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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 04, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE MICHI+GXN DAILY

IU, DNI T, ;T3AY, ALkRCA 4, 1

TH- ICTG__1~~E WENS._ MRC.4

Medico-Army
Courses To Be
Given In April
Military Department, Navy
Offers Reserve Doctors
Instruction Courses
The annual medico-military re-
fresher course that the United States
army and navy department offers to
its medical and dental officers will
be held here during the period from
April 12-25, it was announced yes-
terday by Dr. Carleton B. Peirce, as-
sociate professor of roentgenology,
who has been appointed executive in
charge of the course.
Medical and dental officers of the
organized reserves, national guard
and naval reserves of the section from
Kentucky to Michigan will attend the
two-week course which will give a
credit of 100 hours to each attending
officer according to a memorandum
from headquarters of the Michigan
reserve district of the United States
army.
Major Harrison W. Stuckey will
come here from Fort Wayne, Ind., to
act as senior army medical officer
during the course, and Lieutenant
Commander J. E. Malcolmson will be
assigned from Detroit to senior naval
medical officer.
Official quarters for the stay here
will be the Union, and uniform has
not been made compulsory, according
to the army memorandum.
Clinical work will be offered in
demonstrations, operative clinics,
ward walks and conferences in gen-
eral surgery, internal medicine and
oral surgery.
Following the medico-military re-
fresher course, the 6th annual post-
graduate course in ophthalmology
and otolaryngology will be held dur-
ing the period April 27 to May 2,
Doctor Peirce said.
Michigan Law Book
Written By Blume
Legal proceedings in the territory
of Michigan between 1805 and 1814
are treated in two volumes edited by
Prof. William W. Blume of the Law,
School.
The two volumes recently publishedj
by the University of Michigan Press,
contain opinions of the territorial
and early state courts some of which
are of definite practical value to the}
lawyer. In commenting on Professor
Blume's work, Dean Henry M. Bates
of the Law School said, "Professor
Blume has shown great energy andl
ingenuity in tracing missing docu-
ments, long buried opinions and other
materials." The book was published
with funds derived from gifts made
to the University by William W.
Cook.

Heads N.Y. Strike

Michigan Is Well Represented
By Alumni At Forest Station

CLASSIFIED _ADVETISING

-Associated Press Photo.
James J. Bambrick, president of
the Building Service International
Union, on whose orders New York
building employes went on strike
paralyzing elevator service in the
city's skyscrapers, is shown receiv-
ing reports at his headquarters.
Refrigeration
Discussed B
Prof. Keeler
State Has Always Produced
A Great Deal Of Natural
Ice, Professor Says
Discussing "Michigan's Refrigera-
tion and Dry Ice Industries," Prof.
Hugh E. Keeler, of the engineering
school, addressed the WJR radio au-
dience yesterday over the University
Broadcasting Service.
"Michigan has always been a large
producer of natural ice for several
reasons," Professor Keeler declared,
"the most important ones being a
fairly large population; a climate fa-
vorable to the production of ice of
adequate thickness; the large num-
ber of inland fresh -water lakes and
streams furnishing ice that is clear
and satisfactorily pure; ease of har-
vesting and good storage and dis-
tribution."
However, the speaker emphasized,
the production of natural ice has
been effected by the extended use
and applications of mechanical re-
frigeration and by the manufacture
of artificial ice. "The ice industry
is continually studying and develop-
ing new methods of production."
"Michigandoccupies a very uniques
and outstanding position in the dry
ice industry for several reasons: first,
the dry ice plant of the Michigan
Alkali Co. which is located at Wyan-
dotte, the largest and most efficient
in the world, and secondly a great
deal of pioneering," Professor Keeler
continued.
The speakergave a short historical
summary of the development of the
industry, pointing out that the man-
ufacture of ice goes back into an-
tiquity, when the natives of India
manufactured ice although the tem-
perature never dropped to the freez-
ing point.
Discussing the apparatus and theory
involved in refrigeration, Professor
Keeler described the modern methods
of its production, application and
control.

Government Hires Many
Of University Graduates
At New Orleans Post
Michigan is perhaps nowhere so
well represented by its alumni as it
is throughout the South, where ten
Michigan men, graduates of the for-
estry school are working for the
Federal government at the Southern
Forest Experiment Station
This station has its headquarters in
New Orleans, but the territory cov-
ered by its investigations stretches
from Florida and Georgia in the East
to Texas and Oklahoma in the West,
comprising a total land area of more
than 200 million acres.
The function of the experiment
station is to determine for this region,
which is capable of producing more
than one third of the timber re-
quirements of the United States, the
best methods of growing timber crops
on forest land, according to Elwood
L. Demmon, '14, who is director of
the forest research in the South for
the Federal government.
By field experiments carried on at
a number of field stations throughout
this region, and which also serve as
demonstration areas, the best meth-
ods of managing and protecting for-
ests for the production of timber,
naval stores, and other forest prod-
ucts, and the effects of forest on
water-flow and erosion, will become
known.
Mr. Demmon pointed out 12 im-
portant lines of investigation the
station is investigating: forest fire
protection, forest measurements, for-
est management, naval stores, for-
estation, forest grazing, financial
aspects of forestry, erosion-stream-
flow control, forest survey, forest
pathology, forest entomology, and
forest biology.
"We in the United States have
been consuming annually more wood
Profa R C. Anell
Treats Effect
Of Depression
(Continued from Page 1)
adaptable, (4.) moderately integrated,
highly adaptable, (5.) moderately in-
tegrated, moderately adaptable, (6.)
moderately integrated, unadaptable,
(7.) unintegrated, moderately adap-
table, (8.) unintegrated, unadaptable.
In cataloguing his results, he found
the first type, invulnerable to any
change, whether it involved a similar,
modified or completely changed fam-
ily position and the second also in-
vulnerable though in a lesser degree.
The third type, that of integrated
but only moderately adaptable fam~-
ilies, he analyzed as vulnerable - that
is it suffered an impairment of dis-
integration of structure because its
existing organization was unable to
cope with the pressure.
The other types varied correspond-
ingly, depending upon their qualities
of integration and adaptability. The
last type, that of the unintegrated,
unadaptable family, he characterized
as a "jellyfish" type. "The reason
seems to be that these families do
not have sufficient structure in the
first place to resist pressure," he said.
"It is as if one were dealing with
a jellyfish. The harder you poke it,
the more it will yield at points of at-
tack, but there can hardly be said to
be a breaking of its structure."
Gray To Be Guest
SpeakerAt S.C.A.
Harold Gray, president of the Sa-
line Valley Cooeprative Farms will be
the guest speaker at the first meeting
of the cooperative movement study
group, of the Student Christian As-'
sociation which will be held at 7:30

p.m. tomorrow night in the Upper
Room of Lane Hall, Miriam Hall,'
Grad., announced yesterday.'
The cooperative movement study
group, which is a sub-committee of
the Student Christian Association's'
commission on Social Study and Ac-
tion, has been studying the consum-
er's cooperative movement, and this1
particular meeting has been called to
stimulate interest in the cooperative
movement among students prior to
the coming of Dr. Toyohiko Kagawa,
Japanese cooperator and sociologist,
who is coming to Ann Arbor during
the latter part of the month.
Mr. Gray will show his motion pic-
tures of the farms and will talk about
them as an experiment in cooperation
and their relationship with the con-
sumer's cooperative movement.

than we are growing. Although this
has been the case for some time past,
it cannot continue indefinitely. Here
in the South a wonderful opportunity
awaits," Mr. Demmon continued.
"Situated in a strategic position
with relation to the future timber
markets of the country and with in-
creasing population, larger quantities
of wood products will assuredly be
needed, regardless of substitutes.
"The need for definite information
as to the best methods of growing
timber in this important timber-
producing region has been recognized
by the Federal government in the
maintenance of the Southern Forest
Station. Through experimentation
we hope to clarify the many timber-
growing possibilities in the South,"
Mr. Demmon concluded.
Besides being the Director of this
complex governmental station, Mr.
Demmon is also president of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Club of New
Orleans, made of close to 65 Michigan
Alumni.
Clubs Annual
Banquet To Be
Held March 12
Local Alumni Will Hear
President Ruthven And
Chase Oshorn
Plans for the annual banquet of the
local University Club to be held
March 12, in the Union, two days be-
fore the completion of the $25,000
drive for the money required for the
Superstructure of Burton Memorial
Tower, were announced yesterday by
Nr. Dean W. Myers, president.
President Ruthven, who will be
making his first appearance since his
accident which has confined him to
bed for the past two months, and
Chase S. Osborri, former governor of
Michigan and a regent of the Uni-
versity, will be the principal speakers
at the banquet.
Non-members are especially wel-
come for the banquet, contrary to the
usual custom of the organization,
President Myers stated, For such
persons the charge will be $1.50 and
notice must be given in advance of
their attendance.
Dr. Myers will preside at the an-
nual event and the president of the
School of Music, Charles A. Sink, will
act as toastmaster. The general
chairman of the ower Committee in
charge of the drive, Arthur W. Stace,
managing editor of the Ann Arbor
Daily News, will speak on the Ann
Arbor Community project.
It is planned to complete the Tow-
er subscription list by March 14, and
almost as soon as the required amount
is raised by the club, construction
will start on the Tower which will
housethe $70,000 carillon given the
University by Charles A. Baird, '95,
prominent Kansas City banker and
lawyer.
Palestine C1ub
Organization On
illelProgram
The Hillel Foundation will feature
the organization of a Palestine Club
on its program for the week it was
announced yesterday. The first
meeting of the club will be held Fri-
day night at the Foundation follow-
ing the regular Friday night ser-
vices which will begin at 8 p.m. Dr.
Heller, director of the Foundation,
will discuss "What I Saw At Palestine
This Summer."
The Sunday forum will be conduct-

ed at 8 p.m. at which Prof. Max
Handman of the economic depart-
ment will question "Is the Emigration
of Jews from Germany the Solution
of Nazism?"
The Tau Epsilon Iota law fraterni-
ty will sponsor the weekly Thursday
afternoon tea at 3:30 p.m., it was
announced.
Saturday night the Hillel Founda-
tion in conjunction with the Hillel
Independents will sponsor a Purim
party in celebration of the holiday. It
is open to all Foundation members
and all Hillel Independent members.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
ldvertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
Yclock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at on
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions. 10c
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Minimum 3 lines per in-
sertion.
relephone rate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
0% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line -2 lines daily,
one month......E..........c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months........8c
2 lines daily, college year ......7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ..... ...8c
100 lines used asdesired . . .9c
;00 lines used as desired<.........8(
1,000 lines used as desired.........<
2.000 lines used as desired.......6
The above ratesaare per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch,
tonic type, upper and lower case. Add
Sc per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line toabove rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 71, point
type.

WANTED: Girls.
University, Apt.
and 12:00 today.

Apply at 1221 S.
I, between 10:30

WOMEN student wanted, graduate
student preferred, to help with chil-
dren and drive car for 4 hours a
day for room and board Apply
Dean of Women's Office. 345
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: A small, sweetheart Phi
IKappa Sigma pin, Betty Wilson.
363 Jordan Hall. 351
LOST: Kappa Kappa Gamma key.
Please return to Jean Hollenbeck,
Martha Cook Bldg. 2-3225. 356

WANTED
SOPH PROM ticket wanted. Call
Klein, 3936. 357

ARROW DRESS SHIRTS

$2.50 $3.50
DRESS COLLARS and TIES

FOR RENT-ROOMS
FOR RENT: Wish to sublet room,
now paying $4.50. Three blocks
from campus, private lavatory, for
$3.00. Box 113. 355
LARGE warm suite for one or two
students. One block from Engi-
neering Building. Reasonable. 1118
S. University. Phone 3743. 311
FOR RENT: Suite with private bath
and shower for three instructors,
students, or business men. Also
single room. Shower bath. Steam
heat. Phone 8544. 422 E. Wash-
ington. 353
FOR SALE
LONG, black velvet evening wrap,
drop-shoulder fur collar. $19. Call
mornings at 723 Church. 358

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY:
reasonable. Free delivery.
3006.

Prices
Phone
6x

ARROA
STATE STREET

Y1

SIC 84~.

AT LIBERTY

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. Ix
NOTICES
ATTENTION MEN: Due to increas-
ing demand, holders of Michigan
Wolverine Cafeteria nemberships,
who desire to sell, will profit by
calling 2-1124 at any meal hour.
D. R. Murdock, Treas. 352
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repairI
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlmann. 354
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice.1549
.Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell befoie you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
lox
i IBt on " leUreses
Boost: Revelile~s
(Continued from Page 1)
the motive, although a decrease in
non-resident students might result.
The deans in the professional school
felt that all increases would cut down
applications, and one remarked that
"we were not anxious to advertise our
low out-of-state rates or make any
special concessions because we have
so many applications." It was felt
the increase would provide automatic
selection of applicants, and this was
especially needed in the case of the
Medical School. Last year more than
700 applications were received while
only 150 could be admitted to the
freshman medical class.
Two committees investigated the
setting of new rates. One was a spe-
cial fee committee appointed by the
Regents, and the other was a com-
mittee composed of the deans in the
various colleges. The rates adopted
were the composite of the advice of
these two committees.

IT _________ I

1 .

el

c AV
TODAY -
DOUBLE FEATURE
Fire in the Sky ! ... A city
blown to bts!... a mighty
background for a
glorious love
story

I
i
t
1
7
7
7
t

REQUEST NUMBER
* To acquire a gay, easy feeling of non-
chalance, it is necessary to know that
you are well turned out...
0 Before your next formal, call on the
Arrow dealer and request an Arrow
dress shirt, collar, tie, and handkerchief,
and be assured of authentic correct style
to the last detail.
0 See the new Vendome Dress Shirt, $3

ARROW

SHIRTS
and TIES

I

MEMWA

L _
-Mi

The University of Wisconsin is just
finishing the building of a new car-
illon that is quite similar to the one
this University will have in a few
months.

Today and Thursday
RONALD COLMAN
"The Man Who Broke the
Bank at Monte Carlo"
and MIRIAM HOPKINS in
"SPLENDOR"
Friday and Saturday --
"Transatlantic Tunnel"
and
"MISS PACIFIC FLEET"

l

r

DOWNTOWN - Next to Wuerth Theatre
The Foremost Clothiers in Washtenaw County

I

'A .

iii

5t

R K O

Continuous 1:30 -11 p.m.
15c to 6 - 25c after 6
Last Times Today
TWO NEW PICTURES!
JACK HOLT
ROBT. ARMSTRONG
GRACE BRADLEY
"DANGEROUS
WATERS"
and
ROGER PRYOR
"Return of Jimmy
Valentine's
TomorrowI
"DARK HOUR" and
"MURDER AT GLEN ATHOL"

v

The Christian Science Organization of the University of Michigan

I

(I

with
PRESTON FOSTER
0
ALAN HALE
BASIL RATHBONE
JOHN WOOD
LOUIS CALHERN
DAVID HOLT
DOROTHY WILSON
WYRLET BIRCH

Picture Directed by Ernest 8. Schoedswk
1ft C.i 6".#
MIGHTIEST SHOW
ALSO-
HEIGH-HO EVERYBODY!
Grosby's Pretty Good, Too .. .
But EDDIE'S Got a Certain
"It" in His Voice!
"HER
MAST ER'S

i

III

S E C OND SE ME ST E R
Secretarial and Business
Day and Evening Classes
STENOTYPY BOOKKEEPING
SHORTHAND CALCULATOR
re con m 1l AI D1 r 1K ""ri -rA ), K

TONIGHT
MICH IGAN
"FUNNIEST STAGE COMEDY
WE HAVE EVER SEEN"
Say George Burns and Gracie Allen
America's Prize-Winning
Stage Comedy
"Hifarious, Funny
and Clever"-

Member of the Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts.
at

III

.

I

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