100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE TWO

_ _ _ _
t .

SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 1024

1.fw It 'VE lTTT~l.lXNT\L\ lATT, 1 i

~TN~bAVA.IWT 1 1ky

F

Prof. Strauss
Sees Brighter
World Outlook
Says Optimist's Philosophy
Has Come From Study
Of Browning's Works
(Continued from Page 1)
tural level, but more important, he
emphasized, it will elevate the greater
mass of students exposed to educa-
tion.
"So you see," and here Professor
Strauss chuckled, "although I am
retiring because I am too old, I don't
think my times were better than the
present."
As for changes in the University
Professor Strauss says they have been
"tremendous," but nevertheless he
thinks Michigan was "not less great
then (when he came here as a student
around 1890) as a University thai
now, and it had as many great men
in proportion." A university, how-
ever, he added, "is always bigger
than the men in it, even the big men."
Presidents Cooperative
"Very happy" in his work, Profes-
sor Strauss emphasized that he was
"finely supported by several presi-
dents" of the University. He became
chairman of the English department
at the same time that Marion Leroy
Burton took up his residence in the
President's home, "and both he and
Dean Effinger (the late John R. Ef-
finger, dean of the literary college)
were very helpful in building up the
department."
College newspapers, believes Pro-
fessor Strauss, who is serving his
fourth year as chairman of the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions, "do a real service in keeping
the students in touch with the world
and the campus. And they are an
important educational factor in
training the men who work on them
for the field of journalism."
Professor Strauss paid high compli-
ment to his successor, Prof. Louis I.
Bredvold of the English department,
but his praise was no more than
Professor Bredvold had for him.
Is Renowned Fisherman
But, even more than all his schol-
arlyuachievements,this interviewer, a
very persistent but very ill-fated fly-
caster, is impressed with Professor
Strauss' prowess as a fisherman.
Fishing is his chief hobby, and the
three-foot, seven-inch muskellunge
mounted on his study wall testifies
to his ability at that sport. Caught
in the Lake of the Woods, Ontario,
the fish weighed more than 35
pounds. And this fish story is on
the up and up, too, because Profes-
sor Strauss has witnesses to the
fact that he himself hauled it in.
Sixty-four years old now, Profes-
sor Strauss has another year before
he may retire voluntarily. He plans
to continue teaching, and says he
may not retire until he is 70, the age
of compulsory retirement. And
speaking of the rule of compulsory
retirement at 70, Professor Strauss
thinks it "is a good rule, but like all
good rules, it should not be too in-
flexable."

THE WEEK IN RE=VIEW
World and National News In Brief

WORLD

Insurrection And

Resur-

rection
Premier Keisuke Okada, bobbing
up alive yesterday after the entire
world believed him assassinated, pro-
vided the dramatic climax to a four-
day military revolt in Japan. Still
dead remained Minister of Finance
Karekiyo Takahashi; Viscount Ma-
kato Saito, Lord Keeper of the Privy
Seal; Gen. Jotaro Watanobe, Inspec-
tor General of Military Education;
Col. Denzo Matsuo, brother-in-law
and secretary to Okado, for whom
he was mistaken by revolting army
officers Wednesday morning, and
some 30 others.
Apprehensive lest the growing
sentiments against conquest indicat-
ed by the Japanese people in last
Thursday's elections bring about con-
ciliatory policies in government af-
fairs, a group of extreme militarists
Wednesday morning set out to eradi-
icate liberal leaders and seize the
government. For 24 hours, 12,000
loyal troops sought to restore order
under martial law, while complete
telephone communication with the
outside world was cut off. Yesterday,
after four days of disorder, the last
of the rebels surrendered.
Whichever way the new govern-
ment turns, it seems destined for
trouble. If the Emperor accedes to
the demands of the army for a cab-
inet dominated by militarists, he
faces civil disturbances and continua-
tion of an expensive and internation-
ally dangerous policy; if, on the other
hand, he recognizes the growing lib-
eralism among the people, he faces
a repetition of this military disorder.
Watching with particular interest for
the Emperor's decision are China and
Russia.
Defensive Agreements
Torn between suspicion of Mus-
covites and envy for the strength of
Soviet army and air forces, the
French Chamber of Deputies debat-
ed heatedly this week a five year
Franco-Soviet pact of mutual assist-
ance. Finally, by a surprisingly large
majority of 353 to 164, the measure
passed and was sent to the Senate
for approval, which may not come
in this session despite pressure.
Proclaimed, as was the Franco-
Russian alliance before the War, a
purely defensive agreement, the pres-
ent pact differs in that it is drawn
to be within the framework of the
League of Nations, and in the ab-
sence of territorial intent in the pres-
ent instance. The Reich was quick
to interpret the move as a gesture in
the direction of a nutcracker grip on
Germany, and is reported chagrined
L _ .1

at the entrance of Russia once more
in Western European politics.+
Naval Conference
Apparently undisturbed, however,
Germany has continued to be coop-
erative at the London Naval Con-
ference, joining with Great Britain
and the United States in a proposed
three-power treaty. France, recov-
ered from her sullenness, suggested a
four-power pact, between Great Brit-
ain, France, Italy and the U.S., with
a separate treaty between Great
Britain and the United States. Italy,;
however, refused, citing technical dif-
ferences, although really angry about
sanctions.
Five-Piower Pact Falls;
In the same spirit of a "breath-
ing spell," Hitler turned down Mus-
solini's proposed five-power combi-
nation (Italy, Germany, Poland,
Austria and Hungary). Rebuffed,
but not dismayed, Il Duce is report-
ed planning to denounce the Locarno
Pact and the Italo-French agree-
ment of last January. Meanwhile, in
Great Britain, a gloomy speech by
Sir Anthony Eden prepared the way
for a heavy billion and a half dollart
armament program.t
N ATI AL
The Budget
On Friday President Roosevelt an-
nounced a budget proposal to meet
the crisis produced by AAA invalida-
tion and passage of the Bonus Act.
Calling for 1,137 million dollars, the
proposal suggests 786 million addi-
tional annual revenue for the next
three years and 620 million annually
for the following six years.
Republican Senators Dickinson and
Hastings immediately jumped on the
proposal's most politically vulnerable
point-"letting Congress worry about
raising the revenule." Democratic
Representative Doughton, chairman
of the Ways and Means Committee,
predicted the proposal's passage and
said his committee would present a
bill in final shape by April 1. Yester-
day, foreseeing possible dissatisfac-
tion among their constituencies, a
number of Democrats withdrew their
support, but a majority of the usual
administration backers fell behind
the President again.
Meanwhile Congressional inflation-
ists who were caught napping by the
President's sudden proposal planned

a vigorous advocacy of the Patman
Greenback Bonus Bill.
IreJ Raiser
Angry Republicans pounced on the
war department order to Maj.-Gen.
Johnson Hagood, commander of the
Eighth Corps Area and the Third
Field Army, to return home and
"await orders." The official reasons
given were General Hagood's char-
acterization of WPA spending as
"pouring money down a rat hole,"
and other examples of "intemperate
statements" in his 18 years as
as a standing general. Holding the
President directly responsible, Re-
publicans flayed unmercifully, while
Representative Blanton, (Dem., Tex.)
of Texas labelled the order "damn-
able, infamous, dirty and inexcus-
able."
The Week In Congress
The House sent the Soil Conserva-
tion Bill to the Senate where it was
amended and later accepted by both
houses. Officials estimate that had
the measure been in effect during
1935 farmers would have received 22
per cent more total income from
sales of crops and Federal benefits
than they did. As to its constitu-
tionality, Senator Smith, chairman
of the Agricultural Committee, said
it was "as constitutional as a matter
of this kind can be." It was sent
to the President for his approval.

Modem ll MNa 's
God Is Subject
At 5 Clurches
(Continued from PIge 1)
the sermon and service at 11 a.m. bya
the Rev. Henry Lewis. Mr. Neil Stac-
bler will speak at the ev nin eet -
ing in Harris Hall at, 7 p .
The Rev. Fred Cowin will deliver
the sermon at 10:45 a.m. in the
Church of Cii:is Disciples. H. L. Pick-
erill will lead the students' Bible (lass
at noon. At 6:30 p.m. a discussion
on "What is the Meaning and Pur-
pose of Lif,?" will be continued from
last week.
Regular morning worship at the St.
Paul's Lutheran Church will start at
10:45 a.m. with a sernon by the Rev.
Carl A. Brauer. The Student-Wal-
ther League meets at 7 p.m., followed
by a showing of the motion picture,
"The Call of the Ages."
German Services Planned
The Zion Lutheran Church will
have a service in German at 9 a.m.
The regular service with a sermon
"The Cross a Necessity" will be held
at 10:30 a.m. Prof. Ferdinand N. Men-
efee of the engineering college will
speak on "Inroads of Communism in
America" at 6:30 p.m.
The morning worship service of the
Trinity Lutheran Church begins at
10:30 a.m., with a sermon on "God
and the Cross -Inseparable."
"Our Debt to the A-Typical" will
be the subject of the twilight service
of the Unitarian church at 5:30 p.m.
At the meeting of the Liberal Stu-
dents' Union, at 7:30 p.m., previews
of films taken in Europe and Russia
will be shown.

Classified Directory
NOTICES LAUNDRY
STATIONERY: Printed with your STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Pices
name and address. 100 sheets, 100 reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles. 3006. 6x
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
MC'S TAXI-4289.Try our of i- Careful work at low price. 1x
cient service. All new cabs. 3x LAUNDRY, carefully washed in soft
EYES examined, best glasses made at water and hand ironed. Reason-
able. Telephone 7287. 11x
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.- -- NE
graduate, 44 years practice. 549 WANTED
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x WANTED: Job cooking for fraternity
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll or running board. First class ref-
SELLYOUROLD LOTHS: W'll erences. Phone 3067.
buy old and new suits and over- -____ ____Phone_3067.
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest FOR SALE
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam. FOR SALE: White formal almost
Phone for appointments. 2-3640. new. Size 18, $10.00. Call between
10x one and five afternoons. Phone
3991. 347
FOR RENT - ROOMS
SINGLE room in private home. 1213. SERGEANT REENLISTS
S. State across from Yost Field Sergeant Karl O. Hoguist of the
House. One other room. 348 University R.O.T.C. Corps will get
WOMEN student wanted, graduate his name on the War Department
student preferred, to help with chil- records March 11. On that date he
dren and drive car for 4 hours a willcome to the end of his present
day for room and board. Apply
Dean of Women's Office. 345 enlistment period and reenlist for
I three years. Of the 11 years which
FRONT ROOM for women. One-half
block from University High. Phone he has spent in the U.S. Army, five
7238. have been on the campus.
SUDDEN
SERVICE

U

Fj i

THE

GAGE LINEN SHOP
is now showing
A New and Complete Spring Stock
You will like our attractive luncheon sets . . .
and the cocktail napkins ... bridge sets .. . and

i
l

G

TODAY through
TUESDAY

our fancy bath towels.

Prices are reasonable.

-$W

1I

FA

A

I11

I

'UB , I'' N

LEARN
TO DANCE
Social Dancing taught
daily. Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

TURKEY
DINNER
Sunday - 12 Noon to 8 P.M.
Soup - -_
Celery - Olives
Fruit Salad - Peas
Mashed or French Fried
Potatoes
Rolls and Butter
Pie - Ice Cream
Coffee - Tea - Milk
Sixty-Five Cents
~M-
Btig h t So0t
802 Packard Street
Other Dinners - 35c to 50c

1 NG CROSBY - ETHEL MERMAN - CHARLIE RUGGLES.
Ida Lupino o Grace Bradley e Music by Cole Porter
D ir eceted by L ew is M ile s t on e A Pa ra m ount P ictiure
Also -- I Guest Feature Monday
Tl TTT 'Tl11.A1TIIIf' SYLVIA SIDNEY

11

III

PAUL TOMPKINS
Rhythm at the Barton

HERBERT MARSHALL
in "Accent on Youth"

'I

6 :00-WWJ Catholic Hour.
WJR Hour of Charm.
WXYZ Rosary Hour.
CKLW National Amateurs.
6:30-WWJ Story of Song.
WJR Smilin' Ed McConnell.
CKLW Star Dust.
6:45-WJR Voice of Experience.
7:00-WWJ "K-Seven."
WJR Eddie Cantor.
WXYZ Jack Benny.
CKLW Black and White.
7:15-CKLW The Forum Hour.
7:30-WWJ Fireside Recital.
WJR Phil Baker.
WXYZ Bob L. Ripley.
7:45-WWJ Sunset Dreams.
CKLW Song Symphony.
8:00-WWJ Major Bowes' Amateurs.
WJR Understanding Opera.
WXYZ Evening Melodies.
CKLW Master Musicians.
8:30-WJR WJR presents.
WXYZ George Kavanagh.
CKLW Will Osborne.
8:45-WXYZ Gray Gordon.
9:00-WWJ Merry-Go-Round.
WJR Sunday Evening Hour.
.WXiYZ Life is a Song.
CKLW Pop Concert.
9:30-WWJ Album of Music.
WXYZ Walter Winchell.
CKLW Vincent York.
9:45-WXYZ Paul Whiteman.
10 :00-WWJ Symphony Concert.
WJRHouse of Thousand Eyes.
CKLW Crime Trials.
10:30-WJR Jack Hylton's Orchestra.
WXYZ "The Hornet."
CKLW Baptist Church.
11:00-WWJ The Melody Master.
WXYZ Baker Twins.
CKLW Freddy Martin.
11:15-WXYZ Lowry Clark.
11 :30-WWJ Jessie Crawford.
WJR Ghost Stories.
WXYZ El Chico.
CKLW Ted Weems.
12Midnight-WWJ Weather Forecast.
WJR Bert Stock's Orch.
WXYZ Henry Biagini.
CKLW Russian Art Orchestra.
12:15-.-CKLW Phil Harris.
12:30-WJR Harry Sosnick's Orch.
WXYZ Phil Olnan.
CKLW Will Osborne.

Today - Mon. - Tues.
JACK OAKIE, JOE PENNER in
"COLLEGIATE"
JOHN CARROL in
"HI GAUCHO"
"CAMERA THRILLS" Novelty
Wed. - Thurs.
"The Man Who Broke The
Bank at Monte Carlo"
and "SPLENDOR"

Fit

I

i

L

...
----

lIll

TODAY!
MATINEE 25c UNTIL 2 PM.
Thereafter 3 5

o' JOA J "

Continuous Shows Today
1 to 11 P.M.
Shows 1 - 3 - 5 - 7 - 9

ONE NIGHT ONLY
Next ednesday Night
({Curtain at 8:15 P.M.)
FROM 325 PERFORMANCES IN
DIRECT C'HICAGO - SAME DYNAMITE CAST
America's Prize-Winning Stage Comedy

I

III

A

J1

Continuous 1:30 - 11 p.m.
15c to 6 -25c after 6
-NOW
JACK HOLT
ROBT. ARMSTRONG
GRACE BRADLEY
"DANGEROUS
WATERS"
and
ROGER PRYOR
"Return of Jimmy
Valentine"
---- Extra-- -
EDGAR GUEST
JACK DENNY II NEWS

STAGE HIT
OF 1935!
462
LAUGHS

ALEX YOKEL presents
O "

"I wouldn't miss
"Three Men on
a Ilorse'if it cost
$10 a seat."
-WALTER
WINCHELL

r

II

'I

To Eliminate UNNECESSARY BULK
Under Your SPRING Frocks
OurNew P AIE GI DLE
is the Answer to the Problem.
It comes with Three Detachable Crotches.

Stage Sensation of Tcn Years!
By John Cecil iloim and George Abbott, Staged by Mr. Abbott

C II;ARLES COLLINS in Chicago Tribune said: "A very funny
day! This sweeing success arouses laughter from first to last."

I-

F I

I

SMre i ahugors, Spice and Action
Ta ( Clwris Girls' Picnic!

I III . . , 1 ;L-~'Z"4 / # ce" rolaV }'- '2! f A (- W °" amlylp -I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan