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June 03, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-06-03

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JUNE 3, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGETHREE

- - -- --- ----------- - -- - ------------

Rain Postpones Iowa Opener;

Teams

Play

For

Title

Today

-- -n

The PRESS ANGLE
By GEORGE J. ANDROS
Lucky Rain???
ONE of the local sports gentry, who knows whereof he speaks concerning
baseball and the Michigan team, has come up with the observation
that yesterday's deluge was a stroke of good fortune for the Wolverines.
He bases his statement on the belief that Coach Fisher's nine has a much
better chance of winning the Conference title in one game with Iowa with
Capt. Berger Larson doing the throwing than had a two-game series been
played with Herm Fishman, the smiling sophomore, dividing the mound
duties against the Haweyes' ace southpaw, Charley Blackman.
Fishman has won every one of his eight starts this season, but our observer
seems to believe the easy-going Detroiter was about due for a bad day-
which might well have come against the Iowa team that has won 16 out of
19 this spring.
And perhaps there is some truth behind this thought. Herman had quite
a little luck with him when he beat Michigan State last Saturday. The
Spartans gave George Rudness, Vic Heyliger and Merle Kremer some fast
stepping to gather in outfield drives on several occasions. Against Purdue
and Illinois Fishman had a clouting ball club behind him, something
the Wolverines have not been of late, and the Boilermakers and Illini both
were hitting the ball hard-if not safely.
Politeness...
THE BOWING and cap-doffing on the base paths that seems to be
the thing in Japanese baseball was hinted at in Monday's abbreviated
tilt with Waseda University.
Satake ,the Nipponese shortstop, slowed down noticeably in approach-
ing first base in the first inning when, big John Gee crossed his pathin
coming over to cover the bag on the former's hard drive to first baseman
Joe Lerner.
The average American baserunner would have run into John with-
out slowing his pace, or at least would have hit the dirt hard around
the tall hurler's legs.
Go, the visitors' Babe Ruth, merely tipped his hat and smiled when
Umpire Bill Snyder called him out at first when he appeared to be safe
by a good margin.
Two more peculiarities of the Oriental variety of the great American
pastime were evident when the Waseda infielders dispensed with the
usual "pepper-talk" and did not throw the ball around the infield after
each completed play.
Capt. Berger Larson and Herm Fishman became two embarrassed boys
in the course of the afternoon. Berger, because he had nothing to give the
Waseda team in return for a pennant they presented him, and Herman
because the Japanese third baseman smiled and moved in when the Michigan
pitcher coaching at third yelled to Don Brewer to lay down a bunt. The
Nipponese players understand some English, particularly baseball terms, but
cannot speak the language.
* * * *
'Beat Michigan'. ..
ICHIGAN STATE fans take their baseball much more seriously than
do the local variety, it appears, and especially when the opposition is
Michigan.
We have been watching the Spartans and the Wolverines clash on Me-
morial Day in our old home town ever since we can remember, and every game
is a signal for a record turnout of rabid fans who have but one thought in
their minds: Beat Michigan and do it up well.
Every move made by a Michigan player Saturday was the signal for an
outburst from the stands-most of them insulting, but the few Michigan
rooters took sweet revenge in the eighth and ninth innings when the Wol-
verines came through with five runs and a 5-2 decision.
* * * *
'Gas House Gang'....
COACH RAY FISHER'S boys lived up to their monicker as "The Gas House
Gang" on more than on1e occasion. Herm Fishman doubled to center
in the sixth inning but Coacher Steve Sebo called for the ball on first base
and Umpire Red Hicks called the Michigan pitcher out for failing to touch the
sack on his way around.
Herm liked this not a bit, and it was quite some time before he consented
to leave the field. He didn't stop talking to the umpir.e even then, however,
and stepped out of the dugout every time a teammate reached first to assure
Hicks that the bag had been touched by the runner.
John Jablonski threw his bat to the ground in the eighth after Tom
Brannick behind the plate had called a doubtful strike. Coach John Kobs
also came out of the dugout in a hurry once to protest a decision against
the Spartans at second.
Jabby's Revenge*...
TABLONSKI was the particular target for the abuse of the fans when he,
Joe Lerner, and then Fishman got their signals crossed and let two
high fouls drop to the ground between them.
John got ample revenge in the eighth inning, however, when he turned
fake applause by the Spartan rooters into cheers from the few Michigan
supporters by singling home the tying run, and and then throwing off
his mnask to gather in a high foul near the back stop when the putout
was extremely important.
N e i Dn *
Nice Going, Danny.-..-

DANNY SMICK, one of Bennie Oosterbaan's leading freshman pitchers,l
hurled a no-hit, no-run game for a Ferndale team Sunday, defeating the
Seven-Mile Road Stars, 9 to 0. Smick permitted only two runners to reach
first, both on passes. He later caught one of these two off base, so that only 28
batters faced him. He struck out 16 men.

Larson Pitches
Against Stoong I
Hawkeye ine
Wolverine Captain hurlsI
Last Game; Illinois Now
Out Of Race
By FRED De LANO
Ray Fisher and Otto Vogel, the
men that have coached the baseball
teams of Michigan and Iowa to with-
in one game of the 1936 Big Ten
championship, yesterday saw a tor-
rential downpour wash away the
scheduled series opener and thehn
spent last night praying that the
same thing doesn't happen today.
Secretly each man thinks the rain
was a lucky break for his club and
openly Wally Roettger, former St.
Louis Cardinal star who now coaches
at Illinois, is disgusted with the en-
tire Ann Arbor situation. The Illini
are now mathematically out of the
title race and the winner of this af-
ternoon's battle which starts at 4
p.m. on Ferry Field will be the new
champion, the loser dropping to third
place in the final standings.C
Is Season's Final
Had the teams been able to play
both games and had split, as many
of the alleged experts expected them
to do, the idle Illini would have been
shoved into the top spot. The game
today will be the Big Ten final for
both the Wolverines and Hawkeyes
and the last of the former's 25-game
schedule.
If rain forces the cancellation of
today's classic Michigan and Iowa
will share the Conference crown as
the rules state thatgames are notsto
be postponed unless another series
is to be played between the teams.
Thus, in case of rain, the season is
already over.
Both teams realize that they have
everything at stake and are ready to
go the limit for victory. Umpires
Vick and Brannick are likely to be
in for an afternoon of debate if any
close plays arise, for neither club
plans on yielding to the other with-
out a scrap.
Iowans Possess Power
It will be the great offensive power
of the Iowans pitted against the wise
leadership and sharp breaking curve
of Capt. Berger Larson that will fea-
ture the battle, and with both clubs
having better than ordinary pitching
staffs, a low scoring tilt is foreseen.
Only once in his coliege career has
Berger been jerked from a game, and
the Michigan captain is determined
that the second occurrence will not
come today.
Coach Vogel was not fully decided
last night on just which of his three
star hurlers he would start on the
hill, but will probably give Lowell
Gosser the call. As yet Gosser is
undefeated in Conference competi-
tion and appears capable of giving
the Wolverines all the throwing they
wat to see in one game.
It will be the final game in the
collegiate careers of six Michigan
men, five of them regulars. Besides
Captain Larson the seniors who will
be fighting for a Big Ten title in their
last appearance are Joe Lerner, Carl
Ferner, George Rudness, John Jab-
lonski and Mike Miller. All but
Miller will be in the starting lineup
which has remained unchanged
since the season's opener except when
injuries forced a temporary revision.
- - -.........- -

Sherwood Leads Netmen In
BIack To Nature' Movemnenii
By CARL GERSTACKER Iof the boy's tournament at Culver,
His duties as president of the jun- when he was a sophomore in high
or engineering class, president of the school. Sherwood had the misfor-
men's council, a Vulcan "God ofj tune to draw Frankie Parker, who
Fire," a Michigamua "Brave"- at the time was the outstanding boy
y'e aplayer in the country ,and was put
they're all forgotten when Miller fin his place with a 6-0, 6-0, trimming.
Sherwood dons his shorts and starts He is very proud of the fact that he

Furious Faculties
To S(ettle Grudge
In (CallengeClash t
With rivalry as intense as the
cliampionshi pbattle acrossethe wall,
faculty teams from the English and
Romance Language departments will
meet at 5 p.m. today on South Ferry
Field in a grudge softball game. .
The game follows a bitter challenge
by the English department's hard-
hitting outfielder, Rice, to Merlino,
flashy infielder for Romance Lan-
guage.
Batteries for the English depart-
ment will be Aaron and Fries; for
Romance Language, Sewell and Skor-
nia.
---- - - - --- - - - - -

MEN'S

COOL

and

COMFORTABLE

POLO

SHIRTS

i

driving tennis balls across the net.
Miller as captain-elect of next
year's Varsity net squad, is a guiding
spirit in the "back to nature" move-
ment among tennis players. Declar-
ing that "if you once try them, you'll
wear nothing else," Miller insists that
shorts are the only practical garment
for tennis. In fact he even talked a
skeptical reporter into buying a pair.
One of the "best sports" among
the Michigan athletes, he always
shows his opponent every courtesy.
When the going is toughest and
things aren't breaking his way, you'll
find him looking scornfully at him-
self and saying, "Oh Miller, you damn
fool."
Sherwood's fine play in the Big
Ten tennis meets-he being almost
solely responsible for the Wolverine's
placing well up in these meets for
the past two years-is probably due
in part to his experience in tourna-
ment play.
One of the worst beatings, Miller
ever suffered, came in the first round
Varsity Golfers Sweep
Matches With Freshmen
Al Karpinski's 74 was low score yes-
terday as the Varsity golfers made a
clean sweep in their matches against
the Freshmen. Karpinski defeated
Ken McCarran, 3-0.
In the other matches Al Sauiders
defeated Al Krueger, John Mooney
defeated Bill Gabriel, Emil Gallas
beat Bruce Smith, and Fred Schwarze
won over Bill Griffiths. The score in
all of these matches was 3-0.
Rain halted five of the matches
and weather permitting these will be
played today at the University golf
course.
Major Leagues
AMERICAN
Boston 14, Cleveland 6.
Chicago 11, New York 9.
Detroit 5, Philadelphia 4.
Washington 15, St. Louis 11.
NATIONAL
St. Louis 5, Brooklyn 4.
Pittsburgh 5, Boston 4.
Cincinnati 9, Philadelphia 8.
Chicago, New York (rain).
APPOINT CHEERLEADERS
Tom Sullivan, head cheerleader,
announced yesterday that Les Eames,
'39, Bob Canning, '39, Dave Beach,
'39, and Bob Dimler, '39, have been
appointed sophomore cheerleaders
for the 1936-37 season.
LIGHTER
WHITER-
BRIGHTER-
THE SMART and
SIENSIBLE MODE of
DRESS
For Summer Comfort

had Frankie 40-15 in one game before
he lost it, however.
Besides his encounter with Parker
in the national boy's tournament,
Sherwood entered the national jun-
ior tournament twice. His greatest
success on the courts came in the
Western Michigan junior open tour-
nament when he was beaten by Jay
Cohn, former national boy's cham-
pion in the finals.
Miller came to Michigan from
Grand Haven, where he made a repu-
tation for himself in tennis and bas-
ketball, holding the State tennis
doubles championship as a junior at
Grand Haven high school and win-
ning a place on the State Class B
basketball team as a senior.
. m

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PRICE

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