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April 04, 1937 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-04

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9TEN

THE MICHIGAN DIAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 1937

Puerto Rico's
Natural Beauty
AttractsMany
Variety Of Views Makes
Island Ideal Vacation
Resort, Says Mercado
One of the outstanding attractions
of Puerto Rico as a vacation resort
is the wealth of natural beauty the
island presents, according to Emerlin-
do Mercado of the Romance Lan-
guages department, himself a native
of the island.
It is not only the flaming spectre
of the- mountains, nor the dazzling
splendor of the beaches, but the tre-
mendous variety of beauty that
makes up the island's landscape, he
said.
"At some points' along the highway,
for example, the road meanders over
precipitous cliffs which descend
thousands of feet to the checker-
board filelds of coffee, tobacco, pine-
apple and sugar cane. On the north
the dark hues of the Atlantic are
visible while to the south the soft
blues of the Carribean stretch away
to the horizon."
Even Temperature
Puerto Rico has a more even tem-
perature throughout the entire year
than any section of the United States,
Mr. Mercado declared, the average
temperature being somewhere in the
neighborhood of 76 degrees, while the
highest temperature ever recorded by
the U.S. weather burcau at San Juan
was 94 degrees.
"If a person plans to spend the
whole summer in Puerto Rico he
would do well to take along his own
automobile as the use of a car is a
great facility on the island," Mr. Mer-
cado said. "Gasoline in Puerto Rico
is only a few cents more than in the
United States and round trip trans-
portation for automobiles from New
York 'amounts to $101.
"The most popular automobile trip
for the visitor is the "loop trip" and
requires from five to six hours (the
island is only one-thirteenth the size
of Ohio), Mr. Mercado said. "On
the loop trip one passes some of the
most beautiful scenery, and the most
interesting historical spots anywhere
on the island. The numerous orange,
pineapple and coconut groves as well
as the cultivation of the famous Puer-
to Rican coffee are all parts of the
journey."
Go During Winter
Mr. Mercado said that the winter
season, especially the months of De-
cember and -January, is by far the
most preferable time to visit the
island, for then the holiday spirit is at
its height. However, he said that
many tourists choose the summer
months especially for short .vacations.
"Unless one has many contacts and
friends on the island," he said, "a
visit of the whole summer is liable to
grow monontonous."
Of all the islands of the West In-
dies group, Mr. Mercado continued,
Puerto Rico is most nearly Ameri-
can. There are, however, vestiges of
the old Spanish civilization still very
apparent, he said, which effect a
rather "half-breed' type of civiliza-
tion.
Many Sports
"For example, one can spend a
pleasant evening in a beer garden,
sheltered by the majestic royal palms
and hear the strange native Puer-
to Rican music one minute and im-
mediately after the latest American
jazz 'hit,'" he 'explained.
For the sportsman there are many
and diverse attractions. Tennis, golf,
deep sea fishing, horse racing, base-
ball, mountain climbing and picnic-
ing are all offered in abundance. One

of the most popular sports on thel
Island is cock fighting, which has
been legalized, he added.
"The cocks are pampered and
cared for almost like humans and
the meeting of two famed fighters
Why not
F df we L
this Summer?
VILHJALMUR
STEFANSSON
The noted eaplorer has planned an exait-
Ing trip that you cain join at the end of
your college term. Memrbers of this 8T-day
NORTH LAND
E X P E DITON
will tour Denmark, Norway, Sweden and
Finland; they will go to Iceland for 12
days and then into the interior of Lapland
where they will live for 2 weeks in the
Prapsof native Lapps. The expeditton vllI
also go into the new Russia, EstoniaAnd
Latvia. The culture of northern peoples
willa studied at their most interesting
sources, combining educational values
pit~h real adventure- Membership limited.
Write for special booklet (1)1.
SEMINAR ON
ECNOMIC LIFE
IN EUROPE
Prof. Broadus Mitchell
of Tohms Hopkins ILn)ee_ =iy s ill conduct
d°~-dnv study te'ur of p.liticn economic
conditions in EnglIAd, Denmark, Sweden,
Finland, Soviet Union. Austria. Switze-
lend and France. The progaram includes

T housands Are Awaiting

The 'All-Aboard' Whistle For Foteign Lands

Ancient Ruins Seen
In Syria, Palestine
Archeological discoveries of much
interest to the traveler have recent-
ly made Palestine, Syria and Lebanon
meccas for many tourists.
Historically important events, such
as the uncovering of ancient Lachish.
which was mentioned in the Old
Testament, combine with beautiful
natural settings to provide a spleh-
did vacation journey.

1
I
I
Ea

.

Warmer Climates Offer Excuse
For Purchasing New Garments

South Bound Vacationers
Can Buy Their Cottons
In Ann Arbor Shops
By HELEN HENDERSON
Shining sun and sparkling water
a stretch of sand and a warm
breeze . . .dancing on a terrace-a3
touch of summer in April is in store
for those who will head south during
Spring Vacation.1
With the thought of travel, a wom-
an's mind immediately turns to the
clothes problem, and nothing so de-
lights her as the necessity to buy
many new garments all at once. A
southern trip is an excellent excuse
to purchase an entirely different
type of clothes than will be worn in
our latitude for some weeks to come.
Already it is possible to buy cot-
ton frocks and play suits in Ann Ar-
bor. The clothes you will take South
with you this month can form the
backbone of your summer wardrobe
later on.
Wantong Favored
To whatever interesting spot you
are planning to go during vacation-
Florida or California or Bermuda-it
is a fact that much of the time your
clothes are going to be packed away
in a bag or trunk. Manufacturers
have kept this in mind in designing
resort wear, and a new material.
similar to shantung and called "wan-
tong," is predominant in summer
wear. It is said to be uncrushable.
Many tailored frocks that would be
excellent, for casual wear in the
South are made up in prints of this
material. One has a background of
3opper with white figures. It has
short sleeves and closes in front with
white buttons. Others come with
brown, white or blue background
Prints and close with the omnipresent
zipper.
Another spectator sports dress,
is the pccasion of a big turnout and
much betting," he said. "The police
usually preside at such affairs to
avoid the riots which are otherwise
liable to break out."
There are a number of modern mo-
tion picture houses on the Island
where American-produced pictures
are exhibited, Mr. Mercado said, and
in the newer theatres there is special
provision for talking pictures and
air cooling.
. 5

slightly less informal, is made of
navy uncrushable "wantong." Its
sole trimming consists of a white
zipper which goes all the way down
the front.
Now for active sports clothes. The
question seems to be between slacks
and shorts again, with shorts a trifle
more popular. The culotte is being
shown again, particularly for bicy-
cling. Slacks are, as usual, just
slacks, but shorts are flowering out
in prints more than ever before; and
the gayer they are, the better.
Cover For Shortsj
A ney style features an over-dress,
which slips over the head and is to
be worn over the shorts themselves.
It is made either in a matching or
contrasting color, or in the same
print, as the shorts.
The three-piece play suit is seen
again, with many of the skirts having
zippers. The skirts flare. Silk rayon
(Continued On Page 11)

Many Tourists
View Alaskan
Scenery Yearly
Nowhere, in the opinion of Prof.
Dow V. Baxter of the forestry school,
will one find a sheltered ocean course
that can match in length and forest-
ed mountain scenery that of the In-
side Passage along and between the
islands of British Columbia and
Alaska.
Professor Baxter has conducted
four expeditions to the Yukon and
Alaska and is familiar not only with
the usual points of interest in the
territory but also those off the beaten
trail.
"One may go only to Skagaway, a
seaway of more than 1,000 miles in
distance. If one desire a little open
water, he can continue from Skaga-
way to Seward," Professor Baxter
said. The many glaciers and par-
ticularly the Columbia ice face formQ
a cliff of rare beauty, he explained
"The entire coastal trip is in com-

fortable steamers and the climate is each year a new all-year figure tops
mild. The tourist should not expect) that of the preceding year. The
it all to be sunshine however, for it majority of the visitors sail on boats
is likely to be raining for much of the through July and AugustsThe traffic
voyage,"' he declared, is also large in September but these
"The spotlight has been on Alaska travelers are largely Alaskans going
for the last few years, and perhaps 'cutside' for the winter and people
never since the period of the gold connected directly or indirectly with
stampede days, has there been so the canneries." A tape-breaking
much publicity given the territory," tourist trade is predicted by Profes-
Professor Baxter said. "The story of sor Baxter for this year.
the Matanuska colonization project is "On the two National Forests of#
one that has appeared widely in the Southeastern Alaska, according to a
nation's press. A visit to the colony former regional forester, it is con-
can be included on a tour to Seward servatively estimated that there are
or to Mt. McKinley National Park 70,000 head of big game, including
without difficulty. sheep, mountain goat, black and
"Tourist interest is growing so that (Continued on Page 12)

The ruins of old Frankish castles
made by Latin Knights impress
tourists with their massiveness, while
the great Krak of the Knights, the
ruins of which rise mere than 200
feet and cover almost five acres, pro-
vides an interesting side trip for vis-
itors to the Levant.
Less exciting but still interesting
sights which offer tourists novel
travel experiences include old Da-
mascus, Beirut, and Antiochia.
G A TEWA.Y
CONDUCTED and
INDEPENDENT TOURS
Represented by
Frederick S. RatidaI
TRAVEL SERVICE
12 Nickels Arcade Ph. 6040

t
1
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r
s

2IL~l[L~ , II i I.l":I

Ilane

or 6J3oat,

Coast

or Ontinent

BmsUREAU OF
.UNIVERSITY TRAVEL
Exceptional Conducted Tours
NOW RPPRESENTED IN ANN ARBOR BY
FREDERICK S. RANDALL
12 NICKELS ARCADE PHONE 6040
Traveling This Summer?

The Canadian Pacific offers very attractive trips and tours for
Summer vacation travellers. Check your favorite and return
this advertisement:
Q 1. EUROPE, 34 days, 5 countries .... ..$279.25
Q 2. EUROPE, 37 days, 6 countries . $. . . 370.00
. 3. EUROPE, 49 days, 7 countries . $...472.00
Q 4. ORIENT, 45 days, 6 ports complete . $458.50
Li 5. ROUND THE WORLD, passage home
town to hone town $... .578.05
Q 6. SOUTH SEAS, Honolulu, Suva, Australia;
New Zealand, passage ... . $312.00
Q 7. ALASKA, from Vancouver, 9 days .... $95.00
Q 8. 9-DAY CRUISES, Montreal to N.Y. ..4$70.00
Q 9. CALIFORNIA-Banff-Lake Louise .... $159.00
If you want just the ocean trip without shore expense in Europe,
the Orient, or Around the World, we have some very attractive
fares.

You will find Smart 'Women wearing
I A TS
COATS
j
SUITS in two- and three-pi
styles of Poiret twills, herrin
bones, sharkskins, and w
crepes.
- COATS - 1937's brief bo
topper 's casual swaggers in so
soft fleeces, luxurious, lig
camels hair, and aristocra
mixtures.

IRayimond
Wliitcoinb, Inc.
CONDUCTED and
INDEPENDENT TOURS
Represented by
Frederick S. Randall
TRAVEL SERVICE
12 Nickels Arcade Ph. 6040

M.
1231

See Your Local Agent, or
E. MALONE, GENERAL AGENT
Washington Boulevard (Book Bldg.),
Detroit, Mich.

CANADIAN -PACIFIC

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OUR OFFICE IS
Your Travel Headquarters
FOR
AlR.. BUS..RAIL..STEAMSHIP
TOURS .. CRUISES
COMPLETE INFORMATION - RESERVATIONS - TICKE'TS
(No Service Charge)
Offiucdiul Agcnt for ALL Steamship, Rail,c nd Air Linies, Hvtel, and
AMEICAN EXPRES COMPANY R AYMOND WITCOMI3 COMP'ANY
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IARTL FrT.T AI IATwAY VARSITY -ei w r Tour enejii

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