the company into the Unit-
ed Auto Workers of America, but was
unsuccessful.
About 10 days ago, according to
Van Buren, he decided to become a
preacher in the Church of God, and
went to Detroit and started to visit
hospitals there to make speeches.
According to Sheriff Jacob Andres,
the Receiving Hospital in Detroit
finally had him arrested as being
disorderly, and local sheriff's depu-
ties went after him.
He declared yesterday that he
wanted to get out of jail because he
had to go to the Eloise and local
'hospitals "to speak to crippled chil-
dren and those who were sick."
AliFach O Drgan
Proram To Be
Given__Sunday
A recital made up entirely of Bach
compositions will be given by Prof.
Palmer Christian, University Organ-
ist, April 25 in Hill Auditorium. The
general public, with the exception
of small children, is invited without
admission charge.-
The program prepared by Profes-
sor Christian includes: Toccata and
Fugue in D Minor.
Three Chorale Preludes
a. Wachet auf ruft' uns Stimme
b. Dies sind die heiligen zehn Geb
ot (fughetta)-.
c. Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ
Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C.
Two Transcriptions of Cantata
Orchestral Interludes.
a. March ("Drama per Musica").
b. Sonatina ("Gottes Zeit ist die
allerbeste Zeit"). Passacaglia and
Fugue in C minor.
Riegel Says Trade
Unions Are Needed
(Continued from Page 1)
ferent cities will be able to get in-
formation from one source.
Professor Riegel scouted the idea
that such agencies might be used as
excuses for black lists, declaring that
such lists were superfluous since effi-
cient personnel management in
checking up on the past work of ap-
plicants would be sure to discover'
any such facts about a laborer from
fornier employes.
And lastly, he concluded, it can be!
the clearing house for information on
wage levels in the industry, on un-
employment and on various other
topics vital to the manufacturer.
"Throughout, it must be remembered
that while associations exist for the

benefit of the employer. they are not
necessarily opposed to the public good
or to labor's good. Only in cer-
tain cases has this been true and
those cases should be curbed," he
said.

C
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That first year of college may be L -Y LU L , .enaie
made considerably less difficult for
the high school graduate by means Y;
of a plan of pre-college conference 67 Democratic Votes Pave
groups, according to Ralph H. Gar- Way For Adoption Of
ner of Columbus, O., secretary of the
"O o anolumseear ofth Corporation Measure
Ohio and Michigan Y.M.C.A., who Z ~ dIl 'aSi'
stopped in Ann Arbor yesterday.
The plan would provide for having LANSING, April 22. - 1P) -- The
college students confer with the sen- Democratic House majority over-
iors in high school throughout Mich- whelmed Republican opposition to-
igan with the view of dispelling some. dytosvehruhheMr-K
of the false ideas of college life that day to shove through the Myers-Kap-
prevail, Mr. Garner said. The col- pler rural electrification bill.
lege students selected would typify Not a Democratic "nay' 'appeared
a better and deeper side of college, he on the voting machine as the measure
continued, and would try, by de- advanced on a 67 to 24 vote. It goes
scribing from their personal exberi- to the Senate for concurrence, facing
ences, to give a clear and accurate a hard fight.
picture of college devoid of the usual Rep. Charles R. Feenstra, Repub-
stress on the rah-rah spirit. lican, Grand Rapids, managed to get
- - - into the record part of a speech as-
Tlesailing the bill as "a huge electrical
r e~ll racket at the expense of the farmers,"
despite heckling and parliamentary
maneuvers by the Democrats.
Rep. Fred Kappler, Democrat,
Houghton, led the fight for the bill
Is Post ned which went through in the form he
wanted-providing that any three
rural residents might incorporate a
(continued from-Page -- - co-operative to distribute electrical
energy, free of public utilities com-
ordinance, but were unable to find it. mission jurisdiction. Under the terms
Neither the city attorney nor Judge of the bill such a co-operative woulJd
Payne was able to find the ordi- have the right to condemn and pur-
nance," Evanoff said. chase competing private utilities if it
"By that time, about 12:30, it was could prove the public service would
too late to select a jury to try the benefit."
case today. Therefore it was agreed An attempt by Rep. John S. Smith,
by the attorneys and Judge Payne Republican,' Alma, to attach an
that the cases be set for trial Wed- amendment creating a state board to
nesday, April 28. Inasmuch as the control electrical cooperatives in the
complaints and the warrants charge same manner the state public utilities
each of the defendants with the vio- commission controls private concerns
lation of an ordinance, it was agreed was beaten back.
that prior to April 28 Mr. Laird, the Feenstra, interrupted repeatedly
city attorney, would supply Mr. Leh- with motions that his speech be
man with another bill of particulars "considered read," charged that the
specifying the particular conduct bill would permit co-operatives' di-
which brought the respective defen- rectors to perpetuate themselves in
dants under arrest," Evanoff said. office, fix their own salaries, and run
He left yesterday afternoon for the associations without governmen-
Flint, where he is an attorney for tal supervision. He bandoned the
the United Automobile Workers. speech when Rep. Herman H. Dig-
Naefus, according to Lehman, will nan, Republican, Owosso, suggested
be the first defendant to go on tial. that he "show the good sense to stop
Prof. Maynard Kreuger of the Uzi- the oratory."
versity of Chicago, here as a speaker The House voted also 'to extend
at the Peace Demonstration, told The free college tuition to the children
Daily yesterday that "the Chief of of World War veterans who died as
Police is acting as if war had already a result of service. It goes to the
been declared." Senate for approval.
"These students are obviously not
charged with what they are guilty of. IOBBER GETS $26
They are guilty of orgaizig to im- The Kappa Sigma fraternity, 806
explaining their grievances to others. Hill St., was robbed of $26 in cash
Let them be trie a on these charges sometime Wednesday night

Garner Proposes
Pre-College Talks
To Aid Freshmen

Lr;4 4111 h41fVi l 1mi th ~~ rha
instead of phoney ones," he said.
"The chief needs a sedative," he
continued. "He has a bad case of
jitters. Perhaps this is due to the
unsettled psychological effect of the
organization of the sheriff's Gilbert"
and Sullivan army of vigilantes."
j _ - - ---,
ST EN O TYPY
Machine Shorthand
--- New Class Monday
Hamilton Business College
William at State
,U..

1 _. _

Hat for

11 ural Electric
Bill Is Passed

For that

DI NNE R
DATE
t ake your fiance
to the new
Gril
615 East William St.
Second Floor

I

s'
' s
i
.'

# . ,
CLUBQ

s y,,

G

Even thu your inferiority
complex may be at its low-
est ebb, we can guarantee
you an immediate "lift" in
a new Varsity-Town Gab-
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appealing in the smartly casual Varsity-Town sport and
lounge models. You've never seen the equal of Varsity-
Town's rare color blendings... a "Sur~f Club (gab" will

I I I _ __ _, I

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