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January 19, 1937 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-19

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PAGE TWO

TUESDAY, JAN. 19, 1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I I-

NEWS
Of The DAY

(By The Associated Press).
Fourth Passenger
Dies From Air Crash
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 18.-()-The
toll of the Newhall plane crash
reached four today with the death
of Earl E. Spencer, president of the
Stromberg Electric Company of Chi-
cago.
Others injured fatally when the
huge transport ship crashed last
Tuesday were Martin Johnson, the
explorer; James Braden, Cleveland
industrialist, and A. L. Loomis of
Omaha.
Army Air Maneuvers
To Be Held At Oscoda
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.-(AP)-
The war department ordered the
army's general headquarters air force
today to hold its mid-winter maneuv-
ers at Oscoda, Mich~, near Saginaw
Bay, instead of in New England.
Lack of army flying fields in Maine
and Vermont caused the change.
State Budget Asks
For $199,994,827
LANSING, Jan. 18.-(P)-A state
budget calling for the legislative ap-
propriation of $199,995,827.03 for the
next biennium reached completion
today.
George R. Thompson, state budget
director, said he would report the
budget to the secretary of the Sen-
ate and clerk of the House Tuesday
morning.
Accompanying the budget later in
the session will be a supplemental
appropriation bill asking the legisla-
ture to legalize the expenditure of
$12,109,000 during the present bien-
nium in addition to the amount ap-
propriated by the 1935 legilature.
University Concert
Band Plays Jan. 24
The University Concert Band,
picked from the 110 men who played
at the football games and pep meet-
ings last fall, under the direction of
William D. Revelli, will present their
first program of the year at 4:30 p.m.
Jan. 24 in Hill Auditorium.
The first part of the program will
feature the works of Johann Sebas-
tian Bach; Come Sweet Death, Si-
ciliano and Jesu, Joy Man's Desiring
will be played.
A piece by a new composer in the
field of the American concert band,
Erik W. G. Leidzen's Springtime
which has been chosen as a contest
number for this year's National Band
contests will be the second of the
Band's offerings.
Donald Marrs, '40SM, will present
a Euphonium solo, Beautiful Colo-
rado by Joseph De Luca.
Part four will be in a lighter vein.
The band will play some of Rudolph
Friml's favorites. Two new compo-
sitions for bands, Sunday morning
at Glion by F. R. Bendel and Deep
Purple by Peter De Rose will close
the program.

Barclay Acheson Will
Speak On Writing Here
Barclay Acheson, associate editor
of the Readers' Digest Magazine, will
speak on the writing of non-fiction at
4:15 p.m. Friday in the Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium, under the auspices
of Kappa Tau Alpha fraternity.
Mr. Acheson became widely known
through his successful handling of
Near East relief operations at the
close of the World,War.
No admission fee will be charged
PROF. EARL V. MOORE RETURNS
Prof. Earl V. Moore of the School
of Music, recovering from influenza
that has kept him at home since the
beginning of the year, returned yes-
terday to his office for the first time
since the Christmas vacation.
I

Final Examination Schedules

Im

First Semester, 1936-37
College of Literature, Science and the Arts, School of
School of Music, School of Forestry and Conservation,
Business Administration, and Graduate School.

Education,
School of

Exam
Group
Letter
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R

Time of Exercise
To be used only
in case no
group letter is listed

proverent In Government's
Auditing System Is Foreseen'

Time
of
Exam

Monday-
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Special
Special
Special
Special

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at'

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday,
Friday,
Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Thursday,
Thursday,
Saturday.
Saturday,
Saturday,

Feb. 8,
Feb. 5,
Feb. 3.
Feb. 1,
Feb. 9,
Feb. 1,
Feb. 9,
Feb. 8,
Feb. 2,
Feb. 3,
Feb. 2,
Feb. 10,
Feb. 5,
Feb. 4,
Feb. 4,
Feb. 6,
Feb. 6,
Jan. 30,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

6:00-
WJR Stevenson News.
WWJ Ty Tyson: Dinner Hour (6:10).
WXYZ March of Melody.
CKLW Phil Marley.
6:15--
WJR Hot Dates in Music.
WXYZ Fact Finder.
CKLW News and Sports.
6 :30-
WJR Melody and Rhythm.
WWJ Bulletins: Odd Facts.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Enoch Light's Music.
6:45-
WJR Renfrew of the Mounted.
WWJ C. Herbert Peterson.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
7 :00-
WJR Poetic Melodies.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Easy Aces.
CKLW Musical Echoes.
7 :15-
WJR- Diamond City News.
WDWJDrama: Evenilig Melodies.
WXYZ Original Jesters.
CKLW Frank Daily's Music.
7:30-
WJR Alexander Woollcott-
Town Crier.
WWJ Inauguration Eve in Wash-
inton.
WXYZ Green Hornet.
CKLW Variety Revue.
7:45-
WJR Boake Carter.
g:00--
WJR Hammerstein's Music Hall.
WWJ Leo Reisman's Music.
WXYZ Dude Ranch.
CKLW Music for Dancing.
:30-
WJR Al Jolson, Sid Silvers, Martha
Raye: Victor Young's Music.
WWJ Wayne King's Music.
WXYZ Edgar Guest in Welcome
Valley.
CKLWEchoes of Stage.
9:00--
WJR Al Pearce and Gang.
WWJ Sidewalk Interviews.
WXYZ Ben Bernie and All the Lads.
CKLW Gabriel Heatter.
9:15--
CKLW Charioteers.
9:30-
WJR Jack Oakie, Benny Goodman,
G e~rge Stoll.
WWJ FredsAstaire: Johnny
Green's Music.
WXYZ Husbands and Wives.
CKLW Americana
10:00-
WXYZ Frank Simon Directs Band.
CKLW Wallenstein's Sinfonietta.
10:30-
WJR Musical Program.
WWJ Jimmy Fidler.
WXYZ Electoral College Banquet.
CKLW Electoral College Banquet.
10:45-
WJR News.
WWJ Inaugural Oddities.
11:00---
WJR Scenes in Harmony.
WWJ Tonight's Hockey:
Dance Music,
WXYZ Hockey Scores.
CKLW News Reporter.
11:15--
CKLW Arthur Warren's Music.
WXYZ Johnny Hamp's Music.
11:30-
WJR Wismer Sports; Ed. Hayes'
Interview.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Frankie Masters' Music.
CKLW Freddy Martin's Music.
12:00--
WJR Carl Ravell's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Griff Williams' Music.
CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
12:30-
WJR Happy Felton's Music.
WXYZ Gruff Williams' Music.
CKLW. Emerson Gill's Music.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Jan. 30 to Feb. 10, 1937
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time
of Exercise is the time of tie first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the
first quiz period,
Drawing and laboratoiy work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned
examination periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor
J. C. Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building before Jan.
27. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should
receive notification from his instructor of the time and place of his
appearance in each course during the period Jan. 30 to Feb. 10.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of exami-
nation. No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.

Prof. Benson Describes
Changes Proposed By
President's Advisers
By TUURE TENANDER
A very distinct improvement in the
system of auditing and supervising'
the nation's finances will result when,
and if, the recommendations made by
the President's Committee on Admin-
istrative Management for revision of
the fiscal auditing system are enact-
ed, Prof. George C. S. Benson of thej
University Bureau of Government
said yesterday.
"There is no large, modern govern-
ment in the world," Professor Benson'
said, "that tries to get along with
the system of auditing now in use
in this country, nor does one find
such a system used in industry."
Critized By President
Much justified criticism has been
made, he said, of the way in which
the office of the Comptroller General
has been used. President Roosevelt,
in his message to Congress on reor-
ganization last week, said in part:
"The committee does not spare the
Camptroller General for his failure
to give the Congress a prompt and
complete audit each year, totally in-
dependent of administration, as a
means of holding the executive truly,
to account; nor for his unconstitu-
tional assumption of executive power;
nor, for the failure to keep the ac-
counting system of the government
up to date to serve as the basis of
information, management andscon-
trol . .."
System Sometimes Fails
"The pre-auditing system now
used," Professor Benson explained,
"fails to catch certain errors that
would in all probability be caught if
a periodic method of auditing were
used. It is always recognized that
the control of expenditures before
they are made is an essential part
of the administrative process but the
time for a check-up from the out-
side is after the expenditures have
been made," he said.
One of the chief criticisms of the
General Accounting Office at present,
in Professor Benson's opinion, is the
fact that the Comptroller General
has "arrogated to himself powers
that do not belong to him."
"The Comptroller General is not
an administrative officer and does

not cooperate with other adminis-1
trative officials," he said. "There has
been too legalistic and technical an
interpretation of the office' powers
with no eye for real governmental
economy," he added.
Another criticism made by Pro-
fessor Benson of the present system
is that much of the machinery of the
General Accounting Office merely
duplicates that of the executive de-
partments and of the Budget Bu-
reau.j
The changes advocated by the
President on the basis of his com-
mittee's report would provide for an
auditor general who would conduct
an independent post audit of the
fiscal transactions.
"The recommendations provide for
giving the executive the right to pre-
scribe auditing systems and to settle
claims against the government," Pro-
fessor Benson said. "The Secretary
of the Treasury and the Attorney
General would also have the right to
interpret and decide upon legal fiscal
issues," he added.
Favors Periodic Audits
"I favor strongly the adoption of
all the fiscal recommendations made
by the committee," Professor Ben-
son said, "with the exception of the
continuous auditing method. I be-
lieve the adoption of a process of
periodic audits is to be preferred
over the continuous system," he said.
If the recommendations are adopt-
ed. Professor Benson feels, the re-
sponsibility for expenditures will be
placed firmly in the executive branch.
Under the present system, he said,
the Comptroller General is not re-
sponsible to anyone and often cases
have had to be decided by the United
States Supreme Court in order to re-
voke the mandate handed down by
the Comptroller General.
"Under the proposed revision," Pro-
fessor Benson said, "the auditor-gen-
eral must submit a report of any ex-
penditures under question to Con-
gress if he and the Secretary of the
Treasury do not agree on whether
or not the item is to be allowed."
INSTRUCTIONS
Every form of dancing.
Open 10 to 10. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldig.Ph. 9695

h.

Adelphi To Nominate
New Officers Tonight
The Adelphi House of Representa-
tives, men's forensic society, will hold
an important meeting at 7:30 p.m.
today in its room on the fourth floor
of Angell Hall, for the purpose of
nominating officers for the next se-
mester.
At this time also the annual picture
for the 'Ensian will be taken and
Bruce Johnson, '38, president, urges
that all members come promptly so
that the preliminary business of the
meeting can be finished before the
picture is taken.
ANN ARBOR SEEKS GRANT
Upon decision of the City Council
at its regular meeting last night,
City Engineer George Sandenburg
will be sent to Washington, D.C. to-
day to try to get a grant from the
national government for the city
water softener.

LAST TIMES TODAY !
STAYS O&
.And it's a crime
if you stay away
from Joe's best show.

U

Time of Exercise
Monday at 8
Monday at 9
Monday at 10
Monday at 11
Monday at 1
Monday at 2
Monday at 3

Tim'2 ;f Examination
Monday, Feb. 8 8-12
Friday, Feb. 5 8-12
Wednesday, Feb. 3 8-12
Monday, Feb. 1 8-12
Tuesday, Feb. 9 2-6
Monday. Fen. 1 2-6
Tuesday, Feb. 9 8-12

Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, Feb. 8
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Wednesday, Feb. 3
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Wednesday, Feb. 10
Friday, Feb. 5
Thursday, Feb. 4
Saturday, Feb. 6
Saturday, Feb. 6
*Thursday, Feb. 4
*Saturday, Jan. 30
Thursday, Feb. 4
*Tuesday, Feb. 9

E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 2
Surv. 1, 2, 4; German
M.E. 3; French; Draw. 1, 2
E.E. 2a; Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4;
Spanish
Economics
Drawing 3

2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
8-12
there is no con-

I

TOMORROW
TWO FEATURES !
ROBERT YOUNG
FLORENCE RICE
"SWORN ENEMY"
- and
JANE WITHERS
"CAN THIS BE
DIXIE"

_I

1.

*This may be used as an irregular period provider
flict with the regular printed schedule above.

I

Place advertisements with Classified OPENING for roommate who wants
Advertising Department. Phone 2-3241. quiet, well-regulated place for
The classified columns close at five study. Class A house, near Union.
o'clock previous to day of insertion. phn90128
Box numbers may be secured at no Phone 9081. 281
extra charge.
Cash in advancele per reading line FOR RENT: Double room with sleep-
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
(on basis of five average words to line) ing porch. Reasonable. 1105
ing line for three or more insertions. Church. Phone 2-2672. 285
Minimum three lines per insertion. _____________________________
Telephone rftte - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimun FOR RENT: Front suite-for boys--
threeolinper insertion. 515 Lawrence. Call 3301. 286
10% discount if paid within ten days -______ ___________
from the date of last insertion. ROOMS FOR RENT: Two comfort-
able double rooms for upper class-
WANTED men. Phone 2-1767. 928 Forest.
TWO PRE-MEDIC students desire 276
another to share large 2-room, FOR RENT: Single or double room.
steam-heated suite with 6 windows Inner spring mattress. Hot and
and two closets. 500 Catherine St. cold shower. Available Feb. 7th.
Phone 9749. 280 1102 Prospect off E. University.
FURNISHED house near campus. 272
Wanted by young faculty couple. DESIRABLE single room for man
No children. Call 8449. 273 student. 2nd floor. 3 other roomers.
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any Mrs. Charles Eaton.- 421 Thomp-
old and new suits, overcoats at $3, son. 6175. 279
$5, $8'. $25. LADIES FUR COATS, NEAR MICHIGAN UNION: Wa'm
TYPEWRITERS, OLD GOLD, and 2-room suite in Class A. quiet
musical instruments. Phone Sam. home. Phone 9081. 282
6304. 78x _
FOR RENT LAUNDRY
PLEASANT, warm quiet room, $4. LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Call 6552, 283 Careful work at a low price. 6x
FOR RENT: Large, light double room FOR SALE
for men. Next semester. Shower.
Phone 2-2605. 278 POR SALE: String bass. Good condi-
tion and tonal quality. Reasonable
SINGLE and double room close to price. Call 2-1698. Ask for Ken.
campus. Phone 5080. 541 Packard. 287
284 ____287__________

N.,L.R.B. Action
In G. M. Strike
Is Discussed
(Continued from Page 1)
onize either the American Federation
of Labor (the craft group) or the
Committee for Industrial Organiza-
tion (the industrial group, opponent
of the A.F. of L.).
(2) "As it is now constituted, the
Board would also be very reluctant to
take any move that would put it in a
partizan position."
Representation Is Question
No one doubts, it was pointed out,
that one of the main purposes of the
Board is to determine representation.
And that is the big question in the
General Motors strike. The United
Automobile Workers union demands
recognition as the sole bargaining
agency, and at the same time gives
no conclusive proof that it has the
majority of the workers needed to
entitle it, under the act, to be recog-
nized as such.
Indeed, many observers doubt thatI
the union does have a majority of
members or even a majority of sym-
pathizers among the non-union
strikers, as large as its minority in
that field may be. So, Professor

Riegel declares, the union, thus be-
ing in an unsure position, will prob-
ably not ask the Board to conduct
a vote.
So, since it appears that the Board
will not act unless asked to do so by
the union, it will not act at all be-
cause the union will not request it.
Board Has Two Duties
Yet, as Prof. Edgar Durfee of the
Law School asserts, "the outstand-
ing idea of the whole statute is to
provide machinery for the determin-
ation of labor representation."
The Board has two essential duties,
Professor Reigel explained. The first
has to do with the determining of
jurisdictional lines, i.e., saying what
unions shall be concerned with what
industries and what sections of the
country. It is here that possible dif-
ficulties with the A.F. of L. and the
C.I.O. loom.
The second, bearing more directly
on the Michigan situation, deals with
the determination of who is going to
(Continued on Page 4)
CHELSEA
FLOWER SHOP
203 East Liberty Phone 2-2973
Flowers for All Occasions

A ttention:
FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES,
STUDENT ORGANIZATONS -

Your group picture and

any

,additional

pictures

you

may desire to appear on your page in the

1937 Mich-

iganension

must be taken before JANUARY 24th.

9
0g
" o9
u//
-- -

,bar= itt
s SWIN 'etas p113r®

if you're
onna Flunk
you re
onna Flunk

'

Avoid delay and arrange today with Messrs. Spedding,
Rentschler or Dey for your sittings.
The 1937
MICH IGAN ENSIAN

BUT
YOU GOTTA EAT!

AN'A
'® Mf-

OPENING WEDNESDAY

I

ill

11

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