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September 29, 1936 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-09-29

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SEPT 29, 1936

THE MICHIGAN P A-ILY

THE MICHIGAN IIATTm_ a.V

.........._ ....... .......... _ ....

Library Books
To Be Available
EverySunday
Periodical, Main Reading
Rooms To Remain Open
From 2 To 9 P.M.
Books from all parts of the Main
Library instead of from merely the
main reading room and periodical
room will be available for Sunday
work this year again, William Bishop,
director of the library announced last
week.
However, since only the main read-
ing room and periodical room will
be open on Sunday, he said that stu-
dents must request the desired vol-
umes on Saturday from the assistant
in the reading room where the books
are usually shelved.
These books may not be taken
from the library. As last year, the
main library will be open from 2 until
9 p.m. on Sunday.
Regular Hours Given
Throughout the school year the
General library will be open from
7:45 a.m. till 10 p.m. on week-days.
Libraries open from 7:45 till noon, 1
till 6 p.m. and 7 till 10 p.m., and
closed on Sundays are the Angell Hall
study hall, the basement study hall
and the Graduate reading rooms.
Open from 8 a.m. till noon, 1 till 5
p.m. and 7 till 10 p.m. on Monday
through Thursday; from 8 a.m. till
,noon and 1 till 5 p.m. on Friday and
8 a.m. till noon on Saturday are the
Architectural library, the Chemistry
library, the East Engineering library,
Engineering library and Science li-
brary. The Business Administration
library will remain open from 8 a.m.
till noon,1 till 6 p.m. and 7 till 10
p.m. on Monday - through Friday, 8
a.m. till noon and 1 till 6 p.m. on
Saturday and from 2 till 5 p.m. on
Sunday.
Other Schedules Given<
Eight till 11:30 a.m. and 2 till
5:30 p.m. on Monday through Friday
and 8 a.m. till 12:30 p.m. on Satur-
day will be the schedule maintained1
by the Dentistry library, while the
Hospital library will stay open from
8 a.m. till noon, from 1:30 till 5 p.m.
on Monday through Friday and from
8 a.m. till noon on Saturday. The
Economics and Mathematics library
will remain open from 8 a.m. till
noon, 1 till 6 p.m. and 7 till 10 p.m.
on week-days; the Observatory li
brary will be open from 2 till 5 pm..
on Monday through Friday.
NEW LEAGUE HOUSE
The Theta Phi Alpha sorority
house, 821 East University Ave., will
be used this year as a freshmanj
league house. The Theta Phi Alpha1
sorority will no longer use the house
because of lack of membership, butf
is expected to continue as an organi-
zation on campus.

New Carillon Bells
Will Soon Resound
Over Local Region
Rising ten stories above the ground,
the new Burton Memorial Tower has
come to constitute the most widely
visible landmark in Ann Arbor.
Recently the poured concrete, of
which the framework of the tower
has been constructed, was painted in
preparation for the veneer finish and
bell hanging in the carillon.
The bells, 53 in number, arrived last
week in Ann Arbor from Loughbor-
ough, England, location of the foun-
dry which cast them. It is expected
that they will shortly take their
places in the airy bell-chamber atop
the tower.
Foremost as to size among tuned,
bells in this country will be the
Charles A. Baird Bell, which Prof.
Earl V. Moore of the School of Music
lauded as the "most perfect ever
cast." Its weight of 12 tons will be
supported by a steel framework in
the bell-chamber.
As carillonneur the University early
in August engaged Wilmot F. Pratt,
formerly the carillon player at St.
Thomas Church in New York City.
He has studied at the world-famous
carillon school in Malines, Belgium.
Fire Sweeps Ruins
After Explosion
(Continued from Page 1)
first to have caused the explosion,
were intact.
Don Beveridge, brother of the pro-
prictor, said the explosion apparently
was caused by the bursting of a steam
boiler used for tire vulcanizing. The'
blast, he said, shattered electric re-
frigerators, carried in stock, releas-
ing explosive fumes, and broke drums
of oil, contributing to the havoc.
The loss was estimated at $60,000 to
$75,000.
The injured, who are in hospitals,
include Leo Graff, 25, employed in
the tire retreading department,
burned severely; Herbert F. Einlack,
36, manager of the company's Sag-
inaw Street store, fractured left'
shoulder; Miss Pauline Sopko, 23,
secretary in the shop, hand mutilated
and Raymond Olson, 39, Evanston,
Ill., salesman who had stopped at the
service station.
La Ven Clark, a passerby, likened
the explosion to an "eruption."
SOCIALIST SLATE READY
DETROIT, Sept. 28.-OP)-The So-
cialist Party slate for the Nov. 3 elec-
tion, announced today by Francis
King, executive chairman, is headed
by John C.° Monarch, Battle Creek,
candidate for Governor, and Roy E.
Matthews, Vermontville, for United
States Senator.

Warner, Read
In Stiff Battle
For Treasurer
Vandenburg Scores New
Deal At Pre-Convention
Banquet Meeting
(Continued from Pace 1)
incumbent. The fight seems at pres-
ent to be between Howard M. Warner,
mayor of Farmington and son of the
late Governor Fred M. Warner, and
Lieut.-Gov. Thomas Read, who it is
rumored, is favored by Governor
Fitzgerald in order to stop any
breach in the ranks which might
arise from Read's defeat for renom-
ination by Luren D. Dickinson.

Dozen Wild dStreams
Cause Texas Floods
(Continued hrmPagel1)
toward confluence with the Brazos,
braced for an overflow.
John D. Rogers, director of the
Brazos River conservation and rec-
lamation district at Navasota, ex-
pressed concern for that area. Hel
said the 1921 flood, which claimed
224 lives in central Texas, rushed
down the Little River and lower Bra-
zos only, while the present menace
is coming down the main stream of
the upper Brazos.I
The Little River rose steadily.
Hundreds of families in Brown and
McCulloch Counties who had re-
turned to flood-scarred homes for re-
habilitation work, fled in terror again
today when the Colorado threatened
an encore of the disastrous rise of
10 days ago.

Mrs. Page Leads Patty
Berg In Women's Golf
SUMMIT, N. J., Sept. 28.-P)
Posting a course record-breaking 79.
Mrs. Estelle Lawson Page of Greens-
boro, N.C., won the medal in today's
18-hole qualifying round of the 40th
U. S. Women's Golf championship.
Mrs. Page, former north and south
Schampion and a comparativernew j
comer sinece she played her first full
round only four years ago, clipped
two strokes off the former record for
the Canoe Brook Country Club
course.
She captured the medal by a two-
stroke margin over Patty Berg

U I

Do YouKOW-

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As far as the rest of the conven- At Winchell, 19 miles south of
tion goes, delegates will have little Brownwood, the Colorado surged up-
more to do than to whoop up and wards at the rate of a foot an hour
cheer for the completed Republican and reached a stage of 57-feet-rec-
state. Although a possible fight for ord of the previous flood.
the attorney-general nomination is At Rockwood, in Coleman County,
forseen with supporters of Burney l where crops were ruined a week ago,
E. Brower, Jackson lawyer, attempt-) the river started receding after at-
ing to oust incumbent David H. Crow- I taining a 70-foot stage.

SMARTEST
HOSIERY SHOPPE
300-A South State
Join our Hosiery Club - 13
your Lucky Number.
Lost semester Club Cards
are still good.
POPULAR FALL SHADES
6b9c -97c

ley,,a regent of the University. Since
Fitzgerald favors Crowley and many
if not most of the delegates are in
some way on the state payroll, it is
doubtful whether Brower can suc-
ceed.
Otherwise the slate will probably
look like this: for secretary of state,
Orville E. Atwood; for auditor gen-
eral, John O'Hara; for Supreme
Court justice, Harry S. Toy; for su-
perintendent of public instruction,
Dr. Eugene B. Elliot. All of these
men are incumbents.
Senator Vandenberg told the dele-
gates tonight that "the people de-
mand a continuation of a sane bud-
get-balancing government at Lansing
and the restoration of a solvent con-
stitutionalism at Washington. We are
still a sovereign people," he asserted,
"and we will choose our own gov-
ernor despite an imperial mandate
from the throne.
S DR UGS

G _

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Students and Faculty -
Those of you who were here last year MILLER'S
welcomes back. The newcomers MILLER'S welcomes
to come in and get acquainted with our new and
improved Sundaes and Sodas - also our Extra Large
Thick, Cold and Creamy Malted Milks.

a
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UMiller'sDairy Farm Stores
1219 So. University 620 E. Liberty 533 So. Main

' .

That Goodyear s
COLLEGE SHOP
has Clothes just
made for the Petite
Co-ed ?
That sizes 9's to 16's are here and just
longing to be tried on?
That we can tell you what to wear and
when?
That here you can make that allow-
ance go a long, long ways?
That the College Shop is the shop for
charming, young apparel?
Here's What You'll
Wear on the Campus:
CULOTTES . . . of heavy woolens
and plaids ... made to look like
skirts ............ $3.95 to $7.95
SEPARATE SKIRTS . . . in the
"swing" or "straight 'n' narrow"
silhouettes ........$3.95 to $9.50
SINGLE SLIP-ONS featuring
the newest trickiest necklines, gay
football colors . ... $2.95 to $7.95
Twin Sets......$5.00 and $5.95
CLASSIC KNITS . . . simple two-
piece dresses of soft angora yarns
in dusty fall shades..........
.............$12.95 and $14.95
TAILORED WOOLS. . . extra good-
looking styles, one- and two-piece
.gay "under-coat" colors...
.~$7.95 to $19.95
TURF COATS.. . on. genuine Ken-
wood cloth, a hairy fabric in lus-
cious shades and warm as a fur
coat; hats to match.........
................$19.50 to $29.50
3-PC. SUITS . . . tailored of heavy
woolens, ideal for all winter wear
..some fur trimmed.......
.. $35.00 to $49.50
TOPCOATS.. . beautifully tailored
down to the last notch . . . long-
wearing linings and inter-lined.
..$18.00
MATCHING SUITS . . . 2 pc. in
colors that perfectly match or
contrast with the topcoats $18.00
ENGLISH WALKING HATS ... of
green, brown, or black velours
with snap brims ..........$5.00
FELT BERETS . .. Mary of Scot-
land types with long quills and
off-face styles with ribbon
streamers................$3.95
SEPARATE JACKETS . . . of im-
ported English tweeds .... $9.50
Tailored suedes in penny-rust
and brown ............... $5.95

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KODAKS

CALKINS -FECE'
School Opening Values
featuring real bargains in every department. Come in and
let us show you how to save on: Drugs, Kodaks, Photo-
graphic Supplies, Pipes;Tobaccos, Cigarettes. Take advan-
tage of our Fountain Service. We have complete stocks.
Always interested and efficient service.
SPECIALS,

on=&=

®®

YOU CAN ALWAYS DEPEND UPON MAYFAIR QUALITY

Nationally Famous CloCks

GUARANTEED
FIRST QUALITY
FULL FASHIONED
PURE SILK CHIFFON
49c pair

-
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- -

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/,

All are fine timekeepers.

They are as

dependable as they are good looking.
Many styles, shapes and colors from
which to choose.
98c and up

Your best companion ...
A Jiffy Kodak
The model illustrated is Eastman's Jiffy Kodak.
It's convenient to use and carry.
Allyours for 00
We do expert photofinishing in our own dark-
rooms. This is a business with us - not a side-
line.

11

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SKI RTS

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ors

j KoTEX

For Success at
Dates and
Dances:
AFTERNOON FROCKS..
a type for every figure . .
the tunic (lampshade or
just slightly flared) . . .
the princes (with plenty
of flare, and loads of
buttons) . . . the Direc-
toire (accentuated high
bustlines, graceful skirts)
. . all in colors and
plenty of very smart
black! .. $12.95 to $22.75
DINNER AND EVENING
. glamour for you after
dark in rustling taffeta
. old-fashioned moires
and damasks ... sophis-
ticated satins and velvets
. . . gleaming lames of
chiffon lightness.. . dull
crepes that carry a world
of charm. The shades,
just right for blondes,
brunettes, or titians!
.....$14.95 to $22.75
WRAPS or CAPES. . .both
are good this fall . . . .
lengths from finger-tip
to the floor . . . in velvet
shirred, padded, tucked,
or plain . .$12.95 to 28.50
ACCESSORIES... jewels,
bags, hankies, shoes and
hose are here for the
choosing. (Tailored ac-
cessories for your street

l'

100% WOOL
SWEATERS
Pullovers and Twins . . . in
green, mist, brown, black
and navy.
$198 $298

in newest fall shades. They
add the right note to your
costume.
$198 to $398

Don't Be
That Way!

Can't
Chafe-
Can't Fail
-Can't Show
______ 19C
Wonderform
KOTEX BELT
Pinless, narrow, self-
balancing. Easy to
+ adjust. Gives extra
comfort and 1
safety.

You'll have no trouble with our pens. All
leading makes, including Parkers, Sheaffer's
and Conklin.

I Im.m 0

Q UE S T
The positive deodor-

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