100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1936 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Foreign Guest
To Be Honored
ByA. A. U. W
'China In Criss' Selected
TIpic For Address
The Ann Arbor branch of the
American Association of University
Women will officially open her
year's program at 6:30 p.m., Oct. 11,
with a supper meeting in the League
ballroom, at which the featured
speaker will be Dr. Yi-Fang Wu,
ylresident of Ginling College, Nan-
king, China. Dr. Wu has chosen as
her topic "China In Crisis."
While in Ann Arbor, Dr. Wu also
plans to speak at 8 p.m., Oct. 9, at the
First Baptist Church, at a meeting of
foreign missionary interests of Ann
Arbor. On Saturday, Oct. 10, Dr.
Wu will address the "Double Ten"
dinner of Chinese students, which
marks the celebration of the anni-
versary of the Chinese Republic.
Through her close identification
with members of the University
studying or working in China, Dr.
Wu has made many friends here,
various groups of whom are planning
to honor and entertain her during her
stay in Ann Arbor.
Attends Council Meeting
Dr. Wu, who received her Ph.D. in
zoology here, has recently attended a
committee meeting of the National'
Christian Council of China- which
met in London, and over which body
she presides as chairman. The coun-
cil meeting, for which Dr. Wu was
granted a leave of absence from her
office of president of the Chinese
women's college at Nanking, was for
the purpose of planning a World Con-
ference in China in 1938.
Dr. W/u was a member of the
Chinese group at the conference of
the Institute of Pacific Relations, and
represented Chinese women at the
International Congress of Women at
Chicago, both in the year 1933. The
same year Dr. Wu conducted a series
of foreign' mission conferences in
etern and mid-western cities in this
Was Barbour Scholar
While attending the University as
a Barbour scholar, Dr. Wu dis-
tinguished herself through a bril-
liant record of scholastic achieve-
ment. Honors conferred upon her,
as well as world-wide recognition
mark Dr. Wu as one of the Univer-
sity's most distinguished alumnae.
After receiving her degree here in
1928, Dr. Wu returned to China and
shortly assumed her duties as presi-
dent of Ginling college.
The A.A.U.W.'s international rela-
tions supper on Sunday is open to
she' public, and reservations may be
made at the League throughout the
week.
Church Guild Officers
To Be Installed Today
Officers and chairmen of commit-
tees of the Westminstgr Guild of the
First Presbyterian Church will be
installed at the morning church serv-
ice today.
They are: Phillip Gaston, '37, pres-
Bob Hduse, '38, treasurer.
Warrington Willis, '38, campus co-
operation; Bob Somers, '38, social
chairman; Guy Orcutt, '39, mem-
bership; Mary Pfleuger, '39, supper;
William Barndt, '37, project; and
Logan Cheek, '37, publicity.
TENNIS TOURNEY ANNOUNCED
All women interested in entering
the singles tournament which will be

the only tennis tournament this sea-
son are urged to sign up immediate-
ly on the paper designated for that
purpose on the bulletin board in the
W.A.A. building, according to H-ope
Hartwig, '38,
FOUNTAIN
PENS
Naflonally-Advertised Makes

10 Speak 11" ediwsday

Lutest Formal Gowns Fealwce
Hidden Hoops For Full .Sis
Square Neck, Tricky Belt, of some bright coo rdie si
High Color Are Newest eiwecm co tur:w.
For EveningWear of vet around a tmf h

a ca The marriage of Sheila Guntrup, church founded by Mr. Cram's
Wil O3pen aeasofl '35, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- grandfather. His mother is a Re-
________ am F. Guntrup of Detroit to Stuart gent of the University. Mr. Cram
The fall archer'y season will be of- Cram, '36, of Flint took place Aug. was affiliated with Phi Delta Theta
fiaay oened tomorrow with a tea 29 twsanucdrcnl. fraternity.
frcn 4 to 6 p.m. given by the archery IThe wedding took place in Mack-
uh i in the iounge of the W.A.A.
Thi khg fr al omon interested in
Plans for the activities of the club -
duing the season will be discussed)e r nu t
and tournaments both within the
erc9b and with outside organizations
har abar E stein, '39, woman's ar-
he~manager, and Mis Dorothy
clb are n c hregs and furtherh iny
formation can be obtained by con-/
tacting them,/ /

By HELEN HENDERSON
Hoops, my dear! You will find
them concealed under some of the
latest formals, all sewed up in net.
You will find zipper fastenings on
nearly all the dresses. Square necks,
tricky belts and light waists with dark
skirts feature the array of formals
which are available in the Ann Arbor
shops and ready to dazzle the fresh-
man who is in a quandary about

Theshoulder straps arc vswa rtro
of velvet, one c0t whm'h me ; be
slippe-d down cver th: shioulier at
right angles to the other.
Taffeta Appcars Again
There is fullness in all lhe skir' s.
A white taffeta, dress is trimmed with
bright blue bands and bril 11ants.
Changeable taffeta is seen again, us-
ually quilted. One changeable taf-
feta has little pockets in the skirt.

MARYANNA CHOCKLEY
* * *
Seaker To Aid
ChoosingWorki
The second in the series of fresh-
man orientation lectures is to be
given at 5 p.m. Wednesday in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre by Mary-
anna Chockley, '37, chairman of Ju-
diciary Council.
Miss Chockley has chosen as her
subject, "How to Budget Time and
Money," which will be designed to
help the first year women in planning
their college careers, and which will
incorporate various practical fea-
tures.
The second speaker of the after-
noon has not as yet been announced,
according to Jean Hatfield, '37, chair-
man of the League orientation com-
mittee. Dr. Howard McClusky, pro-
fessor of educational psychology, has
postponed his lecture on "Comprom-
ising Intellectual and Social Activi-
tics" until Oct. 21. Dr. McClusky's
talk was originally scheduled for
Wednesday.
MissrsHatfield is rto introduce the
advisors. She emphasized the fact
that although the lecture series is
compulsory, every effort has been
made to select speakers and topics
which will be of great interest to the
first year group.
Prof. Bennett Weaver, of the Eng-
lish department, is to talk on "In-
tellectual, Cultural Opportunities."

wflat to wear to tormal dilnners Or A black taffeta, trimmed only with
dances. abright flower, has its own floor
Some clever details we observed length matching coat, with huge
on this year's party dresses included puffed sleeves. No wrap is needed
little heart-shaped mirror buttons, Jwith it.
brilliant studs placed all the way Wraps are shown in velvet again,
down the front of a dress and silver trimmed lavishly with lapin. One
kid tassels hanging from a belt. regal cape has a huge collar of white
* For Afternoon Or Evening ilapin which extends down over the

Hockey Club To Meet
Under Liirene Prouse
With'9:30 a.m. set as the time and
the lounge of the W.A.A. Building as
the place, the Ann Arbor hockey club
will meet today to discuss organiza-
tion for the year, according to Miss
Lurene Prouse, president of the club.
Membership is limited to women
graduate students and members of
the faculty. All interested are urged
to attend as the club has a strenuous
season ahead.
The club will be hostesses to the
Australian team touring the United
States Oct. 16 and will be hostesses

/

//
/
I
A

Ii
/

1'

"Scotch and Soda" is the title of
a clever new number which is an
answer to the prayers of the girl who
can never decide whether to wear a
long or a short dress to the League
and Union. A black skirt is topped
with a metallic cloth or satin blouse
which has a low back. The skirt
length is ten inches; and with its
black jacket the dress is appropriate
for afternoon wear.
The formal rushing dinners will see
[ormals with jackets or dinner
dresses. One dinner dress has a rust-
colored crepe skirt and a chiffon
waist with long sleeves in a color .
called "Sundown." Another, similar
in style, is made up in conservative
black and white, and is called "It's
Love Again."
The black velvet dress trimmed
with lace will be worn to dinner, and
one could find no more suitable com-
bination for this season. A black
taffeta formal has a bolero jacket
edged with velvet, as is the skirt of
the dress.
Tailored Styles Popular
A dinner dress which particularly
printta heavy material mdeupi
o. tailored tunc styl.kAnothe tail
with gold thread in a design of little
squares. This one has a gold leather
belt, and buttons, made of the ma-
terial, all the way down the front.
Imagination has run rampant this
year in the strictly formals. The
brighter the colors, the smarter the
dress. Although black still holds its
place, it is often trimmed with bands

shoulders.
COLOR FEATURED
From the plain back suits so pop-
ular at the beginning of the fall sea-
son, fashion has swung to sudden
flashes of color, according to a late
fashion report. Thetri-color com- I

-.-------i

umbo ar vge in smart or as anauis for the Great Lakes Hockey tourna-
mor th voue n mar caualsuis.ment to be held here Nov. 20-21.

FRESHMAN HYGIENE TALK
The first freshman women's hy-
giene lecture will be given at 4:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium. Attendance is
compulsory. Dr. Margaret Bell
will be the speaker. General an-
nouncements will be given and a
short talk on hygiene. Supple-
mentary books to the lecture can
be obtained in any of the dormi-
tory libraries or in the Public
Health library in the Medical
building.

CMon. thru Thurs. - Shampoo
riand Finger Wave . . . . S0c "
Friayand Saturday . . . . 75c V
CNationally-Known Perma- C
nlents . ... ...$3, $4, $5, $6
n- Open Evenings - V
SR AGG EDY AN N
U ~ BEAUTY SHOPV
C Phone 7561 1114 5. University C

-~
:1 ~ ec 25S
* ~'v. ~ef of
L/ brta t ai
The Dwnton Shop for leguey ome
U T ZE L'

at FOOTBALL GAMES.. TEA DANCES

I I

all that's New
in
~FALL HAT FASHIONS
Priced from $3.00 up
at
DANA RICHARDSON
Our New Location 309 South State Street at the Dillon Shop

U

Wahl-Eversharp,
Parker, Waterman
and Others
Priced
$100
and up
A large and complete
assortment.
SERVICE WORK
a Specialty
Student and
Office Supplies
Correspondence

I

U

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan