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January 22, 1937 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JAN. *2, 1937

PAGE TWO FRIDAY, JAN. ~2, 1937

NEWS'
Of The DAY
(By The Associated Press)
Blacksmith May Plead
Guilty To Murder Charge
MONROE, Mich., Jan. 21.-( ')-
Alcide (Frenchy) Benoit, 24-year-old
blacksmith accused of killing State
Policeman Richards F. Hammond
and handcuffing him to a mail box
post, chose in court today to fight
the charge, but there were indications
he might change his mind.
Orva Jackson, state police ser-
geant, said Benoit was ready to gol
into circuit court tomorrow morning i
at 10 a.m. and plead guilty to a
murder charge.
Captured last night while attempt-
ing to run a state police blockade
in a stolen farm truck, Benoit was
quoted by Prosecutor Francis C.
Ready as admitting in an oral state-
ment that he shot Trooper Ham-
mond Tuesday nightS
In municipal court today he stood
handcuffed to a .state police officer
and spoke just two words, "not
guilty," in response to a question by
Judge John P. Foucher. He ap-
peared only mildly interested
Madrid's Populace In
Good Health, League Told
GENEVA, Jan. 21.-(IP)-Madrid's
populace is in good health and is
adequately nourished despite a great
meat shortage, a League of Nations
group of health experts reported to-'
day as the council began its 96th ses-
sion.
A major subject on the conference]
agenda was that of providing raw
materials for Germany.
It was believed the council, with
the support of the United States and
Japan, both non-members, would
name a committee to survey the
whole problem of economic improve-
ment throughout the world.

'azi Doctrine Heldl
Unsimilar To Jews'
(Continued from Page 1)
through interpretation and discus-
sion of the original doctrines of
Moses, are seen, in the Torah (the
complete and ever-changing body ofi
Jewish law) to exemplify this."
Discusses Marriage
Furthermore, the basis of the He-
brew tradition which frowns on the
marriage of a Jew to a gentile, Dr.,
Heller maintained, "is not biological
(as the doctrine set forth by the
German Nazis) but religious. The'
exponents of Judaism," he said, "be-
ing in numbers and eager to preserve;
their religious heritage amidst an en-
vironment which is dominantly non-j
Jewish, are prone to deem such a
marriage as leading to the immediate]
or ultimate abjuration of their faith.j
One cannot, however, say that Jews
stigmatize a Jew who has married
a non-Jew and has accepted the oth-
er's faith as inferior and ban their
children, even to, the fourth genera-
tion, as racial mongrels."
Biblical testimony, he asserted,
rather than supporting a belief in the
Innate moral excellence of the Jews,
is filled with sections which deal
'with the depravities of Jews and if
gotten up by a clever anti-Semetic
would make many of the contempor-
ary anti-Jewish utterances look mild
and charitable."
Urges Better Understanding
To the assertions of Nazis that'
their antipathy to Jews results from,
a conflict with their respective racial
claims, Dr. Heller retorted:
"I know no Jewry which was as
eager to identify itself with the na-
tional and cultural life of the people
amongst whom they dwelt as were
the German Jew in pre-Hitler days."}
He urged a better understanding
by people of not only Judaism but of
all religions, even advocating a uni-
versity curricula in the philosophy of
religion.j

President Takes Oath From Chief Justice Hughes

Writer To Talk $ Architect Hay Rack
On Non-Fiction Party Is Tentative
Plans for tomorrow night's barn
Prose Writino! dance and sleigh ride for sophomores
i of the College of Architecture have
been made tentative, depending on
Acheson, Reader's Digest I the weather, Richard Trusdell, '39A,
in charge of arrangements, an-
Editor, Is Known For nounced yesterday.
Relief Work In Near East Former plans calling for a hay
rack to take the place of the sleigh
f Barclay Acheson, associate editor as means of transportation to the
of Reader's Digest, will speak on the dance in case there is no snow, have
writing of non-fiction at 4:15 p.m. been cancelled, Trusdell said, and if
today in Natural Science Auditorium, there is no snow the dance will be
under the auspices of Kappa Tau Al- called off.
pha fratersnty. According to present arrangemients
Mr. Acheson became widely known the dance will be held in Miller's
er Eastissccessfulhatindli ag th Barn, six miles east of Ann Arbor on
close of the Great War. He has since Huron River Drive. The group will
Rfe ssialeave the Architecture Building at
traveled extensivey in s 7:30 p.m. and will return from the
Greece, Egypt, the Balkans, and dance about midnight expecting to
Asia Minor. In tuese countries he be back in Ann Arbor about 1 a.m.
is well acquainted with the outstand- Games and dancing will make up
ing figures in government and indus- most of the program. Refreshments
try, including King Boris of Bul- of hot dogs and cider are being
garia, King Zog of Albania, the late planned. The chaperones will be
King Feisal of Iraq, and the late Prof. and Mrs. Ross T. Bittinger
Eleutherios Venizelos of Greece. and Prof. and Mrs. George B. Brig-
For a number of years Mr. Ache- ,ham of the College of Architecture.
son served as a member of the fac-
ulty of American University at Bei-
rut, Syria, and again at one time was
associate general secretary of the Y EO M EN ' O F
New Era Movement of the Presby-
terian Church in charge of field or-
ganization, later occupying a similar

- Associated Press Photo
Standing before Chief Justice Charles Evans Hug hes (left) of the Supreme Court, on the inaugural stand
in frort of the national capitol in Washington, Frank lin Dclane Roosevelt (second from right) is shown
taking his oath of office as President of the United States for his second term, while thousands, drenched to
the skin, watched in a cold driving rain. At the right b hind the President is his eldest son, James Roosevelt,
and standing between the President and Hughes is C. E. Cropley, chief clerk of the Supreme Court.

Prof. Densmore 's Radio Diction,
Pronounciation Class Popular
More Than 35 Schools In determine approximately the ex-
Eight States Tune In To panse of the radio audience. One
means of determining is by receiv-
Radio ,Broadcasts ing requests for mimeographed copies
_of all the words that are discussed on
Prof. Gail E. Densmore's radio the program. Thus far, Professor
class in diction and pronunciation Abbot has had to mail out more
has assumed far more than usual than 2,000 pamphlets of this kind.
significance throughout its eight The word list contains the exact,
weeks of broadcasting this year if words, arranged alphabetically, thatl
the number of activeIlisteners is any are used on the program-and in the
criterion, same sequence. The broadcast, how-
than 35 high schools among ver, presents interesting derivations I
Moretha 35hig scholsamog iof these words, along with a consid-
at least eight different states, have io n he e morlitaodsd
classes that await each week's broad- eration of the more literary words andy
clasoesthe Ui versitykhourodexpressions in current usage which:
Wednesday. There is also an un- uthe average vocabulary should -
clude.
determined number of schools in The latest method found for de-
Canada that tune in on Professor te latecmetofoun rde-
Densores prgra. Th acualtermining the locale of listeners was
Densmore's program. The actual 'found in an unusual, and unexpected
amount of listening classes, however,n.
is not known inasmuch as the data yHe stated that Professor Densmore
here given is voluntarily sent to Pro- He ed fhat ProssDesmoed
fessor Densmore, or to Prof. Waldo in one of his recent broadcasts called
Al--4.T , ..- * ~. .nf. on one of the students that should

Classified Directory

Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-3241.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
(on basis of five average words to line)
Ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid :within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
WANTED
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3,
$5, $8, $25. LADIES' FUR COATS
TYPEWRITERS, OLD GOLD, and
musical instruments. Phone Sam.
6304. 78x
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Single room in good
home, 820 E. University for man
who doesn't smoke. Call Allen
Cook, 9856, in evening. 295
FOR RENT: Two suites, also double
room for boys. Warm. Overstuffed

ROOMS for boys: One double room
$3; one single room, two large win-
dows. Half block from Law School
and campus. Hot water heat, 723
Oakland. 304
FOR RENT: Double room for grad-
uate girls. In private home near
campus. 829 Tappan Ave.
302
FOR RENT: Apartment for two girls,
three rooms, electric refrigeration,
utilities furnished. $32.50. 621 For-
est Ave. Phone 5607. 306
ROOMS FOR RENT: Two comfort-
able double rooms for upper class-
men. Phone 2-1767. 928 Forest.
276
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price. 6x
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Fancy apples. Filtered
sweet cider. Popcorn. Phone 3926.
1003 Brooks St. 301
FOR SALE: Full dress suit, latest
style, only nine months old. Will
sacrifice. Size 36 or 37. Call 7224.
289
HELP WANTED
CAPABLE girl to earn room and
board by housework and cooking
forremployed couple. No laundry
or children. Phone 8735.. 7-8:30
P.m. 299

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furniture. Board if
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desired. 6021
298

FOR RENT: Suite with private bath
and shower for three or four men
students. Also large double, run-
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heat. Phone 8544. 422 E. Washing-
ton. 288

Abbot, Director of University Broad-'
casting.
There are, however, more ways to
Turkey Has Dictator
Is Claim Of Stanton
(Continued from Page 1)
trinaire philosophies, Professor Stan-
ton said, as from the fact that Rus-
sians who early in the life of the
Republic attempted to introduce'
communistic principles were quickly
"liquidated."
"They were invariably found mur-
dered in Turkish villages whereupon
the authorities placed the blame on
the inability of the ignorant peasants
to distinguish the communists from
brigands. The police always arrived!
too late."
Death Is Penalty
Professor Stanton pointed out that
like the other fascist nations whichl
imprison and execute dissenters and
opponents of their major policies,
Turkey punishes with death the or-
ganizers of all movements against
Westernization of the country.
That has been the greatest issue in
Turkey, he said, since the young!
Turk movement was started, and
that is practically the only issue up-
on which there is any large diver-
gence of opinion in Turkey today. But
he did not think the opposition to;
Westernization either powerful or
important.
Illiteracy Main Reason
In Professor Stanton's opinion the
lack of large opposition is mainly due
to the backwardness of the nation,j
the large degree of illiteracy, and the
fact that most of the steps to de-j
crease the number of illiterates, and
build a middle class and proletariat
have come since the young Turk rev-
olution.
"Anyway," he said, "the Turks
aren't tempermentally disobedient."

have been there, and wasn't. On the
following day Shirl Crossman, the
absent student, and also the vocal
mainstay in Bob Steinle's band, re-
ceived a long-distance telephone call
from New York. Her irate parents
wanted to know why she was skipping
classes.
Pdblic Support Aids
Strike- MFarlan
(Continued from Page 1)
but that public opinion also is feared
is evidenced by the delay in shutting
off heat and water after the sit-downI
period began.
Governor Murphy's statement
protnising state relief for the strik-
ers was commended by Professor Mc-
Farlan as "playing politics in the
good sense of the word." That de-
cision, he explained, meant that the
action which the majority of the,
people in the state wanted could
be taken, and taken now, instead of
shortly before an election campaign.I
Irrespective of what kind of settle-
ment is made to the strike, he de-
clared, the history of American labor
has been something entirely new,
both in strike issues and in public
opinion,
HOTEL HELP SITS DOWN
DETROIT, Jan. 21.-(/P)-A sit-
down strike of 17 employes of the
engineering department of the Fort
Shelby Hotel here ended an hour
after it started today when they were
guaranteed wage increases in their
next pay envelopes. The strike was
called at 3 p.m.

1EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
6:00-
WJR Stevenson News.
WWJ Ty Tyson: Dinner four.
WXYZ March of Melody.
CKLW Dream Ship.
6:15-
WJR Musical Program.
WXYZ Fact Finder.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30-
WJR Melody and Rhythm.
WWJ Bu etin s: Odd Facts.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Lane Prescott.
WJR Renfrew of the Mounted
WWJ Soloist.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CKLW Rhumba Rhythm.
7:00-
WJR Mortimer Gooch.
WWJ Amos and Andy..
WXYZ Hockey Parade.
CKLW Shadows on the Clock.
7 :15-
WJR Popeye The Sailor.
WWJ Evening Melodies.
WXYZ Ford Bond.
CKLW Julie Wintz' Music.
7:30-
WJR Music You Love.
WWJ Dudley, Brothers.
CKLW Melody Interlude.
WXYZ The Lone Ranger.
7 :45-
WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Jack Randolph.
CKLW Musical Echoes.
8:00-
WJR Broadway varieties.
WWJ Jessica Dragonette.
WXYZ 'Irene Rich.
CKLW Cesare Sodero Directs.
8:15-
WXYZ Singin' Sam.
830-
0WJR Kay Thompson:
Hal Kemp's Music.
WXYZ Death Valley Days,
CKLW Grum~mits.
9:00_-
WJR Hollywood Hotel.
WWJ Waltz Time.
WXY7, Universal Rhythm.,
CKLW Music Hall.
9:30-
WXYZ Twin Stars.
WWJ Court of Human Relations.
CKLW Wallenstein's "Impressions."
10:00-
WJR Philadelphia Symphony.
WWJ First Nighter.
WXYZ Distinguished Service Awards.
CKLW Witches Tales.
10:30-
WJR Musical Program.
WWJ Varsity Show.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
CKLW Tommy Dorsey's Music.
10:45--
WJR News.
11:00-
WJR Favoiite Melodies.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Harold Stern's Music.
CKLW News Reporter.
11:15-
CKLW Duke Ellington's Music.
11:30-
WJR Mismer Sports:
Eddy Duchin's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Bob MGrew's Music.
CKLW Freddie Martin's Music.
11:45-
WXYZ Earl Hines' Music.
12:00-
WJR Meditations.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Morrey Brennan's Music.
CKLW Mal Hallett's Music.
12:30-
WJR Carl Rave i's Music.
- WXYZ Dance Music.
~I MICHIGAN

position with the China Famine
Fund. For his services to the people
of Greece the government of that
nation decorated him Commander of
the Order of the Redeemer.
No admission fee will be charged,
and special invitations have alreadyl
been extended to students.
TO END MARITIME STRIKE
NEW YORK, Jan. 21.-AP)-A res-!
olution to end the maritime strike in
the East was approved tonight.

January 20 - January 30
HILLEL FOUNDATION - East University and Oakland

I.,

i . . .,

- - ._ _. _ ._ _ _ _ t

Enjoy the Week-End
With the Swirsheling Swtin g of

EXHIBIT of PAINTINGS
By Eminent Jewish American Artists

Charlie Zwick
and The Three Sophisticates
at the
SILVER(
FRIDAY and SA
$1.00 includes food

GRILL
ATURDAY

I

The
Michigan
League

Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
FRIDAY, JAN. 22
CURTAIN at 8 P.M.
instead of 8:30, as advertised.
Curt~ain time has been advanced 30
minutes (for this performance in the
seies only) due to the fact that Play
Production and the School of Music
are cooperating in presenting. "Varsity
:ow," scheduled for the same night
at 10:30 from Hill Auditorium. This
change permits members of the Band
and Glee Club to participate in both
events. Tickets for the broadcast will
be distributed at the door.

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

ADMISSION FREE

=DRUGS

KODAKS -

W
!t. ------ --

,.. .,..... .A.

N

TONIGHT at 8:00

PLEASE NOTE change in time of curtain to avoid conflict
with Varsity Broadcast.
THE GILBERT & SULLIVAN COMIC OPERA
"The Yeomen of the Guard"
PLAY PRODUCTION and THE SCHOOL of MUSIC
BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN - PHONE 6300
MATINEE - SATURDAY

C2I-

1:30 TO 11:30 P.M.

20c TO 5 - 25c After 5 P.M.
THREE DAYS-STARTING TODAY!
Topping All Warner Bros. have taken Broadwaysbig-
La ugh Records! gest hit and made it into the world's funniest
picture-starring goofy Oiwin, the gallop-
I t's the ing gals, and the phony. ponies! Come
SCREEN'S today and have the time of your -life:with
FUN-FEST .

TYPEWRITERS
FOUNTAIN PENS
Student Supplies
31O.T M orril
314 SOUTH STATE STREET

_.
They See By the Paper
that CALKINS-FLETCIER'S
Hot Barbecued Sandwich
with DELICIOUS HOT COFFEE
for only 15c
is the BEST BUY IN TOWN!
Try this Appetizing Combination Today! We know
that you will be more than satisfied with its really
deliciously different taste!
U I ~ W1 ' iY~ia.. 7 ~ ~w~n~u~munflw~ Ie

LAS't TIMES TODAY --
ROBERT YOUNG JANE WITHERS
"SWORN ENEMY" "CAN THIS BE DIXIE"

I

DAILY
MATINEES
till 2 p.m.
- 25c -

GE1103

EVENINGS
and
SUNDAY
after 2 p.m.
- 35c -

- STARTING SATURDAY- --

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