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October 08, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCT. 8,19-6

NEWS

The Rev. H.P. MarleyDiscovers
New Trend In Student Interest

OJ The
DAY

Rtes lel psnes;-, Of "Prey

setit I

the district. The discussions are led 1

(By the Associated Press)
Federation Council
To Convene Today
WASHINGTON-With the unset-
tled fight between William Green and
John L. Lewis before it, the council,
of the American Federation of Labor
will meet here Friday to prepare the
annual report for the national con-
vention at Tampa next month.
M.P.U.C. May Order1
Electric Rate Drop
LANSING-An early order from
the Michigan Public Utilities Com-
mission to the Detroit Edison Com-
pany to reduce its rates for electric
power appeared probable today, with 1
the completion of testimony Wed-
nesday. Chairman William Smith
announced a decision might be re-
vealed this month.
Democrdts 'Outvoted
By G.O.P." In Primary
LANSING--Official canvass of
votes cast in the primaries of this
state, Wednesday revealed that Re-
publicans outvoted Democrats by
from 100,000 to 200,000 votes in every
contest. In the Republican sena-
torial contests 182,682 more votes
were cast than in the Democratic
race for the position, and in the gub-
ernatorial nominations, where there
was less interest in the Republican
contest, the difference was still 99,-
660 votes in favor of the G.O.P. The
Democrats cast 131,580 votes less
than the Republicans in the lieuten-
ant-governor contests.
Warn Fraternities
Of Pledging Rudes
(Continued from Page 1)
lating the number it desires. Between
the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on
this Friday each rushee shall present
to the office of the Dean of Students
his receipt for payment of the fra-
ternity registration fee, and shall re-
ceive in return a blank preference
list.
No rushee will be given a prefer-
ence list except upon presentation of
his receipt. This preference list shall
be taken out of the office of the Dean
of Students to be filled out. Be-

Ag' Seen As Reason by the camp directors or visiting ad-
visors.
For Present Attitude The work project at Dillonvale,
which is an Ohio coal center, con-
"A different trend in student in- sisted of grading and leveling play-
terest, reflecting the restlessness of ground, while at Cumberland Home-t
the present age and a desire to get steads, the campers constructed a
at the American scene first hand," grist mill for the homesteaders. The
was discovered this summer by The work consisted of mixing mortar, lay-
Rev. . P. Marley of the Unitarian ing stone and making home-made
cuRcv.H,.whoPspntMsieyfteksiathreshingles, Mr. Marley said. George
church, who spent six weeks at three Abernathy, who received his Ph.D.'
Volunteer Work Camps in Ohio and degree from the University last June,
Tennessee. was one of the members of the Dillon-
Mr. Marley visited and lectured at vale camp.
the three work camps organized by The Thornhill camp, at the head-
the American Friends Service Com- waters of Norris Lake in the Ten-
mittee in Dillonvale, Ohio; Thornhill, nessee Valley built a dam for a fish
Tenn. and Cumberland Homesteads, breeding pond, operation of the Nor-
Crossville, Tenn. ris Dam threatening the extermina-
The camps are composed of 25 tion of the fish upon which the dis-
young people most of whom are trict is dependent for a livelihood.
college students. They are located
in areas of conflict-racial, class, or

Classified Drectory
LAUNDRY WANTED EMPLOYMENT WANTED
Priced Reasonably
Pricd RasonblyMILT Hearn and his Royal Moroc-
STUDENT LIST
Shirts...TU..E..T...I..T....12c cans Orchestra, Ann Arbor's only
Shorts.. .....................4c olored band. Phone 2-1191. 75
Tops .........................4c JOB as janitor or any kind of work
Handkerchiefs .................2c by middle-aged man. Phone 8873.
Socks........................3c 79
Pajam as ......................10c T-ICES
CO-ED LIST NOTICES
Slips ..........................10c CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
Dresses ........................25c OLD and new suits, overcoats at $3I
Panties ......................... 7c and $25. TYPEWRITERS, JEW-
Handkerchiefs.................2c ELRY, saxophones, and other mu-
Pajamas ................10c to 15c sical instruments. Don't sell before
Hose (pr.) ..................... 3c you see SAM. Phone for appoint-
Silks, wools our specialty. All bundles ments. 6304. 78x
done separately-no markings. Per- LAUNDRY
sonal satisfaction guaranteed. CallA Y
for and deliver. Phone 5594. Silver LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Laundry. 607 E. Hoover. 14x Careful work at a low price. 6x

NURSERY school for children from
212 to 4 years. Morning sessions
only. Call Frances MacNaughton,
5837. 68
MOTHS, bedbugs, fleas, roaches and
other household insects positively
destroyed by hydrocynic-gas fumi-
gation. Endorsed by U. S. govern-
ment and health authorities as the
surest, quickest, safest and most
economical method. We are pro-
fessionals in our line, handle each
problem personally, and give a
written guarantee on all work. Let
(us handle your problem. Dial 3113,
Kurtis Exterihinator Co. 308 May-
nard. 11x
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Waiters without eleven or
one o'clocks. Bright spot, 802 Pack-
ard St. 80

ROOMS FOR
NICE, warm room
porch. Suitable for
dents. 1117 Forest.7

tRENT
with sleeping
one or two stu-
Phone 3909.
74

FOR SALE
LADIES stylish muskrat coat. Size
38. Also man's full dress broad-
cloth suit. New. Size 38. Either
very reasonable. 323 E. William.
73
INDIAN relics. Beadwork. Coins,
Curios. Fossils. Stamps. Weapons.
Catalogue, Kc. Lemley Curio tore.
Northbranch, Kansas. 67

4

~ ~ ~
VACANCY: One-half of attractive
double room. 814 E. University.
Phone 9764. 71
SINGLE rooms for students. $2 and
up. Mrs. Walker. Jennings House,
1142 E. Catherine. 3

WANTED:
ensians.
books in
2-1003.

Several 1936 Michigan-
Will pay good price forj
good condition. Phone
70

rI

industrial-and are organized for
three purposes, Mr. Marley said: to
give the opportunity for young people
to obtain first-hand knowledge of
difficult social and industrial prob-
lems and the psychology of the labor-
ing man; to explore the possibilities
of social change by non-violent tech-
nique; and to construct some physical
project of social significance which
will remain after they leave.
The program of each camp, ac-
cording to Mr. Marley, is based upon
an eight hour day of hard manual
labor upon the physical project for
the men and of laundering, cooking,
cleaning, serving and general wel-
fare work in the community for the
women. Following the evening meal,
a discussion is held of problems of
economic or sociological import to
tween the same hours of the same
above-mentioned day each rushee de-
siring to be pledged shall personally
return to the office of the Dean of
Students the completed list marked
in order of preference, of the frater-
nities from which he would accept a
bid.
The office shall honor these bids
and acceptances according to the re-
spective order of preference, and shall
award each fraternity as near, but not
more than, the number of pledges it
desires, and shall notify both parties
of the agreements made. The fresh-
men shall report at 6 p.m. the follow-
ing Monday at the respective fra-
ternity houses to be pledged.
LEARN
TO DANCE
Social Dancing taught
daily. Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

Smealon Celebrates

100th

Anniversary

William Smeaton, father of Prof.
William G. Smeaton of the chemistry
department, will celebrate his 100th
birthday anniversary Sunday, and
thus become Ann Arbor's only cen-
tenarian.
Mr. Smeaton, who makes his home
with Professor Smeaton, will cele-
brate the day quietly. Spending the
day with him Sunday besides Pro-
fessor Smeaton will be J. Arthur
Smeaton of Springfield, Mass., a son,

o

.5

All This Week -
JOAN CRAWFORD
ROBERT TAYLOR
LIONEL BARRYMORE
FRANCHOT TONE
MELVIN DOUGLAS
in
"Gorgeous
Hussy~l"

i

i

and Ronald Smeaton of Pittsburgh
and Winifred Smeaton of Ann Ar-
bor, grandchildren.
Born in Clackmannan county,
Scotland, Mr. Smeaton came to this
country as a young man after he had
spent most of his boyhood in Can-
ada where he emigrated with his
parents when he was six years old.
Mr. Smeaton, it was reported, is
active and enjoying good health in
spite of his age.
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents
"One of the Most Unusual Pictures
of the Year." -New York Times
Cloistred'
For the first time in history the
l seclusion, forbidding the cloister to
profane eyes was exceptionally lifted
to cameramen. They have been per-
mitted to film the mysteries unveil-
ing intimate scenes of life within
the gates of a cloister for women,
where no man ever entered before.
and
"THE PLOW THAT BROKE
THE PLAINS"
"Go Out of Your way To See This
Picture" -ESQUIRE
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
(New R.C.A. Sound Installation)
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
October 9 and 10 - 8:15
Friday Matinee at 3:15
Tickets 35c - All Seats Reserved

c

They're Cravenetted
$4.00 and
$5.00
THE WILSON
$3.50 j

1t

SUITS by
COHEN, GOLDMAN
Town Weave
$27.50
Saxon Weave
$32.50
Worsted-Tex
$37.50

READ THE WANT ADS LOST: Silver pencil. R. 0. Court-
right, engraved on side. Phone 4480.
S- - --Rew ard.-77

LOST AND FOUND

I

HATS. by Mallory

_

'w arveru
New Fall Styles
35c pr., 3 pair $1.00
and 50c pair
RITZ SHIRTS
Whites $1.45 to $2.00
Fancies $1.59 to $2.00
Allen-A
SHIRTS & SHORTS
SWEATERS
$2.50 to $7.50
ODD T ROUSERS
$3.50 to $6.00
WALKER

Topcoats
and
O'Coats

at

$22.50
25.00
27.50
32.50
37.50

Extra
LATEST MGM NEWS
Coming Saturday
"THE GENERAL DIED
AT DAWN"

THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN
$t"b &6 DA
309 SOUTH MAIN

I

1st Nat'l Bank Bldg.

II

1

II
qI~ ---

._ _ _ _ _
. _. - _._
,..;mot

___ _
-.
V.

=IIl

III

COLLEGIANS Choose
THE DOBBS
KENLEY HALL and the HANLEY HALL

Ifsa

gall1
arOP o
He oSlies
jISts
I ilk e

III
Poiu

Lig ht Smoke
As Gentle as it is DeliciousI
For Lucky Strike is not merely mild and mellow
in taste, but a genuine light smoke which always
treats you gently. You will find it easy on your
throat, kind when you inhale, friendly all day
long. If you believe in a gentle smoke, you be-
lieve in Luckies! Among all cigarettes, this is the
one which offers you the welcome protection of
:/f g that famous process known to the world as
"It's Toasted." And this is the one that millions
turn to--for deliciousness, for protection, for
all-day smoking pleasure! Luckies are A Light
Smoke of rich, ripe-bodied tobacco.
*NEWS FLASH! * *
~Sweepstakes" employs 6,000 to
address entries!
Over 6,000 people are employed in ad-
dressing return entry cards for that
great national cigarette game, Your
Lucky Strike "Sweepstakes." Entries
come from every State in the Union.
Have you entered yet? Have you won
your Luckies-a flat tin of 50 delicious
Lucky Strikes? Tune in "Your Hit
Parade"-Wednesday and Saturday eve-
nings. Listen, judge, and compare the
tunes - then try Your Lucky Strike
"Sweepstakes."
And if you're not already smoking
Luckies, buy a pack today and try them,
too. Maybe you've been missing some-
thing. You'll appreciate the advantages
ofLuckies-a Light Smoke of rich, ripe-

ode"i
ne ai

III!

Both styles proven at the leading universities. $7.50E
I -

F

11111

i

a.---......

NEWM

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