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November 01, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Notre DameUpsetsFavored Ohio State In PouringR
1 'W

in, 7-2

Phi Delts Score Win
Over Traditional Foe
The Phi Delt touch football team
yesterday trimmed the S.A.E.'s 12 to
0 in the annual pre-Homecoming
game between the two fraternities.
It was the first victory in three tries
for the boys from the East side of
Washtenaw, the S.A.E. winning the
previous games 8 to 6 and 32 to 0.
Both counters were made on passes
from Larry Barasa, injured Varsity
gridder, to Dave Hunn. A crowd
of 300 persons saw the game.
;k -7 2 '

Fighting Drive
Ends In Score
SBy McCormick

Won Lost
Northwestern .....4 0
Minnesota ........ 2 1
Indiana ..........2 1
Purdue ..........2 1
Illinois...........1 1
Chicago..........1 1
Ohio State .......1 1
Iowa .............0 2
Wisconsin ........0 2
Michigan ........0 3

Tie
1.000
.666
.666
.666
.500
.500
.500
.000
.000
.000

GRAD GRID

GOSSIP

A week ago I had the, privilege of
weeping on the student body's shoul-
der in an effort to incite them to a
little spirited pride in their Uni-
versity. A lot of people told me I
was just another "Grad Problem,"
but I must say that the problem has
been more or less solved. When I
can see 25,000 Michigan supporters
working themselves into a lather over
a team that is in the trial period
and give them enough courage to
carry on and prove themselves -
then I can cheerfully report to my
colleagues of the Class of '11 on the
state of the University.
It's interesting to note how easy
it is to change the mob psychol-
ogy. Professor Pillsbury has a
fancy name for it in his Psychol-
ogy 31, but back in 1911 when we
studied such minor things as l'aw
and medicine we called it "sucker
switch." It is a peculiar ailment
that is recognized by switching
t from condemning a failing team
to cheering a winning team.-
However this group of people
never do any real thinking for
themselves - they merely follow
the headlines. And didn't those
headlines look great last week.
According to the press, we did
everything from "Hit the Come-
back Trail" to "Establish New
Football Methodology at Michi-
gan." But now that the shifty
press is "agin" us again.
s: * 4*
I was interested to note that the
long hidden Sophomore Class,who
waited for their turns in the line-up
like the second serving group at the
Pretzel Bell, made the most of their
opportunities.nThe young lady who
sputtered behind me at the game
said she now understood the mean-
ing of such phrases as Putting the
Hook to Them, and Knocking Them
to Smitherseens. The same young
lady now in her Sophomore year ex-
claimed "Why didn't somebody tell
me we had a team like this - I'll
have to come more often." You
know the statement that the truth
shall come from the mouth of Babes
- so perhaps we should all entertain
this sentiment.
Our coaching staff can take a
breathing spell and perhaps de-
vote their entire time to the team
now that the alumni letters have
ceased demanding the removal
of everybody from Harry Kipke
on up to President Ruthven for
the failure of the football team.
The outside world thinks enough
of our coaching staff to ask its
members to write articles for na-
tional syndication and to appear
on radio broadcasts. Whether
we approve of that practice or
not it does reveal that responsi-
ble sports men have faith in
our athletic board of strategy
so we should evidence the same
trust.
* * *
There is only one ounce of gall
left in my system over the football
ailments now and that is the atten-
dance at the games. If we have all
the apparent enthusiasm demon-
strated after the game of victory
why aren't we filling the stadium.
The first winning game of the year
looked like the meeting of the The-
osophists Society if we were to
judge by the size of the crowd. The
team has prospered without any
overly great degree of support. Think
what they might have done yesterday
had they your real enthusiasm be-
hind them.

Blocked Punt By Tackle In
Second Quarter Gives
BuckeyesSafety
SOUTH BEND, Ind., Oct. 31.-(f')
-Notre Dame became the raging,
Fighting Irish of tradition for two
minutes today-just long enough to
fashion one touchdown that upset
Ohio State's favored Buckeyes, 7 to 2.
Half of the battle was fought out
in a driving rain. It produced noth-
ing quite like that fourth period a
year ago at Columbus when the in-
spired Irish staged one of the most
spectacular of football comebacks to
conquer a great Ohio eleven 18 to 13.
But, there were thrills enough to
keep a near-capacity crowd of 55,000
soaked spectators on edge.
With John Bettridge, Jim McDon-
ald and Mike Kabealo ripping off
sizeable gains, the Buckeyes reached
the Irish three-yard line in the sec-
ond period.
Nick Wasylik, replaced Tippy Dye
and threw a pass but Joe Gleason,
six foot right halfback, intercepted
it on Notre Dame's one yard line.
Jack McCarthy, sophomore half-
back, dropped back deep into his end
zone to punt, but as the ball left his
foot, 243-pound Charley Hamrick,
Ohio's left tackle, blocked it for an
automatic safety.
Arising to inspired heights in the
last two minutes of the first half,
the Irish started driving and never
stopped until Nevin (Bunny) McCor-
mick, slender junior fullback, from
Livermore, Calif., crashed the last
three yards over the Buckeyes' right
guard for a touchdown. Danbom
place-kicked the point.
Illinois Profits
By Breaks, Nips
Wolverines, 9-6
(Continued from Page 1)
their receiver on their only attempts.
Seven of the Wolverines' 13 first
downs resulted from passing. The Il-
lini totaled but two first downs, both
by rushing.
Coach Zuppke's eleven recovered
two of Michigan's five fumbles and all
of the three made by Illinois backs.
Sweet was outpunted by Strong, hav-
ing an average of 31 yards per attempt
to 34 for his opponent.
Siegel, huge sophomore tackle, con-
tinued the good work he turned in
last week by continually harrassing
the Illinois offense on all parts of the
field, besides blocking the punt that
finally resulted in Michigan's only
score.
Captain Patanelli again played his
usual excellent game at end, backing
up every play and smashing down
anything thatcame his way. Sweet
from behind the line also was a pow-
er on defense for the Varsity.
On offense it was Ritchie and
Smithers who shared the honors for
Michigan. Smithers drove through
for several good gains and kept the
Illini backs on their toes with his
passes, while Ritchie was threatening
to break away all afternoon.
Hook failed to gain the yardage he
picked up against Columbia when he
relieved Ritchie yesterday, but his
one perfect heave to Captain Patan-
elli showed that hemay become a
passing threat. Smick, Elmer Ged-
eon, Patanelli and Barclay proved
themselves excellent Bass receivers
when the opportunities presented
themselves.
Yesterday's game was the fourth
contest in four years between the two
teams to be decided by a place kick.
In 1933 and 1934' Michigan and Il-
linois split on 7-6. decisions, while
last year the Indians won, 3 to 0.

SCORES
BIG TEN
Purdue 7, Carnegie Tech 6.
Notre Dame 7, Ohio State 2.
Chicago 7, Wisconsin 6.
Northwestern 6, Minnesota 0.
Indiana 13, Iowa 6.
Illinois 9, Michigan 6.
STATE
Central Teachers 44, St. Marys 9.
Kalamazoo 7, Albion 7 (tie).
Michigan State Normal 7, Val-{
paraiso 6.
Morningside 7, Wayne Teachers 0.
Hillsdale 13, Olivet 0.
Alma 7, Hope 6.
Ironwood Junior 7, Northern
State Teachers 0.
Adrian 24, Lawrence Tech 6.
Grand Rapids Junior College 21,
Detroit Tech 6.
Ferris Institute 0, Assumption 33.
Michigan Mining Tech 7, North-
land 6.
Wayne 9, Toledo 6.
EAST
Boston College 13, Michigan State
13 (tie)
Brown 38, Tufts 7.
Bucknell 6, Villanova 0.
Columbia 20, Cornell 13.
Fordham 0, Pittsburgh 0 (tie).
Georgetown U. 47, Shenandoah 0.
Harvard 14, Princeton 14 (tie).
Lehigh 19, Rutgers 0.
Maine 14, Colby 7.
Manhattan 28, C.C.N.Y. 7.
Amherst 13, Mass. State 7.
New York U. 46, Lafayette 0.
Pennsylvania 16, Navy 6.
Penn State 18, Syracuse 0.
Temple 3, Holy Cross 0.
Williams 26, Union 13.
Colgate 14, Army 7.
Dartmouth 11, Yale 7.
Hamilton 6, Swathmore 0.
MID-WEST
Nebraska 20, Missouri 0.
Oklahoma 7, Iowa State 7 (tie).
Arizona 0, Kansas 0 (tie).
Wash. U. (St. Louis) 39, Okla-
homa A. & M. 6.
Oberlin 14, Kenyon 7.
Butler 64, Franklin 0.
DePauw 0, Ball State 0 (tie).
North Dakota 14, North Dakota
State 0.
DePaill 19, Western State (Mich.)
7.
South Dakota 6, South Dakota
State 0.
Ohio Wesleyan 13, Miami (O.) 0.
Wittenberg 9, Denison 7.
Baldwin-Wallace 13, Case 12.
Western Reserve 19, Dayton 7.
Bowling Green 13, Hiram 0.
Ohio U. 10, Cincinnati 7.
Capital 13, Heidelberg 12.
Akron 33, John Carroll 7.
Centre 26, Xavier (O.) 12.
SOUTH
Tennessee 46, Georgia 0.
Mississippi State 68, Sewane 0.
Louisiana State 19, Vanderbilt 0.
Clemson 14, Georgia Tech 13.
Alabama 14, Kentucky 0.
Florida 7, Maryland 6.
Tulane 22, Louisiana Tech 13.
Virginia Military 12, Virginia 6.
Virginia Poly 20, Richmond 7.
Mississippi 24, Centenary 7.
Hampden-Sydney 19, William &
Mary 0.
NorthtCarolina 21, North Carolina
State 6.
Duke 51, Wash. & Lee 0.
SOUTH WEST
Tulsa 10, Kansas State 7.
Southern Methodist 14, Texas 7.
Arkansas 18, Texas A. & M. 0.
Texas Christian 28, Baylor 0.
Rice 12, George Wash. 6.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Utah 18, Brigham Young 0.
Utah State 0, Denver 0
Wyoming 27, Colorado Mines 0.
Colorado U. 7, Colorado College 0.
FAR WEST
Washington State 14, California
13.

Stanford 19, U.C.L.A. 6.
Washington 7, Oregon 0.
Santa Clara 12, Auburn 0.
Oregon State 14, Montana 7.
Idaho 18, Gonzaga 7.
Santa Barbara 13, Nevada 0.

BostonCollege Gains Tie
BOSTON. Mass., Oct. 31.--!')- ney place-kicked the extra point.
Staging a 91-yard march early in the The Eagles' second touchdown re-I
final period, the Boston College sulted from a series of aerial and
Eagles punched across a touchdown ground mianeuvers, Ira Jivelekian.
and converted the extra point to tie passed twice to Atilo Ferdenzi and
the famed Spartans of Michigan once to Bill Flynn for substantial
gains. Jivelekian swept the Spartan
State, 13-13, in a spectacular game left flank for three yards to score.
played before 10,000 persons at Fen- Gil Dobie immediately sent in Gin-
way Park today. toff for Jivelekian and the former tied
The Eagles opened the scoring in the score with his placement kick.
the first quarter with Fella Gintoff ,Later in the same stanza after an
passing to Tom Guinea for 23 yards intercepted pass, Gintoff attempted a
and the score. Gintoff missed the field goal from the State 9-yard line,
try for the extra point. but the kick failed.
In the second period, a long pass, .Last year the Eagles scored a stun-
Jack Pingel to Milton Lehnhardt, re- ning upset by downing the Western-
sulted in State's first touchdown. ers 18-6, and today's result was al-
With the ball on Boston's 43, Pingel most as unexpected..
tossed to Lehnhardt on the 25 and Early in the first quarter, it became
the latter scooted over for the score. evident that two entirely different
Haney failed to convert. styles of play were in use. Boston was
Later in the same stanza, Pingel's depending on sheer power but failed
passes to Nelson and Kutchins and
an interference ruling on one forwardP
set the visitors on the Maroon and 1N ' N
Gold nine yard line. LOW RATES - FINE WORK
Thre lie paysby Pnge mae ,Dial 2-1013 . . 308 North Main Street
Three line plays by Pingel made DowntownNorth of Main Post Office
eight yards and on fourth down, a The ATHENS PRESS
trick pass, Pingel to Haney gave the, SEE US FIRST
Spartans their final touchdown. Ha-R

with Spartans
to make its downs. Three punt ex-
,hanges drove the Spartans backi
to their own 10.

The so-called Varsity went into Spartans held for downs on their own
the backfield for State in the thiy'd 12 and took the ball inside the Boston
pei iod. Steve Sebo saved a touch- 10-yard line before they lost the ball
down when he tackled Jivelekian when a fourth down pass was ground-
from behind on the State 18. l The ed.

PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 31. - (M )-
The Pennsylvania juggernaut pulled
,long at full force today, gained an
early edge on Navy and swept
through the Sailor defenses for a 16
to 6 triumph

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V VOTE STRAIGHT DEMOCRATIC
For Business-Like Administration

f

of Public
Washtenaw

Offices
1 Coun1

Vote For

the

Candidates

On The Democratic Ticket
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
Second District

D CH ARLES E. DOWNING
STATE SENATOR REGISTER OF DTE1D3
Twelfth District
]JOHN D. cGILLIS
CIRCUIT COURT COMMISSIONER
presentative R In
STATE LEGISLATU,E
CIRCUIT COURT COMMISSIONER
JUDGE OF PROBATE JOSEPH ZWER DLING
E7 H AROL DD.GOL DS
DRAIN COMMISSIONER
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
CORONER
SHERIFF
WARD W. M AR TIN
E] EZRA TISCH
COUNTY CTAE.K CORONER
COUNTY TMASTEN COAR NTY UVEY U
COUNTY TREASURER COUNTY SURVEYOR
JANE FORSH E El . PAU L BUCKLEY

I. 1

It is only natural
that clean, healthy,
contented cows pro-
duce better milk.

I Father Time
Says:
"'Vote
Democratic"

TI E

TO

RETIRE

You

Serve

the Best
u. Serve

The .oll Call for our present list of County Office holders reads like a series of
Life Sentences.
The Probate Judge has been in office for TWELVE YEARS!
The Prosecuting -Attorney has been in office for SIX YEARS!
The two Circuit Court Commissioners have been in office.for.EN YEARS!
The Sheriff has been In office for SIX YEARS!
The Coroner has been in office so long the oldest county resident CANNOT
RECALL when he was first elected!
Our County Offices were never intended under our American system of govern-
inent to represent life terms.
New Blood is needed for the proper and effective administration of County
Government.
The candidates presented to you by the Democratic Party are of a calibre which
guarantees to you the honest and efficient administration of your government.
In the interest of the American idea of fair-play and the encouragement of capable

When YoI

II Dhu Varren Jersey, II

t II I

I

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