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November 01, 1936 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UNAY, NOV. 11936 TIlE MICHIGAN I)AILYSA____

!'AGE SEVEN

Minnesota Falls Before Savage Wildeats,6-0

IIII I r i

Gopher Fumble
Paves Way For
Score By Toth
An Impregnable Defense
Halts Last Minute Rally
And Unbeaten Record
Purple Is Unbeaten
Combination Of Mud, Rain
And Slippery Ball Stops
Any Further Scoring
EVANSTON, Ill., Oct. 31.-/P)--
The supposedly impregnable citade]
of Minnesota's football power fell
today before the furious charge of
Northwestern's Wildcats, carrying
with it the demolishment of the
game's most celebrated winning
streak and the 1936 championship
dreams of the Galloping Gophers.
Taking advantage of a sequence of
extraordinary "breaks," Northwest-
ern pushed over a last period touch-
down to beat Minnesota, 6 to 0, in a
battle that was savegly fought in the
mud and rain before a shrieking
crowd of 47,000 spectators in Dyche
stadium.
Widseth Draws Penalty
A penalty for slugging by big Ed
Widseth, star tackle and cocaptain of
the Minnesotans, followed the re-
covery of a Gopher fumble on the
visitors' 13 yard line and paved the
way for Steve Toth, Northwestern
fullback from Toledo, Ohio, to plou'gh
across for the winning score on the
second play of the final quarter.
"Widseth, in the pileup of a line
,play, hit an opposing player twice in
the face, after the whistle blew," said
referee John Getchell, of St. Thomas,
after the game.
The offense called for a 15 yard
penalty but since the Wildcats had
the ball only 13 yards from the goal
line, the actual penalty amounted to
12 yards and left the home team with
four chances to put the ball across
from the one yard stripe.-
Minnesotahtwice thrust back line
plunges, with Don Geyer and Toth
carrying/the ball, before and after
the teams changed sides of the field
for the final quarter. Toth, on 'the
third play of the series and second
play, of the last quarter, plunged
across his own right tackle for the
touchdown.
Toth's Place-Kick Blocked
Toth's attempt to placekick the
extra point was blocked by Antil,
Gopher end, but the mudacked Wild-
cats took the six points that the
"breaks" had aided them in collect-
ing and then proceeded to fight off
Minnesota's most furious counter
charges throughout the last period.
The Gophers went down with col-
ors flying, throwing all their vaunted
manpower into the game in their
furious efforts to turn the tide, but
they were stopped by a combination
of the mud, the rain, their own loose
handling of the slippery ball, and the
sensational defense of the Wildcats.
The defeat brought a dramatic fin-
ish to the Minnesota winning streak,
which had extended through 21 suc-
cessive games, perched the Gophers
on top of the football world, and made
the system taught by Bernie Bierman
the standard by which gridiron pro-
duction was measured.
Saw 28 Without Defeat
The mighty men of Minnesota,
under Bierman's shrewd tutoring, had
gone through 28 consecutive matches
without defeat. Just a week ago, in
taking their fourth straight game of
the current campaign /from Purdue

by a 33-0 margin, they were hailed as
another invincible machine, headed
for national championship heights.
Minnesota's first setback since the
Gophers lost to Michigan in the final
game of the 1932 season not only
rocked the entire American football
world but gave Northwestern com-
mand of the Big Ten championship
race. The Wildcats also entered the
game unbeaten and their triumph.
stirred a rain soaked crowd of par-
tisan rooters to wild heights of cele-
bration.

Andy Uram 's 48-Yard Run Proves Futile For Gophers

TotsYou c r~ta illy should know
that it isn't cricket
To go without your
Formal ticket.
It's money well spent,
It's a big event.
UNI4ON FORMAL
Novemnbcr the 6th $2.50 a BID

a

I

d- '

1

-- Associated Press Photo
Rushed to The Daily last night, this picture taken yesterday afternoon at Dyche Stadium in Evanston, Ill., shows Andy Uram, Minnesota half-
back as he got away on a 48-yard run in the first period of the game which saw the Northwestern Wildcats topple the Golden Gopher from the
undefeated throne which they have occupied in their last 21 tilts. Also shown in the picture are Vanzo, number 19, quarterback; Gibson, number
54, tackle; and Reid, number 44, guard, all of Northwestern. Midler, number 30, is a Minnesota tackle.

Carnegie Tech Statistics Show wolverines
Edged Out By Have Strong Passing -A
P -.* .. Q

tttacki

Hawkeyes Bow
before Indiana
O 1 9 136

I 1u I l1Iutu' 6-LOLINEUPS .-

Cecil Isbell Place-Kicks
All Important Point For
HairlineVictory
PITTSBURGH, Oc L. 31.-(A)-Pur-
due's husky Boilermakers made a dis-
play of their power for three scoreless
periods today, then barely edged past
Carnegie Tech, 7-to 6 in a spectacular
final quarter.
The two teams had battled for 50
odd minutes, cautiously at first, then
stubbornly, and at lastdwearily. An-
thony Ippolito, a Purdue sophomore
substitute, plunged through center
for the touchdown after a 50-yard
sustained attack by Purdue. Cecil
Isbell place-kicked the all important
point.
Carnegie Tech's desperate drive in
the closing minutes of the game
caused the value of that boot to soar.
The Tartans obtained the ball in mid-
field on a punt which Manuel Za-
wacki returned seven yards. Sud-
denly Carnegie's plays all became the
right plays. A pass was completed
in the end zone, but called back and
Carnegie penalized five yards. Un-
daunted another pass, Fouse to Za-
wacki, was called-and scored.
The crowd of 20,000 waited anxious-
ly as timeout was taken for both
teams to send in substitutes. Then
Coleman Kopcsak tried a placement
for the extra point and saw it go wide
of the posts.
Fordham Ties Pitt
To Stay Unbeaten
NEW YORK, Oct. 31.-(k)-Pitts-
burgh's mighty juggernaut puffed
and puffed all over the Polo grounds
today, but it couldn't oust the Ford-
ham Rams from the list ofhthe na-
tion's undefeated football teams.
The best the Conquerors of Notre l
Dame could get was an 0-0 draw.ItI
was the second consecutive year in,
which the two teams have battled to a
scoreless deadlock.
A capacity crowd of 57,000-a com-
plete sell-out-watched the game,
The only real scoring threat of the
afternoon was furnished by the Pan-
thers. Late in the third quarter they
launched a 46-yard march that car-
ried from mid-field to the Fordham.
four-yard marker.
But as the hundreds of Pitt sup-
porters in the big crowd yelled for
a touchdown, the Fordham line stif-
fened, twice stopped Larue in his
tracks and Pitt's one good opportunity
went a-glimmering.

Illinois pos.
Sell LE
Berner LT
Fay L '
Sayre (C) C
Kuhn R3
Skarda RT
Castelo RE
Strong Q3
Mazeika LH
Wardley RH
Wilson FB
Score by periods:
Illinois ...........0
Michigan.........0
Illinois scoring:
Kuhn. Goal from
(placekick).
Michigan scoring:
Sweet.

Michigan
Patanelli (C)
Siegel
Garber
Rinaldi
Vandewater
Luby
Smick
Barclay
Ritchie
Smithers'
Sweet
9 0 0-9
0 0 6-6
Touchdown -
field - Strong
Touchdown-

Cole, Henry. Ends. Nelson. Tackles, nsad IL
Morris, Lasater. Guards, Heaphy.
Michigan subs: Backs, Levine,BLOIG Nndct31
Hook, Farmer. End, Gedeon. Tackles, BLOOMINGTON, d., Oct. 31-
Pacquette, Lincoln. Guards, Mar- ()-Oze Simmons, Iowa's brilliant
zonie, Brennan, Ziem. Center, J. Jor- Negro fullback, three times led the
dan. Hawkeyes up to football's payoff
Referee-Lyle Clarno (Bradley);'window today before 20,000 persons
umpire-W. D. Knight. (Dartmouth);
field judge-N. E. Kearns (DePaul); in Memorial Stadium but they cashed
head linesman-Jay Wyatt, Missouri. I only one of the tickets and bowed to
SUMMARY I Indiana 13 to 6 in the ninth renewal

Ie
GO* SKI ING
A LANDSLIDE
IN COMFORT AND
SMARTN ESS
AL L-WOOL SK I SUITS
Maybe you can't go to Switzerland but think of the
hills in Ann Arbor that beckon to you folks on skiis.
$6.95 to $14.95
Extra Ski Pants ... $2.95 - $4.45
G EO. J. MO E
SPORT SHOPS
711 North University 902 South Stat

Ill.
Total yards gained .......66
First downs .............. 2
Yards gained rushing.....66
Forward passes attempted 2
Forward passes completed 0
Forward passes intercepted 1
Yards by forward passing 0
Lateral passes attempted 1
Lateral passes completed .. 1
Yards by lateral passes . ... 1

Mich.
237
13
S 99
3 17
8
0
I 138
3
3
0

Illinois subs: Backs, Spurgeon,

Punting average (from scrim-
Smage)... ..34
*Total yards, kicks
returned..............77
Average return of punts .. 3
7Opponents' fumbles recov-
O~e 'H ere , d 2
Over Bd gers Own fumbles recovered 3
Yards lost by penalty...... 5
MADISON, Oct. 31.-4)-The Uni- Number of penalties..... 1
versity of Chicago football team *Includes punts and kickoffs.

31
87
2
0
3
25
3

of their Big Ten gridiron rivalry.
It was Indiana's second Conference
victory against one defeat and the
second defeat in three starts for the
Hawkeyes, who tied Illinois in their
other Big Ten game.
Indiana scored on an intercepted
pass in the second quarter, Roy Eads
taking a wild toss from Frank Bal-
azes and running 38 yards for the first
touchdown and a pint-sized reserve
back, Harry Cherry, was the spear-
head of a 50-yard drive for the sec-
ond touchdown in the third period,
George Fowler bucking it over from
the one yard line in two tries.
Iowa's lone touchdown came late in
the fourth period on a pass from Sim-
mons to his Negro end, Homer Har-
ris, from Indiana's 15-yard line cli-
maxing a four play drive from Iowa's
29. Two previous drives had been
halted two and four yards from the
last white line in the first and fourth
quarters.
The Hoosiers gained 132 yards by
rushing compared to 75 for the Hawk-
eyes.

I

scored a 7 to 6 victory in a home-
coming contest with Wisconsin today,
holding the hapless Badgers in the
cellar of Western Conference stand-
ings. A crowd of 18,700 attended.
William Gillerlain, an end, was
responsible for the Maroons' slender
margin of victory. He booted the
ball between the goal posts in the
first quarter after Warren Skoning,
fullback, made the touchdown. The
Maroons engineered the scoring plays
within three minutes after the game
started when Robert Fitzgerald, an'
end, intercepted a pass thrown by
Clarence Tommerson, Badger half-
back.
Both teams threatened several
times in the second and third quar-
ters. Early in the fourth period a
48 yard run by Tommerson to the
Chicago 9-yard line paved the way
for Wisconsin's score. Roy Bellin,
halfback, broke through the left side
of the Chicago line on second down,
Gillerlain blocked Christianson's at-
tempted place kick for the extra point,
and the Maroons clung to a one point
lead.
5=0
Christmas Folders
and Envelopes
ALL NEW DESIGNS
With Your Name
Imprinted
$100
Special assortment
of the new
EDGAR A. GUEST
CHRISTMAS GREETINGS

Manero, Mate Beat
Argentine Golfers
BUENOS AIRES, Oct. 31.-{P-
Tony Manero, U. S. open champion,
and his golfing travelling mate, John-
ny Revolta of Milwaukee, closed their
South American tour today with a
revenge 4 and 3 exhibition victory
over the prose who beat them in the
Argentine open.
anero finished third and Revolta
ith m the recent Argentine chai-
'pionship, which John Cruikshank
won and in which Juan Martinez
took second.
Manero and Revolta leave for Mi-
ami by plane tomorrow.
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
The Democratic Candidate
FOR
PRDGE I

5

Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classified Ads.

The Judge Should
Know the Law

1N THE EXCITEMENT of a national campaign, we should not
forget that we are to elect county officials whose positions are as
important in their own spheres as that of the President of the
United States.
To elect a judge without legal training is like choosing a health
officer who never attended medical school. This is the principal
reason why those conversant with court conditions - of both parties -
are urging the election of Harold D. Golds as Judge of Probate over
his opponent who has no legal training whatever.
And there are other reasons. Mr. Golds by his unaided efforts has
supported himself since he was eighteen years old; has obtained
eight years of University training; and by study and experience has
acquired an understanding of the human problems of the Court.

HAROLD D. GOLDS, A.B., LL.B.

Those of us who know him intimately (and, by the way this
advertisement is being inserted by Republicans) know him to be
fine and clean and of the highest personal character and character-
istics - a man who can be trusted to act thoughtfully, honestly and
capably in any circumstance.
Mr. Golds is a World War veteran who was wounded three
times while serving in France and an officer of the Marine
Corps Reserve. He has been active in relief work for veterans,
orphans and widows. He has been president of the Ann
Arbor Lawyers Club and is a member of the Executive Council
of the Washtenaw-Livingston Council of the Boy Scouts
of America.
IT IS YOUR CIVIC DUTY TO SEE THAT A MAN WITH LEGAL TRAINING IS ELECTED

I

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