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October 23, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

TiI~ hAI~A IAIL

NEWS
of Tie
DAY

A
I

(By the Associated Press)
Blum Accused Of Selling
Fraudulent Bonds
PARIS, Oct. 22.-(P)-Premier Le-
on Blum and Finance Minister Vin-
cent Auriol were charged today with
fraudulently pressing the sale of gov-
ernment bonds, knowing secret de-
valuation negotiations were being
conducted.
The suit was brought by the tax-
payers' federation and was filed by
its president, J. L. Dubreuil, under
an article of the penal code covering
the fraudulent issue of public bonds.
The federation claims more than
1,000,000 members.
An official of the federation said
that if convictions could be obtained,
the federation would institute addi-
tional suits seeking reimbursement of
those who bought the bonds while the
devaluation proceedings were under-
way.

S ), iof the Detroit banks. With the lib-
Sen. fo ral customary distrust of finan-
ciers, a di fo Secretary of the
Ifj- Treasury Mellon and his successor,
Lon C re Ogden Mills, an aggressive opponent
1ntsin D t of President Hoover, he steadfastly
dDe-Ath refused to permit ratification of a
loan that many claim would have
tided the Detroit banks over the
e Suc mbs T A LKId1 e crisis. He refused to defend himself
against the most vitriolic attacks. He
Ailnent After lliness only growled: "They were crooked.
f SvnThey would have to fall sometime.
_____e__ aIsA loan would not be good business
nor honest business."
(Continued from Page I) Endorsed New Deal
If the banking episode were the
to land near Pontia for a colomza- most bitter, certainly his endorse-
-n e ment of President Roosevelt less than
In his stormy political life, which a month before the primary election
really began in 1922 when Alex J. in September was the most startling.
Groesbeck, at that time governor, Couzens had supported most of the
appointed him to the Senate to fill New Deal legislation. His Republican
the vacancy left by the resignation opponents termed him a New Dealer.
of Truman H. Newberry. True, he He was given the endorsement by the
had distinguished himself in Detroit state Democrats more wholehearted-
politics when he won, almost single ly than by the state Republicans. Yet
handed, the battle for municipal impartial observers still conceded him
ownership of street railways; and an excellent chance to win reelection
againtwhen he cleaned graft out of against former-Gov. Brucker. Then
Detroit's police department. came his statement terming a Roose-
But it was as the independent, lib- velt victory "the most important
eral Republican Senator from Mich- matter confronting the nation." His
igan, as the gruff. unbending up- party backers deserted him right and
holder of the people's rights, as a left within 24 hours after the state-
political non-conformist ranking with ment was made. And he lost the
Senators Norris and Borah, that he fight for the nomination, although he
really won his spurs. Although he did poll more than 100,000 votes.
was a skilled politician and knew He apparently did not seem to care.
how to play the game hard and well, And yet he consistently denied the
he played it honestly. He considered charge that his Roosevelt endorse-
government a business, as he often ment came only "after he knew he
took occasion to remark, and one could not be reelected." He did not
time hit a county politician in the campaign at all during the election,
face for suggesting that he secure except to assert some rather pro-
the appointment of a man Couzens New Deal views. But he had never
knew to be the crooked postmaster in campaigned, in the sense in which
a small Wayne county town. the word is interpreted by party poli-
The bitterest fight of his career ticians. He was not a good speaker.
was probably that over the closing It was claimed that his political
_____- _-- ---strength came from his charitable
n le u gifts. But if so, Couzens, it can be
ngle, i OUR said, also stood on his record, always.
Not Affected By Defeat
When he came to dine with Pres-
ident Roosevelt aboard the Presiden-
tial train in Detroit last Thursday he
o Speak H eredid not appear as a man chagrined
~y p1~z. ~by defeat. Never one given to op-
timism, he smiled as he discussed
Lecture Is To Be Given the campaign with friends, and the
At *smile was not bitter.
On Wednesday At Lydia Governor Fitzgerald will now have
Mendelssohn Theatre to appoint a successor to Couzens to
serve out his term, which expires with
the meeting of the New Congress in
Paul Engle, young American poet January. Discussed as possibilities
and Rhodes scholar whose verse hasJary.kDrcussedeaepo zes
been compared to Walt Whitman's, are Brucker, who defeated Couzens
in the primary election; Groesbeck,
will lecture on "The Writing of Poet- who appointed him originally; and
ry," at 8:15 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28, former-Gov. Fred W. Green.

CLASSIFIED
A DVERTI SING-
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Iie per reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one or two insertions. 1Oc per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
2 lines daily, college year ............7c
By Contract, per line- 2 lines daily.
one month.......................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months............8c
100 lines used as desired............9c
300 lines used as desired ............8c
1,000 lines used as desired...........7c
2,000 lines used as desired...........6c
The above rates are for 7? point type,
The above rates arc per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for allcapital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bcld face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price. 6x
TYPEWRITERS
Typewriters
Rentals, Sales and Service
Special Rates to Students
REMINGTON, RAND, Inc.
406 Wolverine Bldg.
Ann Arbor Phone 5888
87x
NOTICES
SOFT WATER shampoo, wave 50c.
Gabrieleen permanents. Best sup-
plies. . Open evenings by appoint-
ment. Juanita's House of Beauty.
3023. 55x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
OLD and new suits, overcoats at $3
and $25. TYPEWRITERS, OLD
GOLD, and musical instruments.
Phone for appointment, 6304.

[_ClassifiedDireetory

CONSIDER YOUR
TREES
Call Mr. Rees at 2-3121, Postal
Telegraph office for free inspection
and estimate. Silva-Pfiefer Co.,'
Tree Surgeons-Foresters. 109
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
PRACTICAL NURSE wishes employ-
ment. Will consider going out of
town. A-1 city references. Calli
2-1865. 102
PRACTICAL nurse wishes ward em-
ployment. A-1 city references. Call
2-1865. 104
ROOMS FOR RENT
DESIRABLE 3 or 4 room furnished
apartment. Upstairs. Reasonable
Call evenings. 928 Oakland. Phone
5740. 107
FOR RENT: Pleasant single room in
new house for man student. Call
5159. 111
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Ladies Benrus wrist watch
near Angell Hall. Finder please re-
turn to Marguerite Ganzhorn.
Phone 5201. Reward. 110
LOST: Woman's wrist watch. Fri-
day night at Beta formal. Vicinity
of Union. Phone 5938. Phyllis
Ludtke. 112

BLACK and white Schaefer fountain
pen with name on it. Bobby Melin.
1205 Hill. Phone 2-2543. Revard.
116
LOST: Snooth brown leather ,jacket.
Reward and no questions asked.
L. D. Packer. Phone 0209. 113
FOR SALE
FOR SALE; Portable Colonial type-
writer-$12.00. 133 Fairview Ave.
114
WANTED
WANTED: Dance orchestra for Oc-
tober 31. Call Al Finly-Phone 4837.
115

Beat Columbia!
By ARBOR SPRINGS
JUST FACTS
Facts do not lie. Facts show
that the coming election has
caused practically every man
and woman to take advantage
of their right to vote. The over-
whelming number of registra-
tions prove this and on Novem-
ber 3 we will know why they
are eager to vote.
Facts show that pure water,
and plenty of it, is most condu-
cive to good health. Drink the
best. Order a supply today from
the Arbor Springs Water Co., of
416 W. Huron, and enjoy the
good effects of a healthful, re-
freshing product. Phone 8270
for quick delivery.

Wayne Coffee Shop
SPECIALS!
LUNCH PLATES .. 15c and 20c
RED HOTS .............10c
TOASTED CHEESE and
BLOCK LETTUCE.........5c
TOASTED ROLLS ........S5c
TWO EGGS fried in butter;
and TOAST...........15c
WAYNE
COFFEE SHOP
Corner Fourth Avenue
and Liberty

4,1 tBO Q

r

p""W "

Action Of Shipyards
To Be Investigated

WASHINGTON, Oct. 22.-(A)-Two
governmental inquiries were ordered
today into charges by a shipbuilders
union that shipyards were deliberate-
ly laying off workers "to arouse an-
tagonism against the Administra-
tion."
The investigations were announced
by the Navy, to which the charges
were addressed, and Secretary Per-
kins, with whom they also were filed.
Admiral William H. Standley, chief
of naval operations said the com-
plaints would be investigated and
action taken if necessary.
The Industrial Union of Marine
and Shipbuilding Workers of Amer-
ica, which filed the complaints with
the Navy, named several companies.
Denials were issued by the Federal
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company
at Kearny, the Newport News Ship-
building and Drydock Company, and
the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corpora-
tion, all among those named by the
union.
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
0:00-WJR Stevenson News.
WWJ Ty Tyson; Dinner Hour.
WXYZ March of Melody.
CKLW String Ensemble.
6:15-WJR Rubinoff-Arthur.
WXYZ Fact Finder.
CKLW News and Sports.
6:30 -WJR Jimmie Allen.
WXYZ Bulletins; Odd Facts.
CKLW Melody Lane.
WXYZ Day in Review.
6:45-WJR Renfrew of the Mounted.
WWJ Musical Moments.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CKLW Rhythm Trio.
7:00-WJR William Hard.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Musicapers.
CKLW Little Jack Little. .... ....
7:15-WJR Popeye the Sailor.
WWJ Evening Melodies.
WXYZ Presidential Poll.
CKLW Prescott's Ensemble.
7:30-WJR Goose Creek Parson.
WWJ Prentiss Brown.
CKLW Melody Interlude.
7:45-WJR Boake Car.ter.
WWJ Football Fanfare.
8:00-WJR Broadway Varieties.
WWJ Jessica Dragonette.
CKLW Captain Frank Hawks.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
8:30--WJR Andre Kostelanetz's
Music.
WXYZ Death Valley Days.
CKLW Show Window.
9:00-WJR Hollywood Hotel.
WWJ Waltz Time.
WXYZ Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians.
CKLW Al Kavelin's Music.
S1t5---CKLW Ph uMarley's Music.
9:30-WXYZ Twin Stars.
WWJ Court of Human Relations.
CKLW Viennese Vagabonds.
10:00 -WJR Royal Football Roundup,
WWJ First Nighter.
WXYZ Court of Honor.
CKLW Cesare Sodero Directs.
10:1 5-WJR Numismatics.
10:30--WJR To Be Announced.
WWJ Red Grange.
WXYZ Lowry Clark.
CKLW Kaiv Kyser's Music.
10:45---WJR Musical Program.
WWJ National Communist Party.
C: LW Naional Democratic Party.
11 :0-W.JR News.
WWJ Bob Chester's Music.
WXYZ~ George Kavanaugh's Music.
CKLW Reans-Rado; Dick Messner's
Music.
11:15--WJR Evening Revue.
QKLW Mystery Lady.
11 :30-WWJ Oance Music.
WXYZ Emil Coleman's Music.
CKLW Little Jack Little.
11:45-WJR Lions Tales; Shep Fields'
Music.
WXYZ Fields' Music.
12:00 --WJR Guy Lombardo's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Shandor: Morris Brennan's
Music.
CKLW Paul Pendarvis' Music.
12:30--WJR Al Donahue's Music.
WXYZ Riley and Farley.
CKLW Paul Pendarvis' Music.
1:00--CKLW Sammy Kaye's Music.

DANCE to the Music of
now playing at
The Michigan League

Friday and

Saturday

Nights

I

78x
EDS

1.00 per couple includes food

READ THE

DAILY CLASSIFI

R.L1

in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The lecture will be given under the
auspices of the Hopwood Committee,
and will include a reading by Engle
from his own works.
According to Prof. Roy Cowden of
the English department and Hop-
wood Committee, Engle is above all
a representative American poet,
whose work is typically American in
character. In this respect, Professor
Cowden said, contact with Engle
should mean eyen more to students
interested in writing than would be
the case ordinarily, since there will
be a closer bond cf union between
the average student and the poet.
Engle is from Iowa and represents!
the great American Middle West, the
Chicago Loop and the rolling Mis-
sissippi. His best-known volume is
probably "American Song" although
he was written two others. "Worn
Earth" and "Break the Heart's
Anger," the last of which appeared
this year, having been written during'
the poet's recent European trip.
Personal contact with an estab-
lished author is the most inspiring
form of stimulus for a student inter-
ested in creative writing, Professor
Cowden said, adding that the fact
that the particular field of endeavour
may be different does not affect this,
inasmuch as the basic problems of
writing are the same for all fields,
and that the medium, whether prosel
or poetry, must express the real feel-
ings of the writer himself.
Engle's appearance here may lead
to a series of similar lectures, said
Professor Cowden, if the public re-
sponse is sufficient to warrant such a
project.
Admission will be 50c, and tickets
are being sold at Wahr's Book Store,
in the Hopwood Room and at the
Lydia Mendelssohn box office.
LAST DAY
"SEVEN SINNERS"
"Straight From The Shoulder"
Starts Saturday

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents
® LIVING CINEMA *
""Rain"
"Borinage"
"New Earth"
=Three films in the new movie
technique originated by
JOR IS IVENS
Distinguished Dutch Director
IN PERSON
CRITICS CLAIM:
"Inspiring " "Unusual " "Unique"
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatrc
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
October 23 and 24, 8:15
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES
Tickets 35c All Seats Reserved

LAST DAY ---
KAY FRANCIS
"GIVE ME YOUR HEART '
Starting Saturday
A Ita
Put them all together 0
...they spell the year's
greatest screen-show!
*JACK BENNY
GEORGE BURNS
GRACIE ALLEN
BOB BURNS and
MARTHA RAYE
* BENNY GOODMAN
and his Orchestra
*SHIRLEY - ROSS
RAY MILLAND
FRANK FOREST
BENNY FIELDS
/Adolph Zukor presents
r
"ytf91i
r-r

I

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