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October 27, 1936 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-27

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The Weather

C, r

l~ir iga
414tr

~IaitP

Editorials
Angelo lHerndon..
Sweet Sleep ...

Mostly fair today; continued
low temperature.

VOL. XLVII No. 26 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCT 27, 1936

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Rebels Ready
For Desperate
Madrid Drive
Dispatches Declare City
Is Isolated; Campaign
Of Terror Conducted
Loyalists Staging
'Last Ditch' Defense
All Able-Bodied Members
Help Protect Outskirts
Of BeseigedCity
ON MADRID BATTLEFRONT,,
Oct. 26.-Fascist besiegers of Madrid
fingered their rifles tonight, waiting
for the "zero hour" which many in-
surgent leaders said might come
Tuesday morning.
'Dispatches to Lisbon, Portugal, said
the Insurgent high command an-~
nounced that isolated Madrid would
be taken "within three to 10 days."
Furthering their campaign to ter-
rify the inhabitants of Madrid into
surrender, Fascist aviators today,
again bombed and strafed the sub-
urbs of the capital. Several small
bombs were dropped on Barajas air-
port, causing light damage.
Fire On Plane
Crews of government anti-aircraft;
batteries blasted away at the diving
planes but did not bring any down.
Leisurely, the insurgent airmenl
circled Madrid, then soared away
without encountering a single govern-.
ment warplane.
The wearied defenders of Madridt
tonight fervently pleaded with their
fighting forces to mass into a "hu-
man avalanche" against the invaders
Urgently they demanded swift
counter attacks on the Fascist ad-t
vance units to prevent fratricidal'
blood from spilling into the gutters
of sunny Madrid.
The capital was emptied of all able-1
bodied men and youths as the gov-
ernment defenders sought to force a1
battle on the outskirts of the city
rather than wait until the attackers
should gain he city's gates.
A communique issued by the FascistI
Government at Burgos exultantly de-I
clared that rail communication froml
Madrid was severed at El Escorial,
northwest of the capital, and at Ar-E
anjuez, to the southwest.f
Roar Of Cannon Heard
Aranjuez, variously reported cap-
tured and recaptured on several oc-
casions by the opposing high com-
mands, is a strategic rail center givingE
the capital vital access to eastern
coastal cities such as Barcelona and
Valencia.
The roar of cannon could be heard
plainly in Madrid, but the populace,t
accustomed to a week of this seemed1
unconcerned and strolled about as ifE
there were nothing more ominous
sounding than a fire-cracker celebra-
tion,
Barbara Heathr
Named To Headt
Soph CabaretI
Barbara Heath, was chosen generalt
chairman of the Sophomore Cabaret,
to be held Dec. 4 and 5, it was an-
nounced last night at the Panhellenic
Banquet by Charlotte D. R'ueger, '37,
League president. Betty Lyon wasc
appointed assistant chairman.
Miss Heath, a member of Pi Beta

Phi sorority, is on the League social,
committee and last year was in chargej
of dancing for the Freshman Fiesta.
Miss Lyon also participated in the
year project. She is a member of1
the theatre-arts committee of the
League and works on The Daily busi-
ness staff. She is affiliated withi
Alpha Phi.c
Nine sophomore women were also
appointed to fill the various chair-c
manships on the central committeek
for the affair. Betty Shaffer, al
member of Kappa Alpha Theta, is
hostess chairman, and Myrra Short t
heads the finance committee. Laura-
belle Godlove, affiliated with Alpha
Gamma Delta, will have charge of
the, music and Dorothea Staebler is1
publicity chairman. Miss Staebler is{
a member of Alpha Chi Omega. 1
Charlotte Poock, of Delta Gamma.
will head the entertainment commit -
tee, and Mary Wheat, affiliated with
Collegiate Sorosis, will be in charge'
of programs. Janet Fullenwider, a
member of Kappa Alpha Theta, is'
ticket chairman. Eleanor Skiles, of
Collegiate Sorosis, is head of the cos-'

Daily Analysis Shows Literary Digest
Straw Presidential Vote Is Inaccurate

(.9).-

The Literary Digest Presidential
straw vote is misleading, according
to a mathematical analysis conducted
by The Daily, which indicated yester-
day that President Roosevelt will de-
feat Governor Landon by 374 elec-
toral votes to 184.
The reason that the Digest returns
are incorrect is that more 1932 Re-
publicans have voted in the poll than
1932 Democrats. To show a true
cross-section of the voters, the Di-
gest would have polled more 1932
Democrats. There were more of
them.
It is not a question of what these
people normally voted. The point is
that in 1932 the majority of the
country voted for Roosevelt, and the
Digest, in its columns indicating the
1932 vote of the polls, should show
that.
Method Explained
The method used by The Daily in
this analysis is very simple. It is
merely to determine in each state, on
the basis of the Digest's own figures,
by what percentage Landon is run-
ning ahead or behind Hoover's 1932
vote, and by what percentage Roose-
velt is running ahead or behind his
own 1932 vote;
Take, for example, the small state
of Nevada to make the analysis
simple. Figures of the Digest Poll
to date show Landon leading by 972
straw votes to 927.
Rectified, the figures show Roose-
velt polling an estimated 27,317 pop-
ular votes on Nov. 3, Landon, 15,208.
The procedure is this :
Add the Nevada Digest figures of
those 1932 Republicans who will vote
for Landon; those 1932 Republicans
who will vote for Roosevelt and those
1932 Republicans who will vote for
Lemke This addition gives the total
of the 1932 Republicans polled by
the Digest.
Divide this figure into the total
1936 Nevada vote for Landon shown
by the Digest. This gives the per-'
centage by which Landon is running
behind or ahead of Hoover.
Accurate In Past
Multiply the actual Hoover pop-
ular vote in Nevada of 1932 by this
percentage. This gives a correct esti-
mate of what Landon will poll in
Nevada in 1936.
In Nevada, the Digest has polled
643 Republicans of 1932 who will vote
for Landon, 158 Republicans of 1932,
who will vote for Roosevelt and 9
Republicans who will vote for Lemke.
Added together this shows that the
Digest has polled 810 Republicans of
1932 in Nevada this year. This figure,
divided into the total straw votes
cast in Nevada for Landon shows
that he is polling 120 per cent of what
Hoover polled. Multiplying the ac-
tual Hoover vote for 1932, or 12,647,
by 120 per cent, one has an estimated
1936 popular vote for Governor Lan-
don of 15,208.{
By applying the same method to
the Democratic figures, one gets an
estimated 1936 popular vote for
Roosevelt of 27,317 in Nevada. This
is no personal opinion. It is just
mathematical truth.
The Digest Poll has always up to
this year predicted the national elec-
tion with great accuracy. In 1932 it
predicted the landslide of President
Roosevelt and in 1932 the landslide of1
President Hoover. However, by the
method shown above, The Daily de-,
termined that Roosevelt will win with
347 electoral votes to 184, for Landon,,
instead of the Kansan capturing a'
victory of 374 electoral votes to Roose-
velt's 157, as the Digest poll has in-
dicated to date.
More Republican Ballots
The poll has not been correct this
year because more Republican bal-
lots have been received than Demo-
cratic. The semi-final tabulations
show that 983,971 Republicans have
been polled, and only 926,912 Demo-
crats.
It must be pointed out that fig-
ures from big Democratic cities are 1

Predictions Based On Corrected
Literary Digest Poll

Estimated
Popular Vote

State

Alabama............
Arizona.............
Arkansas .............
California ............
Colorado..............
Connecticut ..........
Delaware .............
Florida ...............
Georgia ..............
Idaho...............
Illinois..............
Indiana.............
Iowa .................
Kansas ...............
Kentucky .............
Louisiana .............
M aine ................
Maryland .............
Massachusetts........
Michigan............
M inn . ...............
Mississippi ............
Missouri ..............
Montana-............
Nebraska .............
Nevada ...............
New Hampshire......
New Jersey ............
New Mexico ..........
New York ..............
North Carolina ........
North Dakota .........
Ohio .................:
Oklahoma ............
Oregon ...............

Landon
66,230
49,642
48,986
907,255
219,955
328,800
58,215
110,672
48,267
83,435
1,748,162
784,854
497,320
415,903
493,396
37,706
209,955
274,434
832,764
858,277
414,913
12,121
739,774
86,667
257,506
15,209
119,173
884,280
71,566
2,306,176
291,682
83,256
1,387,277
281,484
148,261
1,700,642
134,861
7,912
125,006
173,724
183,183
89,035
89,252
134,455
258,720
396,877
448,586
47,500

Roosevelt
212,070
69,515
167,796
1,426,864
248,795
265,870
66,269
195,785
248,165
90,539
1,603,628
785,848
514,300
407,235
563,157
223,977
121,559
311,171
672,124
793,247
504,677
145,775
902,357
129,832
301,628
27,317
81,853
766,298
90,900
2,443,561
527,420
148,180
1,158,509
463,788
233,119
1,282,898
118,749
109,502
137,636
285,799
561,958
127,258
47,144
210,098
376,765
377,981
544,706
48,933,
20,142,555

Estimated
Electoral Vote
Landon Roosevelt
11
3
9
22
6
3
7
12
4
29
14
11
9
11
10
5
8
17
19
11
9
15
4
7
3
4
16
3
47
13
4
26
11
5
36
4
8
4
11
23
4
3
11
8
8
12
3

Landon Asks
That People
SaveLiberty
Brings Final Eastern Trip
To Philadelphia; Asks
'76 To Be Remembered
Lack Of Checking,
Extravagance Hit
'Little Fellow' Comes In
For Much Of Governor's
Attention
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 26.-(R)-
Gov. Alf M. Landon summoned tax-
payers tonight to "take an oath" the
Liberty Bell "shall not have rung in
vain" by defeating a New Deal ad-
ministration which he said "violates
the Constitution."
1 Bringing his final eastern campaign
drive to the birthplace of the Consti-
tution, the Republican presidential
nominee said preservation of that
"charter of our liberty" and "the
American way of life" was the funda-
mental issue before voters Nov. 3.
"This administration," the Kansan
said, "wields the same axe which was
destroyed the liberties of much of the
old world. An unbalanced budget, in-
flation of the currency, delegation of
power to the chief executive, destruc-
tion of local self-government."
Landon spoke in the convention
hall where Democrats nominated his
opponent for a second term.
Waste Is Theme
Taking as his theme "waste and
extravagance" and "open and impu-
dent use of public money for political
purposes" by which he said the New
Deal "upsets" constitutional checks,
and balances, the Governor said:
"It is the people's money-our mon-
ey-that has been used to create the
most sinister political machine of our
history. No words of idealism, no
claims of good intention, can shift
the responsibility for this machine.
The responsibility rests upon one
man-and one man alone. It rests
upon the President of the United
States. * * *
"It is the little fellow who pays.
It is the little fellow who suffers from
government extravagance. It is the
little fellow who needs the safeguards
of the Constitution-and particularly
the safeguards against waste of the
public funds."
Landon pledged:
To end the use of "relief funds" and
"public funds" for "political pur-
poses."
Restore Budget Bureau

A cheering section which will form
the words 'Michigan' and 'Illini' with
the aid of placards has been organ-
ized for the Illinois-Michigan game
Saturday by Jack C. Thom, '38, mem-
ber of the Union executive council,
and Thomas C. Sullivan, '37, head
cheerleader.
All equipment for the demonstra-
tion, in which 1,400 students will par-
ticipate, has been furnished by the
Athletic Administration. The sec-
tion will be in the stands on the west
side of the stadium.
The demonstration will be conduct-
ed entirely during the half interval
when cheerleaders will give instruc-
tions to the cheering section.
Instructions for each member of
the cheering section will be pasted on
the back of his ticket. He will find a,

By Officials

Japan May Join Germany
And Italy in Fight Against
'Communist Corrosion'
'Ideas Alike' Avers
Chief Commentator
Mussolini's Virginio Gayda
Calls Japan 'Advance
Sentinel Against Reds'
ROME, Oct. 26.-(A)-Japan and

Cheering Sectio n talo-Japan
Will Use Placards
At Illinois Gamei Pact Hinted

placard, one side blue and one side' Italy "see eye to eye" against Com-
yellow, secured to his seat by a thumb munism, Italian government officials
tack, Thom said.
Although the cooperation of the said tonight.

Pennsylvania

. . . . . .1

Rhode Island ..........
South Carolina.......
South Dakota-........-
Tennessee ............
Texas ................
Utah .................
Vermont.............
Virginia ..............
Washington ...........
West Virginia .........
Wisconsin ............
Wyoming ............

Varsity Band has not been definitely
obtained; Thom expects assurance of
its cooperation within a few days.
Thom especially urged the order-
liness of the cheering section. "It is'
especially imperative," he said, "that
everyone remain in his seat until at'
least after the half and follow his in-
structions implicity if the demonstra-
tion is to be effective and successful."
All places in the cheering section
have been taken, Thom said.
Faculty's Voting
IIn Presidential
Poll Is Started,
Heads Of Various Colleges
Distribute Ballots Amonga
Their Staffs,
The first day of voting in The
Daily's presidential poll of faculty
members began yesterday. No re-,
sults will be available until tomorrow,,
with the total vote released Thurs-
day morning unless late voting pre-
vents it.
Ballots have been distributed to the
heads of all the schools and colleges
of the University, who are distributing
them to members of their staffs. Fac-
ulty members who have not yet se-
cured their ballot may get one from
the secretary of their department.
Each of the 750 faculty members of
the University who have not yet voted
are asked to cast their ballot today
or tomorrow in order that the final
vote will be ready by Thursday.
A separate count of the ballots of
all members of the faculty listed in
Who's Who is being conducted with
the poll.
The final results of the poll are ex-
pected to be as close as the student
poll conducted two weeks ago and
which gave Governor Landona mar-
gin of only 26 votes out of 3,969 cast.
In The Daily's 1932 straw vote fac-
ulty members gave former President
Hoover 236 votes to 132 for President
Roosevelt, 96 for Norman Thomas
and seven for William Foster, Com-
munist candidate.
HURT IN ACCIDENT
Mrs. S. J. Sayler, 62 years old, 1134
Forest Ave., suffered a possible skull
fracture Sunday night when the au-
tomobile in which she was riding,
driven by Nathan S. Brokaw of Salem
collided with a car driven by Tom
Schoun, 26, 336 E. Washington St.,
at S. University and Forest avenues.

18,963,326

184

347

Dean Bursley's Club
For Freshmen Meets
Dean Joseph A. Bursley's Fresh-
man Luncheon Club will meet for the
first time this year at noon today in
the Union.
Started in 1930 to enable freshmen
to become better acquainted with
members of their class, the club meets
once a week, hears talks by faculty
members, and from time to time spon-
sors other features.
Membership is by necessity limitedj
because the purpose of the club is to
provide a select group of freshmen
and to promote a feeling of friendship
among them closer than can be cul-
tivated in their classes, Dean Bursley
said.
Officers will be elected and name
badges will be used to accelerate the
process of getting acquainted, Bursley
said.
Daily Surveys
Rushing Plans
Of Sororities
In an effort to ascertain the fresh-
man woman's attitude toward the

Lloyd Speaks
On Social Life
Of Sororities.

The officials, however, denied per-
sistent reports of a supposed secret
pact among Germany, Italy and Ja-
pan against Russia and Bolshevism
in Europe and Asia.
An authoritative source said there
was no official indication that Japan
had entered the accord already an-
nounced between Germany and Italy
against Bolshevism.
Rumors of the three-party agree-
ment gained credibility today, how-
ever, because of an article in the
newspaper Il Giornale D'Italia by the
authoritative commentator, Virginio
Gayda.
Gayda, who frequently echoes the
views of Mussolini, wrote that Fas-
cist Italy and Nazi Germany have
"decisively reared up" against Cor-
munism, and that Japan . "adheres"
to their position.
Japan also holds to "the similar-
ity of the two nations' views and pur-
poses," Gayda wrote.
An authoritative source said trea-
ties covering specific points had been
agreed to by Germany, but that they
had not been signed or made public
because Chancellor Hitler, his for-
eign minister, Galeazzo Konstantin
von Neurath, and Mussolini's foreign
minister, Galeazzo Ciano, wished to
leave them open to other European
states.
"Japan is the advanced sentinel of
a living, constructive civilization In
the Pacific which sustains an open
fight for the defense of the entire
Asiatic continent against the corro-
sion of Communism," Gayda wrote.
"Japan also left Geneva (the
League of Nations because of the in-
comprehension of the League in her
vital problem in Manchukuo which
was equal to the incomprehension
demonstrated by the Italian problem
in Ethiopia."
Major Parties
Spend 9 Million
In Camnpaigning-
WASHINGTON, Oct. 26.-(IP)-As
the major parties moved into the last
week of the presidential campaign to-
day, congressional records showed
that together they already had spent
approximately $9,016,973-more than
twice the cost of the entire 1932 cam-
paign.
Congressional attaches estimated
that expenditures by minor parties,
independent organizations and in-
dividual candidates already had
pushed the total campaign outlay
above the $11,000,000 level.
Republican disbursements-includ-
ing exp'enditures of the national com-
mittee, senatorial committee, and
congressional committee-were set at
$6,160,999 in reports filed with the
clerk of the house.
Spending by the corresponding
Democratic agencies totalled $2,856,-
074.
During the entire 1932 campaign
the major parties spent $4,378,000, of
which $2,670,000 came out of the Re-
publican fund and $1,708,000 from
the Democratic.
The costliest campaign on record
was in 1928, when the Republicans
paid out $6,256,000 and the Demo-
crats $5,342,000-a total of $11,598,-
000.
Sophomores Hold
Election Tomorrow

To end use of public funds for the
"growing evil" of "a propaganda ma-
Rutliven Quizzes Audience chine in Washington," saying "the
National Committee of the party in
At Panhellenic Banquet power should pay its own bills."
On 'Well-Known Facts' To restore the budget bureau, which
he said had become "a part of the
Dean Alice C. Lloyd reminded White House spending machine," to
n. "a position of independence with a
sorority women of their tremendous competent director at its head."
responsibility in keeping the morale To fill the office of comptroller
of the campus "strong and high- general, a post he termed "the legal
minded" in her address before guests watch dog over expenditures" be-
at the Panhellenic Banquet last night. cause "everyone knows what happens
"The social life here will be what when the boss is away."
"The day of reckoning always
you want it to be, she stated, and comes," Landon said. "Sometime
by good taste and dignified living you the spendthrift must foot the bill. * *
can make it something to be proud * * We need an administration that
of." realizes even Uncle Sam can go
Unwritten Law broke."

Each one of you represents the
University as much as I do and I'm
sure a mutual expectation exists be-
tween us to make it a good place for.
future generations of college women,
she continued. If you stand for good
living inside and outside the house,
you become an asset to the University.
We have discovered through our ex-
perience with prohibition that there
are certain laws which cannot be leg-

Michigan Gridders Semi-Pros?
'Bunk!' Says Coach Harry Kipke!

coming in last in the Digest Poll. new system of rushing put into effect ally enforced but must come about
This will probably slice down Lan-; on campus this year and also toward through a building up of moral stand-
don's percentage of gain over Hoover, d'deferd h p Th ards or unwritten laws, Dean Lloyd
and may make a Roosevelt landslide propose rrerusing pan, eadded, and good taste and good living
possible. Daily will distribute questionnaires on are an express jon of this unwritten
The question now arises as to how the subjects today to all dormitories law.
to explain the Digest's failure to poll and league houses. Following Dean Lloyd's speech,
a cross section of the voters this year All first year women of the Univer- I President Ruthven proved his' point
in face of its past accuracy. sity whether or not they have been that most university students go
One of the most plausible explana- rushed by a sorority or pledged by through college with their eyes closed
tions is that the Digest poll reaches one, are requested to fill out the ques- when he subjected the sorority wom-
only those people owning automo- tionnaires. It is not necessary to fill en present to a quiz.
biles or having telephones. This out all of the blanks but complete ( za ..

By CLAYTON HEPLER
"Bunk!"
That was Coach Harry Kipke's re-'
action to John R. Tunis' charge in the
current issue of the American Mer-
cury that the University's football
team was semisprofessional. Accord-I
ing to Tunis' classification, all college
teams are divided into three classes,.
amateur, semi-pro and the profes-
sional.
"Everything referring to Michigan
is untrue," Coach Kipke said.
Prof. Ralph Aigler, chairman of the
Board in Control of Athletics, was
even more forceful in his denuncia-
tion of the author. "I have nothing
but contempt for Tunis," he said. "I
won't even read the article. I know
his writings and what they are worth.
He's striving for a cheap sensational-
ism in order to sell his work, and he
will judge an entire sport by the fault
onP ofm a# 4+c, -cnn+4nin.ntc '1

Iowa and Purdue, while those whoj
have reached the professioal stage,
according to Tunis, are Northwestern,
Minnesota, Ohio State and Wiscon-
sin. Indiana was the only Confer-
ence school that wasn't given a rat-
ing by Tunis, who is better known for
his book "Was College Worth While?"
Fielding H. Yost, director of ath-
letics, put no trust in the findingsj
made public by Tunis. "As usual he
makes a lot of statements without
showing any evidence," he said.
"Group B, the semi-pros, is unlike
the others," Tunis states in his ar-'
ticle, "being less homogeneous. Here
are small colleges and large ones, the
chief bond in common being the fact
that all have athletic plants which
cost real money to maintain. This
can be done solely by means of foot-
ball receipts. So naturally these col-
leges strive to subsidize good teams
in order to make their athletic cor-
nnrtin ilotnnnri-oh-

leaves out the lower classes. In for-
mer years the submerged fourth or
fifth was almost evenly divided. How-
ever, this year, with the electorate
apparently divided on class lines
mnore than ever before, the submerged
portion of the population can be
counted on to vote heavily for Roose-
ta t

answers are preferred. Transfer stu-
dents and upperclassmen who are also
being rushed are invited by The Daily"
to answer the questions.
Sorority members are being con-
tacted in the survey in order that the
viewpoints of both affiliated women
and the rushees may be determined
concerning hth the new rushing vs-

wui u usng
The President created a good deal
of confusion among the guests when
he called on a number of the women
at random to provide such supposedly
well known facts as the date and place
the University was founded, 'when
women were admitted, how many stu-
dents are enrolled at present and the

Sophomore elections will be held
from 3 to 5 p.m. tomorrow in the en-
gineering and literary schools, ae-
cording to Miller Sherwood, '37, presi-
dent of the Men's Council. Voting
will take place in Room 348 in the
engineering school and in Room 231
AnLncI1 T Hal

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