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January 08, 1937 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, .JAN. 8, 1937

PAGE TWO FRIDAY, JAN. 8, 1937

Shooting Scene,
Triangle Told
By Betty Baker
Shooting Was Accidental,
Defense Seeks To Show;
Husband To Take Stand
(Continued from Page 1)
corrected herself: "I mean hammer.
I didn't know, then, that the ham-
mer had anything to do with making,
a gun fire easily."
Mrs. Baker, who for 12 years di-
rected student help at Helen New-
berry Residence, told how she met
Mr. Baker in 1928 and Schneider in
1929. "Al brought home a bowling
team of which he and Cub were
members," she said, "and both he
and Al drove taxicabs for the same
company at that time."
Tells Of Love
In response to her counsel's ques-
tioning, she told how her husband in-
vited Schneider to live at their home
in July, 1935, "because he felt sorry
for Cub, who stayed in an attic room
so hot he couldn't sleep. He moved
his clothing in in September, paying
no room rent at my husband's sug-
gestion and mine."
When, in the fall of 1930, Schnei-
der first told her he loved her, Mrs.
Baker said she told him he was "just
a child." Schneider was then 18 and
Mrs. Baker 24.
Mrs. Baker testified that it was
a year after meeting Schneider that
she first had sexual relations with
him, and that they continued until
the time she killed him June 29, 1936.
"He persisted in his love for me," she
said, "and I loved him. When I
thought he didn't love me, my world
was completely shattered."
Couldn't Tell Al
"And all this time you were a mar-
ried woman." Prosecutor Rapp hurled
the question at her.
"Yes," she answered in a low voice.
Mrs. Baker explained that Schnei-
der constantly urged her to marry
him and ask her husband for a di-
vorce. Once, she said, she made up
her mind to do it, "But when I saw
how sad Al looked, I just couldn't
do it. I just couldn't, that's all."
She and Schneider made many
trips away from Ann Arbor together,
most of which Patrolman Baker
knew of, she testified. Later she told
how she tried to "keep away from
Cub by getting him dates with other
wonien, but he refused to go unless
I went along."
"You didn't love your husband,"
Prosecutor Rapp stated more than
asked.
Loved The Both
"Yes, I dlid," she returned evenly.
"But he just couldn't satisfy you,
is that it, Mrs. aer?"
"I loved them both," she said.
"Oh, you loved them both did
you," the Prosecutor continued. "You
wanted Al Baker to satisfy you fi-
nancially and Schneider to satisfy
you sexually."
"No," Mrs. Baker said.
"Didn't you say your husband was
built like a child and couldn't satisfy
you?" Mr. Rapp pursued his ques-
tioning while a curious courtroom
looked at Patrolman Baker, seated
at the opposite end of the room from
the witness stand
"Yes, I believe I did use that ex-
pression," she answered.
It was at this point that Circuit
Court .Judge George W. Sample ad-
journed the court until 9 a.m. today.

G. M. Exaggerates
Fears-Dichinson
(Continued from Page 1)
mobiles bought if the strike lasts only
a few weeks (and thus cause more
unemployment than would ordinar-
ily be the case) is difficult to say,"
he stated.
"I believe this season would be a
very busy one. They (the automo-
bile manufacturers) want to get the
dealers stocked up and sell while the
models are new."
In comparing the Committee for
Industrial Organization's drive to
unionize the mining industry with
the. present strike in Michigan, Pro-
fessor Dickinson expressed the opin-
ion that John L. Lewis, head of the
C.I.O., is meeting much better or-
ganized opposition than he did in
the mining industry.
r

Norris At Opening Of Unicaeral Legislature

Murphy Lauds
Work Of Three
Faculty Men
(Continued from Page 1)
sideration and recommend its en-
actment."
Ex-Governor Fitzgerald also rec-
ommended the bill describing it as
"widely recognized as the most mod-
ern work of its kind." He further
suggested that the measure be adopt-
ed by the Legislature intact, with no
amendments. .
Enumerates Proposals
The proposals of the Michigan
Welfare and Relief Study Commis-
sion, which call for the creation of
three new welfare relief, mental hy-
giene and correction departments to
take the place of 10 now existing
State agencies, were enumerated in
length by the Governor and recom-
mended for study. Besides Mr. Smith,
who is also director of the Michigan
Municipal League, other faculty
members on this commission are Pro-
fessor Haber and Prof. Arthur Dun-
ham of the history department.
As reported in The Daily yesterday,
the welfare commission is scheduled
to meet in Lansing today to draft
appropriate legislation embodying the
proposals of this report for submis-
sion to the Legislature in the near
future.
In discussing the Unemployment

Insurance Bill, one of the principal
provisions which the Governor point-
ed out as needing change was that
which exempts from taxation during
1937 and thereafter the first $6,000 of
wages paid annually by each employ-
er subject to the act. He explained
that "No such exemption is permit-
ted by the Federal act, and the re-
sulting, loss of revenue to the state
unemployment fund will be about
$1,000,000 in 1937 and approximately
$1,500,000 in 1938 and subsequent
years, unless those employers of eight
or more persons who are subject to
the Federal tax should voluntarily
waive the exemption in order to ben-
efit the State fund and claim a cor-
responding credit on their Federal
tax returns.
Also approximately 200,000 workers
belonging to small concerns who
would otherwise come under this act
are ineligible according to this pro-
vision, Governor Murphy further ex-
plained, and he added that in the
financing of benefits, the exemption
will cause the act to work unfairly.
In the case of an employer whose
annual payroll is $7,000, he said,
"With an exemption of $6,000, only
a small fraction of his total payroll
will be taxed, merely one-seventh.

But all his employes will be eligible
for benefits. Obviously this concern
is not carrying its just share of the
cost."
In case the Supreme Court should
declare the Federal Social Security
Act unconstitutional, Governor Mur-
phy advised that the State bill should
not be allowed automatically to be-
come invalid also, as it would under
a provision now in the State act. He
suggested the repeal of this provi-
sion, saying "unemployment compen-
sation is a good thing for Michigan,
regardless of the federal law's fate."

1- -

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EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

I
6 :00--
WJR Stevenson News.
wWJ Ty Tyson: Dinner Hour.
WXYZ March of Melody.
CKLW Mario Morelli.
6:15-
WJR Musical Program.
WXZ Fact Finder.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30--
W/JR Melody and Rhythmn.
WWJ Bulletins : Odd Facts.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Melody Lane.
6 :45--
W,JR Renfrew of the Mounted
WWJ Soloist.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
7:00-
WJR Mortimer Gooch.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Mary Small.
CKLW Shadows on the Clock.
WJR Popeye The Sailor.
WWJ Evening Melodies.
WXYZ Ford Bond.
CKLW Julie Wintz' Music.
7 :30-
W/JR Ray Heatherton.
WWJ Dudley Brothers.
CKLW Variety Revue.
WXYZ The Lone Ranger.
7 :45-
WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Jack Randolph.
CKLW Roberts Rhumba.
8:00-
WJR Broadway Varieties.
WWVJ Jessica Dragonette.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
CKLW Cesare Sodero Directs.
8:15-
WXYZ Singin' Sam.
8 :30-
WJR Kay Thompson, Ray
eatherton: Hal Kemp's Music.
WXYZ Death Valley Days.
CKLW Grummits.
900-
WJR Hollywood Hotel.
WWJ Waltz Time.
WXYZ Universal Rhythn.
CKLW 'Music Hall.
9:30--
WXYZ Twin Stars.
WWJ Court of Human Relatipns.
CKLW Red Norvo's Music.
10:00-
WJR Philadelphia Symphony.
WWJ First Nighter.
WXYZ Les Arquette.
CKLW Witches Tales.
10:30--
WJR Musical Program.
WWJ Soloist.
WXYZ Lowry Clark.
CKLW Impressions.
10:45-
WJR News.
WWJ Four Showmen.
11:00--.
V/JR To Be Announced.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ George Kavanaugh's Music:
CKLW News Reporter.
11:15-
CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
11:30-
WJR Wismer Sports; Eddy
Duchin's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Bob McGrew's Music.
CKLW Freddie Martin's Music.
11:45-
WXYZ Earl Hines' Music.
12:00-
WJR Meditations.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Morrey Brennan's Music.
CKLW Mal Hallett's Music.
12:30-
WJR Carl Ravell's Music.
WXYZ Rito Tio's Music.
CKLW Leo Reisman's Music.
1:00-
CKLW Sammy Kaye's Music.

- Associated Press Photo
Senator George W. Norris, of Nebraska, instead of attending the
opening session of Congress, assisted i'n inaugurating the Nebraska
unicameral legislature at Lincoln, which he sponsored. He stood with
Lieut.-Gov. Walter Jurgensen (right) on the speaker's stand as the only
law-making body of its kind in the United States undertook its duties.
States Await Results As Lone
Unicameral Leorslature Opens

PRINTING
LOW RATES - FINE WORK
Dial 2-1013 . . 308 North Main Street
Downtown, North of Main Post Office
The ATHENS PRESS
SEE US FIRST

i

I

k,

The Nebraska unicameral legisla-E
ture, the only one-house law-making1
body of its kind in the United States,
-and which had its opening session
in Lincoln, Neb., this week, is an ex-
periment awaited anxiously by other
state governments and political sci-
entists.
Fathered by Sen. George W. Norris
(Ind., Neb.) for many years, the plan
was adopted by a constitutional
amendment by the Nebraska elec-
torate in 1934.
Representatives, 43 in number, were
Colds Best Cured
By Resting Iri Bed
(Continued from Page 1)
that swimming is a marvelous exer-
cise when properly utilized, and it is
to be encouraged for those who are
in perfect health. No person with the
symptoms of a cold in the head
should enter the pool, not only be-
cause of the ill effect of undue expo-
sure, but also because of the menace
to other swimmers, he said.
"We should not lose sight of the
fact that the common cold is a fore-
runner of pneumonia and responsi-
ble for more than ninety per cent of
sinus and mastoid infections," Dr.
Furstenburg declared.
Certain preventive measures should
be followed, he said. "Prolonged cold
plunges and undue exposure to the
inclement weather should be avoided.
The value of fresh, circulating air in
our living quarters, and daily exercise
out of doors cannot be too greatly
emphasized. Excessively dry, warm
air causes a disturbance of normal
repsiratory function and predisposes
to the development of colds in the
head," he warned.
Ge- okt ora hswe

elected last November and assumed
their seats this week.
Senator Norris, one of the few fa-
mous United States statesmen who
are relatively poor financially and
one of the most popular statesmen
his state has ever known, neglected
the opening of the 75th. Congress for
the opening of his unicameral legis-
lature.
He ran for Senator last November
only at the behest of President
Roosevelt and about 40,000 Nebras-
kans who signed a petition for his
nomination.
It has long been a. contention of
many political scientists that two
houses in state legislatures are not
only unnecessary but also harmful
to progressive legislation. They point
out that the national bicameral leg-
islative body has some excuse, for the
states must be represented both as
separate entities and as population
centers, a need which the state does
not now have.
Food for
tonceiuration
gives
Power to Pass
East Liberty at State Street

Superior
MILK-ICE CREAM
Week-End Special
VAN ILLA -BUTTERSCOTCH CHI P
Superior Dairy Company
Phone 23181

The twin stars of "The Big
Broadcast" are here again?
Adolph Zukor presents
GIRL"
A Paramount Picture with
Martha Ray" Shirley Ross
Robert Cummings " Louis DaPron
Monroe Owsley e ARCNAAUD
Brand New
March of Time
Grantlanid. Rice Sportlight

I

LEARN WHAT

THE NEW THREE-LIGHT

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I

ClassifiedDirectory

I

Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11e per reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one or two insertions. 10c perrread-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10%discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
WANTED
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3,
$5, $8, $25. LADIES FUR COATS,
TYPEWRITERS, OLD GOLD, and
musical instruments. Phone Sam.
6304. 78x
WANTED: Girl to share apartnent
for three. Immediate reply neces-
sary. Phone 8828. 1338 Washtenaw.
230
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price. 6x

FOR RENT
WEST-SIDE. T h r e e unfurnished
rooms and bath. $40.00. All utilities
furnished. 313 Pauline Blvd. 231
ROOMS for girls available second
,semester in approved graduate
house. 1327 S. University. 233
FOR RENT: Room 4 blocks from
campus. $3.00 per week. Phone
7345. 237
FOR SALE
FANCY EATING and cooking apples,
sweet filtered cider, popcorn. Ph.
3926; 1003 Brooks St. 236
NOTICES
EXPERT GERMAN TUTORING by
native German. Call 8590 or in-
quire 4122 N.S. Dr. Braun. 238
EVENING CLASSES in shorthand,
typing, and bookkeeping at the
Ann Arbor High School. The sec-
ond semester begins Monday eve-
ning, Jan. 11. Registration fee $4
pei subject. For further informa-
tion, call 5797. 235

Get back to normal this week
with the Swisheling Swing of
Charlie Zwick
ait the

.'t /

s

SILVER GRILL
FRIDAY and SATURDAY

The
Michigan
League

$1.00 includes jfod

e

Old-fashioned lamps with.dark
shades and cosed tops focused a
small pool of bright light in one spot
and left the rest of the room in murky
shadow. Even when one sat directly
under the lamp, the sharp contrast be-
tween the light and the surrounding dark-
ness was trying on the eyes. All this has been
changed with the modern new 3-light lamp.
A light shade with a light lining---open
at both top and bottom-throws a great
deal of light into the room. The lamp
has a diffusing bowl under the shade,
which throws part of the light upward to.
the ceiling, and this is reflected back and
spread over a large area, eliminating harsh
shadows and providing roomwide light.
The bowl also diffuses the downward
light, so that it is soft and pleasant,
without glare.
The Sight Meter will show you instantly
why this lamp is-superior to your present
lamps. To guard eyesight and make
reading, writing, sewing and other seeing
tasks easy and comfortable, choose a 3-
light lamp for your living room. You
will be amazed at the difference it makes!

DIFFUSING BOWL THROWS
PART OF LIGHT TO CEILING
This lamp provides two
kinds of light-- direct and
indirect. A diffusing howl
under the shadethrows part
of the light upward to the
ceiling, and diffuses the
downward light so that it is
soft and restful.f .arsh
shadows are eliminated.

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LAST DAY ----

"LONGEST "EASY TOt
NIGHT" TAKE"
Starting Saturday! 1937's First Big Fun Show!

f

ALACE CABS
ALL NEW CARS

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4:] GRAci"
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- Adolph Znko.
air
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