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October 03, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCT 3, 1936

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Stepping

Stones

To

ANew

Fooball Renaissance

IVEUMANNV

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Wolverines Battle Spartans In TraditionalGrid Opener

Today

State To Try
For Third Win
Over Michigan
Sophomores On Spot As
Wolverines Get First
Test Of Season
50,000 Are Expected
Patanelli Shifted To Right
End With Loiko Taking
OppositeFlank
(Continued from Page 1)
as the outstanding freshman on the
squad.
In the backfield, besides Levine,
Kipke will start Cooper and Smithers
at the halves and Sweet at full back.
Both Smithers and Sweet are show-
ing more form than they did a year
ago with Sweet especially registering
great improvement. He and Cooper
will handle the punting for Michigan
with Cooper probably throwing most
of the passes.
Linemen Headed For Trouble
With Neumann, Agett, Sebo and
Brandstatter handling State's back-
field duties Michigan's linemen are
without a doubt in for a trouble-
some afternoon. "Agony Al" Agett
is the triple threat back of the Bach-
man team, doing the punting and
passing as well as being a hard
runner. His parallel in the Wolver-
ine backfield is the untried Cooper
who has starred in practice and gives
prdmise of being just as good under
fire.
.Brandstatter will give the inside
of Michigan's line a pounding if State
follows the same plan they did a year
ago. This powerful fullback, with his
own linemen and backs ripping op-
posing lines apart, has built up a
reputation as a great ground gainer
and it will be up to Marzonie and
Brennan to stop his assault.
For the past two seasons Michigan
has suffered considerably in grid
wars, winning only five games in the
last 16 starts. Although eight hard
games are facing them in the present
campaign, hopes for a winning eleven
are high, due mainly to the presence
of what is supposedly great sopho-
more strength.
Depends On Sophomores p
These men making their first start
for Michigan today will definitely be
on the spot as a result, and a victory
will probably do more good for their
morale than anything Kipke and his
coaching staff might do in a month
of practice. On the other hand, a win
for State may have as disastrous an
effect as a Michigan win would have
good, for if the team's morale dropst
to a point where they have no confi-
dence, opponents may find the Wol-t
verines offering little opposition this
year.
The Wolverines tapered off for
their State rivals yesterday by goingt
through a light drill consisting main-
ly of polishing off the rough spots in
the running and passing attack. The
team left for Plymouth last night
where they will remain until game
time.
Cubs Again Bow
To Chisox, 11 To 3
CHICAGO, Oct. 2.-(P)-Chicago's
White Sox mixed solid base hits witht
walks' and Cub misplays today to
coast to an easy 11 to 3 victory, their
second straight in the city champion-f
ship series, before 13,990 spectators at
Comiskey Park.
The Cubs started their right hand-
ed ace, Lonnie Warneke, figuring toT

square up for yesterday's 5 to 1t
White Sox truimph at Wrigley Field,
but the American Leaguers belted
him for three runs in the first inning,
and drove him from the mound dur-
ing a rollicking eight run drive in
the sixth. Roy Henshaw, Clay Bry-
ant, and Charlie Root shared the rest
of the Cub pitching.

'The PRESS ANGLE
By GEORGE J. ANDROS

All Tied Up

Experience vs. Spirit
"Will experience pay dividends?"
That is the question Coach Charlie
Bachmanof Michigan State has been
quoted as asking hinself this week,
and it can very well be one that is in
Coach Harry Kipke's mind this
morning.
Coach Bachman can, and probably
will, start a team that includes nine
men who have had two years of var-
sity experience.
Michigan, on the other hand, will
have six players in the starting line-
up who never have played collegiate
football.
"Will experience pay dividends," or
will the victor come out of the spirit,
willingness and love of the game
Michigan's sophomores have shown
in ousting veteran lettermen for their
positions?
I pick the Michigan Varsity.
To The Varsity
To the men who will represent
Michigan this afternoon:
Up at Lansing when a high school
football player airs the possibility of
his attending the University, he is
met on every side by:
"What! And have your team beat-
en by State every year?"
What are you going to do about it?
* * *
About 'Agony Al'
If "Agony Al" Agett (he hates the
nickname) proves a real star for
State this afternoon, it is going to be
the height of something or other.
Agett very much wanted toeiter the
University' Medical School this fall,
but finally was persuaded to stay at
East Lansing another year and be
the shining light in Coach Bachman's
football sky.
Incidentally a large number of for-
mer State students, at present fresh-
men in the several University grad-
uate schools, are having considerable
trouble in deciding for whom to cheer
this afternoon. I have my own ideas
on the subject, but would not express
them here.
A Contribution
"Rumor has it that Michigan
Trueblood Golf
Trophy Play
Begins Today
Play got under way yesterday af-
ternoon in the first of what is to be
an annual tournament in quest of
the trophy donated by Prof. Thomas
Trueblood, Coach-Emeritus of the
Varsity golf team.
The tournament will be conducted
on a 72-hole basis, and is open to any;
undergraduate student meeting the
scholastic eligibility requirements.
'M' men in golf will be barred from
competition in this tournament.
The 72 holes of play will be spread
out over four days,-today, tomor-
row, and next Saturday and Sunday.
It is recommended that persons wish-
ing to take part in the tourney should
report at the University course club
house soon after eight a.m. on the
days of play in order that 18 holes
may be finished before noon on
these, the rush days of the week.
The aim of the competition is to
help in the development of players
for the freshman and the Varsity
squads, and is another of the num-
erous manifestations of Professor
Trueblood's genuine interest in
Michigan golf.

Grange organizers invaded the Col-
lege Field locker-room at Michigan
State this week and excited enthu-
siasm to such a pitch that Aggies
(nee Spartans) joined hands and
formed the B.U.A.A. to encourage ag-
rarian interests of the state., The
full name of the organization is
Bachman's Upstate Agricultural As-
sociation, and the possibility is that
it will get plenty of opportunity to
plow the green fields Saturday."
* * *
Bear Story
According to reports in the Mich-
igan State News Gordon Dahlgren,
M.S.C. guard, has been "counted out"
by the doctors until Oct. 17th due to
a knee injury. This brings to our
mind a bear story concerning Kurt
Warmbein, State's speedy triple-
threat back last year, who was also
reported incapacitated. Warmbein,
however, made himself not only pres-
ent but very much so.
This Dahlgren report sounds like
another bear story. I confidently be-
lieve that he will be in there today.
Freshman Divers
Show Promise In
Early Swim Meet
By RAYMOND GOODMAN
Despite the presence of Ben Grady,
twice an All-American diver, and
Addy Ferstenfeld, the most reliable
reserve that ever sat for two years
on a Michigan bench, the Wolverine
diving team is in a transition year.
"And still they come," Mann said
of his divers when Frank Fehsenfeld
replaced Dick Degener as National
Intercollegiate champ. The remark
was still in order when Der Johnson
took the Collegiate low-board title
last year and Fehsenfeld repeated off
the high-board.
The Orientation Week swimming
meet which Assistant Coach Charles
McCaffree conducted T h u rs d a y
proved that they're still coming. This
year there is a trio-Jack Wolin of
Cleveland, Hal Benham of Indiana-
polis, and Billy Brink of Detroit.
Wolin, winner of the orientation
competition in which he scored 79
points to defeat Brink with 74.75,
dived for Cleveland Heights H.S.
for three years under the tutelage
of Larry Peterson, the National In-
terscholastic meet and he carries
along with him numerous Ohio State
titles. Wolin has met Pope, the
present National Junior A.A.U. title-
holder, twice, winning one encounter
and losing the other.
Benham is well known to the Mich-
igan swimming circle. Not only has
he won the National Junior diving
championship; but last year as a
member of the Indianapolis A.C.
team, of which Fehsenfeld is an
alumnus, he chased Jack Kasley to
a new world's 100-yard breast-stroke
record.
Brink, a graduate of Northwestern
H.S. has held the Detroit city cham-
pionship for two years and boasts
an impressive scholastic record.

New York (A.L.)
Crosetti, ss.....
Rolfe, 3b.......
Dimaggio, cf.
Gehrig, lb.....
Dickey; c .......
Selkirk, rf......
Powell, lf .......
Lazzeri, 2b.....
Gomez, p ........

AB R H O A
5430 1
5 123 6 0
5 1 1 2 0
3223 0
....51 1 0 0
....41 18 17 27 4I

Totals .......

New York (N.L.) AB
Moore, if............5
Bartell, ss .......... 3
Terry, lb ........... 5
Leiber, cf ........... 4
Ott, rf ............. 4
Mancuso, c ..........2
Whitehead, 2b .......4
Jackson, 3b ......... 4
Schumacher, p....... 0
Smith, p ........... 0
Coff man ,p..........0
Davis, z ............ 1
Gabler, p...........0
Danning, zz........1.
Gumbert, p .......... 0
Totals ..........33
Score by innings:

R
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

H
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

0
2
2
6
7
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
.0

Al
0
2I
1
1
0
2
1
21
0!
0
1
0
0
0
0

Yanks Swamp
Giants To Even
Series,_18 To 4
Five Pitchers Bombarded
As Americans Establish
New Run Record
NEW YORK, Oct. 2.-(AP)-World
I Series skies cleared today in Newf
York's baseball civil war but there
was another deluge just the same at
the Polo Grounds.
Instead of the rainfall it took the
form of a Yankee windfall. On the
diamond that was swept by showers
for two previous days, the American
League champions turned on a
downpour of base hits that swamped
the Giants by the record-smashing
score of 18 to 4.
Yanks Batter Gumbert
Clubbing their way back to even
terms at one-all in the subway
scramble for baseball's biggest mon-
ey honors, the Yankees knocked Hal
Schumacher from the box in the
midst of a seven-run outburst in the
third inning and continued a desul-
tory attack that was climaxed in the
ninth by a six-run drive off Harry
Gumbert, the luckless fifth flinger
for the home team.
Gallant Tony Lazzeri; the veteran
second sacker who was supposed to
be near the end of the playing trail,
contributed the biggest wallop by
belting a home run with the bases
full in the third inning, off the relief
flinging of right-handed Dick Coff-
man.
Lazzeri Breaks Mark
Besides duplicating an achievement
recorded only once before in series
annals, by Elmer Smith of Cleveland
against Brooklyn in 1920, Lazzeri
drove home a fifth run with a long
fly, in the seventh inning, thereby
wiping out a mark for runs-batted-in
that he had shared himself with
Babe Ruth and six other world series
batsmen.
Not even this record stood alone
for' long,. however. Catcher Bill
Dickey came through with a ninth-
inning homer, with two men on, that
tied him with Lazzeri for the new
record of five-runs-batted-in during
a single series game.
~ - - --'-

Ann Arbor Peace Disturbed
By Gathering Football Crowd

By FRED BUESSER
Today Ann Arbor ceases to be a
town and becomes a rendezvousafor
60,000 partisan football fans, gath-
ered here to celebrate, to root and to
celebrate.
Only on football Saturdays could as
complete a change be effected in any
spot on earth. Sedate old State
Street becomes "a channel of stream-
ing, honking traffic while sidewalks
that ordinarily feel only the mundane
tread of students feet, re-echo to the
tread of legion after legion of foot-
ball fans as they tramp down to the
Stadium. In place of dull gray and
sickly green text books there are
wild colored blankets and streaming
pennants.
The atmosphere is charged witb
an electric tension as king football
steps forward to rule over Ann Arbor

4 6 27 10

AT TENTION
Your Attention is called to the fact that odr
RENTAL LIBRARY RATES are 10c for the
first three days - 5c per day thereafter.
OPEN EVENINGS CALL FOR and DELIVERY SERVICE
ADRIAN JAFFE
RENTAL LIBRARY
1309 Wilmot St. Phone 2-1631

New York (AM) ...207 001 206-18
New York (Nat) . .010 300 000- 4
Error-Jackson. Runs batted in-
Gehrig 3, Dickey 5, Lazzeri 5, Bar-
tell, Terry 2, Dimaggio 2, Gomez 2,
Rolfe. Two base hits-Dimaggio,
Mancuso, Bartell. Home runs-
Lazzeri, Dickey. Stolen base-
Powell. Sacrifice-Dimaggio. Double
plays-Leiber, Jackson, Bartell. Bases
on balls-Schumacher 4; Smith 1;
Gomez 7; Gabler 3; Gumbert 1.
Strikeouts-Gomez 8, Schumacher 1,
Coff man 1. Losing pitcher -Schu-
macher. Umpires-Geisel, Mager-
kurth, Sommers and Pfirman. Time
of game 2:49.
Ypsi Normal Beats
Northern State, 12-0
YPSILANTI, Oct. 2. - Michigan
Normal's gridders gained their second
victory of the season this afternoon,
defeating2Northern State Teachers
College, 12 to 0.
Augie Defroscia, Normal halfback,
scored the first touchdown on the
first play in the second quarter. Tex
Walker; Dearborn junior, snared a 27
yard pass for the final marker.
Today's Games
Vanderbilt vs. Chicago
Washington University vs. Illinois
Centre vs. Indiana
Northwestern vs. Iowa
N.Y.U. vs. Ohio State
Carnegie vs. Notre Dame
West Virginia vs. Pittsburgh
Maine vs. Columbia
South Dakota State vs. Wisconsin
Oregon vs. Southern California
Stanford vs. Washington State
Idaho vs. Washington
Iowa State vs. Nebraska
Washington & Lee vs. Army
Davidson vs. Navy
Cornell vs. Yale

liI

i

1111

ORATORICAL

Lecture Course

1936-;1937

Oct. 29 - Cornelia
Otis Skinner
Original Dramatic
Sketches
Nov. 12 - Father
Hubbard
"A New Voyage in-
to the Ice Inferno"
with Motion Pictures
Nov. 24 - Bertrand
Russell
(Lord Russell)
"Education and Free-
dom"
Dec. 9 - H. V. Kalt-
enborn
"Kaltenborn Edits
the News"

MAI LLER S
Dairy Fo rm Stores

OIGINAL

NOTE THE LOW
SEASON TICKET PRICES

made with REAL

ICE CREAM

Jan. 14 -
Bruce Bliven
"The Press-Truth,
News or Propagan-
Jan. 21 - Edward
Tomlinson
"Haitian Adventure"
with Color Motion
Pictures

loc

coll1ege ┬žewetry
Now is the Season to Wear Distinctive
jewelry with a Michigan Seal, including

Visit the NEW

RINGS

PINS

LOCKETS

BRACELETS

COMPACTS

CIGARETTE CASES

MILLERS STORE
Liberty, opposite
Michigan Theatre
620 East Liberty
533 South Main

1 Feb. 25 - Captain
John Craig
{.. "Diving Among Sea
i>3+Killers" with Motion
. ; Pictures
Mar. 16-The Mart- "
in Johnsons
"Wild Animals of
'Borneo" with Mo-
tion Pictures
SEASON TICKETS: $3.50, $3.00, $2.75
Mail Orders to: Oratorical Association
3211 Angell Hall, Ann Arbor

h , - ---

$1.00 and up

--- -- .

STROH'S
PABST BLUE RIBBON
FRIAR'S ALE
At All Dealers
J. J. O'KANE, Dist. Dial 3500

ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
Jewelers in the Arcade Since 1916

I

1219 S.

University

III!

I

_

4

1*e

A 1. 1 1.

A n r rne

i I

(rI I

n, i"

H e - NLE-U*-UEU U . U A N lb 1 AUAU L_ \- . -E ;1 ® .......U!eUa-ssu t .

i Lma, 1111

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