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December 03, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THIU

RSDAY, DEC. 3, 1936

Persian History
Can Be Traced
ByArchitecture
The history of Persia and the va-)
rious peoples ruling it through the,
centuries can be followed through the+
architecture of the country, Prof.'
Mehment Aga-Oglu pointed out in a
lecture yesterday in Room D, Alum-'
ni Memorial Hall.'
Professor Aga-Oglu spoke on the
photographs of, Persian architecture
now on exhibition in the North Gal-
lery of Alumni Memorial Hall, loaned
to the University by the American
Institute of Persian Archeology.
The Persian nation is one of the
oldest civilizations of the world, hav-
ing a highly cultured country as early+
as thegsixth century B.C., Professor
Aga-Oglu pointed out the various
peoples who controled the land. Earl-
iest architecture shows the influence1
of Babylonian monuments with the

added Persian artistic taste and re-
finement.
The beginning of real Persian ar-
chitecture was during the Sesanian
Dynasty before the Arab invasion. It
is noted for itslogical ground plans.
An outstanding contribution is the
development of the squnich, a meth-
od of changing a square base to a
circular one for the placement of a
dome. Persians solved this problem
early in the history of architecture.
Many of the buildings of this periodl
showa simplicity which is very com-
parable with modern monuments
This simplicity is contrasted by elab-
orate detail on the interiors of the
buildings, delicate stucco Arabesque
decorating the wall spaces.
Professor Aga-Oglu continued
showing the following influences in
architecture of the Arabs in the
seventh century, the Turkish influ-
ences in the eleventh and twelfth
centuries and later the Mongul and
Tinurid.
Although only approximately 100
photographs are on display, several
more hundred are in the store room
of Alumni Memorial Hall.

Courtis Describes
'Model Democracy'
(Continued from Page 1)
gain a cooperation of a sort little
used in this country. President Wil-
son, according to the professor, also
tried to gain this advantage but was
not successful.
In an address last year in Kala-
mazoo, Professor Courtis referred to
this concept of government and asked
his audience not to think of him as
a communist, but merely as a teacher{
with the interests of society at heart.
In his address he pointed out that
even those men who drafted the Dec-
laration of Independence knew that
the type of. government must at some

time be changed during the growth of
the country. He hopes to see the
change come in the form he out-
lined in this interview.
"Thus if we teach our young people
the science of 'cooperation'," con-
cluded Professor Courtis, "they will

strive only to aid society by helping
themselves to gain their freedom."
There are many details to this plan
which need fuller consideration, he
added, but a true democracy based
on the brothehood of men in his
dream for the distant future.

4 _

el

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Friday - Saturday - Sunday
Miller's Famous Hot Fudge Sundae
8c --- 2 for 15c
LUNCH at Miller's this noon - Chop Suey and drink
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Hot Fudge Sundae.
All for 23c

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CHELSEA
FLOWER SHOP
203 East Liberty Phone 2-2973
Flowers for All Occasions

Miller's Dairy Farm Stores

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LET'S TALK SENSE!

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HY PAY for delivery charges alone to express your laun-
dry home when it only costs a few cents more on our NEW
ROUGH DRY Students' Bundle, called for and delivered free in

Ann Arbor. Someone in your family is paying

76c (minimum

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trouble of sending it to a laundry at home or has that' extra
amount to wash herself. Why not spare yourself this added
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four laundries listed below:

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Shirts, Extra . . .
Full Dress Shirts not included in this

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49. #
Christmas Suggestions
for
GIFTS THAT WILL ALWAYS PLEASE !
STATIONERY - WRITING CASES - DESK SETS
LIBRARY BOXES - BILL FOLDS - FOUNTAIN PENS
GIFT WRAPPINGS - PAPER - RIBBON - TISSUE
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2 Suits of Underwear
3 Shirts
6 Handkerchiefs
3 Pairs of Socks
2 Bath Towels
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Handkerchiefs, Extra. Ic
Our Rough Dry (semi-finish) Bandle Service for students is eco-
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(Write home today and explain these savings to your parents-
or better yet, send this ad home -it explains itself!)
INDRY TROJAN LAUNDRY
85 Phone 9495

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