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June 03, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-06-03

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THE MICffM DAItf

WEDNESDAY,

3,

......... . .........

WEDNESnA'Y, 3,

Sleeps On His Feet

--Associated Press Photo.
John Begarano (above), 39, pris-
oner in the Denver county jail on a
vagrancy charge, sleeps standing
up. Jail physician said he is suffer-
ing from a disease with symptoms
of sleep walking. It may have re-
sulted from a fall from a bridge
four years ago.
Detroit Struck
Worst Storm
In Many Years
DETROIT, June 2.- () -The
worst storm in Detroit's recent his-
tory swept over the heart of the city
late today, killing two persons, un-
roofing several buildings, uproot-
ingi trees, breaking windows and
damaging hundreds of automobiles.
Mrs. Hazel Taylor, 31, a bride of
six months, was killed by lightning
as she walked home from a grocery.
William Gattamelta, 15, was killed
when a 60-mile gale blew a traveling
crane from its moorings on the
Wabash Railway right of way. A
huge metal girder fell on the boy as
he ran home, through the storm,
from a baseball game.
At least five persons were injured
seriously enough to require hospital
treatment. Joseph Kochanski, 48,
who grasped a live wire blown down
by the wind, was revived after he had
been reported dead. Most of the
others injured were cut by glass and
flying debris.
A tree fell on a street car at Joseph
Campau and Madison Avenues, a few
blocks from the center of the city.
None of the passengers were injured.
The press box- was blown from the
roof of the grandstand at Navin Field
and scattered over the diamond.
Chapin To Conduct
Summer Sketching
Prof. Myron B. Chapin, who has
recently returned to the University
from a year's leave of absence, will
conduct a class in outdoor sketching
this summer as part of the College of
Architecture's summer program.
The work of the class will be car-
ried on in charcoal, pencil, oil, and
water-color, with particular atten-
tion to the latter. The class will meet
four times a week, and material for
its study will be found in the parks
and environs of the city. An exhibi-
tion of its work probably will be held
in the Architectural School at the
end of the surnmer.
Engraved $
100 Cards & Plates
THE ATHENS PRESS
Printers
City's Lowest Prices on Printing.
308 North Main Street - Dial 2-1013

League Fights
Reds, Disloyalty
To Constitution
Literature Distrilted In
State Reveals PIlanT lo
Fight Disloyalty
(Continued Irom Page )
moved from membership for any one
of the following reasons:
Disloyalty to the United States of
America; willful disobedience of the
by-laws and regulations of the chap-
ter and of the state corporation;
commission of a crime involving mor-
al turpitude or scandal; conduct pre-
judicial to the best interests of the
C.P.L.; membership in any organiza-
tion advocating the overthrow of our
constitutional form of government
shall be considered prima facia evi-
dence of disloyalty."
Each chapter is divided by the con-
s itution of the hlaue mainto : nurn-
ber of commit ecs. The "pro ective
group committee" selects individuals
from the chapter who are itLed for
and can serve on protective groups,
and aids in organizing and training
protective groups, The "public re-
lations committee" is the "most im-
portant committee in the educational
program of the C.P.L. It establishes
relations with the newspapers and
the public press, radio, public offi-
cials, Chamber of Commerce, Man-
ufacturer's Association, schools,
school officers and the leaders of
business and industry to se that
they arc kept informed of the pro-
gram, objectives and progress of the
C.P.L."
The "coordinatingcommittec con-
fers with all patriotic and civic
groups, such as the American Le-
gion, V.F.W., Rotary, Kiwanis, D.A.R.,
etc.-particularly with the intelli-
gence and anti subversive committees
of all such organizations-to pro-
mote patriotism and Americanism."
There are also financial and mem-
bership committees which serve utili-
tarian ,mechanical purposes.
Part of the plan of the League as
stated in its constitution is coopera-
tion with county officials. "The de-
fense plan," it states, "assumes that
the protective group officer and his
group leaders will be deputized as
deputy sheriffs. It will be the duty
of the council in each county to
secure the assistance of the sheriffs
in the execution of this plan. The
plan also assumes that members of
the protective groups will be made
secial deputies when called out by
the sheriff. Use of these protective
groups is contemplated only when
called out by the proper authority."
The military plan of the group is
evidenced by the arrangements made
for mobilization. It is stated that
each group shall be composed of men
living in the same neighborhood and
working "in or near the same loca-
tion-for ease of control and speed
of mobilization." The constitution
then goes on to say that the "mobili-
zation of protective groups will be
planned-by 'phone and messenger
for prompt mobilization-and a defi-
nite strong point or area will be as-
signed each group for their defense
during initial mobilization. This
point may be changed as the tactical
situation demands."
Organizations designated by the
constitution of the League as being
"Subversive" and "un-American" are
the American Civil Liberties Union,
which the constitution states is
known to "work untiringly to further
and protect the interests of the Red
movement in all its branches--Red

N1llfi0atio1' Of Law
Is A ttacked By Bales
(Conltiruel from P ccl i)
establishment of wasge boards when-'
ever it should appear that women and
children were being imid imreasonable
and oppressive wages. These boards
were to include three representatives
of employers, three of employes and
three of the general public.
Many observers have criticized the
recent decision on the ground that,
the Adkins case had no bearing on
this present question. Dean Bates
declared that in his opinion that the
New York stat'ite is distinguishable
from the act nullified in the Adkins
case.
The decision in this latter case was
also terined "regrettable" by Dean
Bates.
Although the present case had di-
rect bearing only on women laundry
workers in New York state, Dean
Bates stated that the decision would
in all probability have far-reaching
effect,. "Congress and state legis-
latures and courts will undoubtedly be
influenced by the decision," he said;
''and it will undoubtedly act as a pre-
ventat ive against future legi4lation on
similar Ries.''
Dean 3bates said that the existing
wage laws in other states which are
imilar to the New York law, will
,robably be Fcttled in the courts of
the various states. The Dean stated
that state courts would take their
precedent from this latest decision,
thereby doing away with the neces-
sity of bringing any case into the
United States Supreme Court.
strikes, Atheism, sex-freedom.. di s-
:"" "l'nt ,cdimus 'academic free-
dom,' dioting, etc.," the American
Federation of Teachers, listed asI
"radical, stands for the abolition of
the R.O.T.C., recognition of Russia,"
the Trade Union Liberty League, In-'
ternatIonal Labor Defense, War Re-
sister's League, National Student
League, American League Against
War and Fascism League for Indus-
trial Democracy, Federal Council of
Churches and a number of smaller
organizations.
Investigators have thus far been
unable to learn of any county chap-
ters of the League in Michigan, and
no corporation chartre has been filed
in Lansing. The central organiza-
tion has published no figures indicat-
ing the size of the membership or the
number of chapters in other states,
and at present the League is carrying
on no other activity in Michigan
than the distribution of literature.
- - - - - - - -

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
6:00-WJR Stevenson Sports.
W W,1 'yly son.
WXYZ Easy Aces.
CKLW Omar the Mystic.
G :1.5--WJR Jimmy Allen.
WWJ -Dinner Music.
wxYZ nay in Review.
CKLW Sports and News.
6:3J0-WJR Kate Smith.
wwJ Bulletins.
WXYZ The Lone Ranger.
CKLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45--WJR Boake Carter.
wwJ Rhythm Review.
CKLW Song Recital.
7:00---WJR Cavalcade of America.
WWJ One Man's Family.
WXYZ Folios do Paris.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
7:30---wJR Burns and Allen:
Jacques Renard's Music.
WWJ Wayne King's Music.
wxYZ Lavendar and Old Lace.
CKLW Music Box Review.
8:00-WJR Lily Pons; Andre Kostelanetz'
Music.
WWJ 'rowni IHllTonight.
WXYZ Concert Hour.
CK1UW Variety Revue.
8:30-WJR Strange as It Seems.
CKLW Wallenstein 's Sinfonletta.
8:45---WJR Sports on Parade.
WXYZ Harry Heilman.
9:00--WJR Gang Busters.
WWJ Your Hit Parade.
WXYT Your Hit Parade.
CKLW Husbands and Wives.
9:0 )WJR March of Tine.
CKLW Mart Kenney 's Music.
9:5- -WJ, Rubinoil-Peerce.
CKL W Cbiart oteers.
10:00----W , Duncan Moore.
wwJ Amos and Andy.
WXY"Z LowryClark's Music.
CKLW Scores and News.
10: 15--WJR Baseball Scores.
wwJ Studio Hour.
WXYT Anthony Trini's Music.
CKL.W Lloyd Huntloy's Music.
10:18-- WJR Malcolm W. Bingay.
"My Visit With Governor Landon."
10:30 -WXYZ Ted Weems' Music.
wxYz Anthony Trini.
CKLW MaIl Hallett's Music.
10: 5--WWJ World Peaceways.
. 1:00- -WJR Little Jack Little's Music.
wWJ Troupers.
WXYZ Baker Twins.
CKLW Basil Fomeen's Music.
1.:15 WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Joe Rines' Music.
CKLIW Mystery Lady.
11:30 --WJR Meton Kellem's Music.
WWJ Bob Chester's Music.
WXYZ ~Ltiigi Romanelli's Music.
CK(LW (luy l,omlm-rdo's Music.
11:45 --WJR Meditations.
12:0(}-_.WWJ Russ L~yon's Music.
WXYZ Bert Stock's Music.
CKLW Johnny Lewis' Music.
12:30- CKIW Horace Heidt's Music.
1:00-CKLW Joe Sander's Music.

LOsT AND FOUND
- - --~ _---- - - - --
LOST: Tan home-knit sweater. Rag-
land sleeves. Around Intramural
Bldg. Phone 5575. 531
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 1x
FOR SALE
SALE: Drive home in this comfortable
5-passenger sedan. New tires, bat-
tery, only $100. 1919 Geddes. 532
PEONY bloom for sale. Phone 3926.
1003 Brooks St. 533
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
WANTED: (male, white) Position as
fraternity porter for summer and
fall. Phone 8873. 529
,WHITE lady will take full charge
cooking in fraternity next semester,
references. Box 129. 530
EARN WHILE YOU LEARN: The
"Hoover Insurance & Trust Service"
has a few openings in Detroit and
Michigan which offer an excellent
opportunity to earn while receiving
a thorough practical business train-
ing. Juniors and seniors aspiring to
a business career should write, Da-
vid R. Hoover, 848 Michigan Build-
ing, Detroit. 17x
WANTED
WANTED: A single room with studio
couch, quiet, near Haven Hall.
Graduate student, woman, key ad-
viser. Battle Creek High School.
475
UNFURNISHED modern apartment
wanted for next fall. 3 or 4 rooms.
Young couple. To occupy about
Sept. 1. Box 130. 536

SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and type-
writers. Don't sell before you see
4am. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
WARNING: Only a reliable furrier
can clean your furs and fur coat
without harming the skins. 32
years of expert fur service recom-
mends ZWERDLING'S FUR SHOP
for safe fur cleaning and storage.
Phone 8507. 16x
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Apartment. Southeast
location. Friguidaire and water soft-
ener. Phone 8507. 16x
FOR RENT: Single and double rooms
for girls for the summer term. $16
up. 1511 Washtrnaw. Telephone
3851. 520
NEW four-room furnished apartment
near campus. Accommodates 4.
Shower, 332 East Jefferson. Apart-
ment 4. 535
SUMMER STUDENTS: Light cool
rooms. Special rates. Porter service.
Recreation facilities. The Oaks. 915
Oakland. 7458. 504

Cla ssified IrPe4ley

JILLEL ELECTIONS
The Hillel Foundation will

hold

elections for student president
Thursday, June 11, from 4 to 6 p.m.
at the Foundation. Petitions signed
by 20 members must be presented by'
all would be nominees before that
date, Dr. Heller announced, yester-
day. The elections for vice-president
and secretary will be held next Oc-
tober, he said.
? " R[SRVATIONS
]Jl~ ~\ Any Steame.r or Advertised
r- COMPLETED FRE * HERE
BERMUDA, CALIFORNIA, CHINA, ETC. 'BOOK NOW
Expet Advic... Licensed Slane. 1917. Reference.-Any 11e~ Bank.
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU ANN Aao

NOTICES
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
TYPEWRITERS
New and Used,
Office and por-
table models.
Bought, sold,
Rented, Ex-
changed, cleaned, repaired. Also,
Supplies. Special Rental Rates
to students. Rent may apply in
event of purchase.
O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone 6615

Last Times
Today
at 3:15 and
8:15
GOod Seats still
available for to-
night.
Ian Keith
IAN KEITH
in Shakespeare's
AMLLET"
Opening Tomorrow Night at 8:15!
The Biggest All-Star Cast of the
Season. Blanche Yurka in "the
distaff side" with Estelle Winwood,
Effie Shannon and Margalo Gillmore.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
NIGHTS-75c, $1 and $1.50; MATS. 50c & 75c
Phone 6300
;C -

nice. 1YitIA havetlb
"x pcrlnnee; one vth
i,1nfC nfie det,,IlS Sb
'v 11 yetmAllpreferred.
fll pnrle-,Ia A, sal.ary. $t
422 WVnrld: . .,rtOWfl
'ye it~. BUeMi opema aRe
1nps u mchlna. taxte di
tlon ,rnpidly. (food oppor
'l Y, aLAlae.e, xperTleni'.
e~y. Addr~ess B 8((Iw cc
v.c... a,.,'
*eQ .

it

I

m

MICHIGAN

Now Showing

Did you ever read the want ads
and say "There is the very posi-
tion I would like to have, if I
could fill it." Our instruction
will give you the knowledge
and experience that will fit you
for the niche in life that you
should fill.
HAMILTON
BUSINESSCOLLEGE
William at State Ph. 7831

STARTING TODAY.-
TWO FEATURES
GERTRUDE MICHAEL
GEORGE MURPHY
and
FRANCES FARMER
"TooMany
Pta rents"
-_..,Extra
LATEST NEWS
-------Saturday
WALTER HUSTON
ES

-- Also
MICKEY MOUSE Cartoon

SAM STOLLER
with PAUL TOMPKINS

_ - - _-

ill'1

To

Get A Diploma
in the
JU NE GARGOY LE

I

1,

Do you enjoy playing the piano? Can you
read sheet music rapidly for any length of tine
without tiring? If not, perhaps more light on
the sheet music would help you.
Scientific tests show that good lighting actu-
ally increases the speed of seceig the notes on
the sheet music. It also increases the accuracy
_ '..t _-f ' _t_ A - _I..I- - 4 1 . i fV

GOOD LIGH T A CTS AS A "MAGNIFIER"
Gmusic and provides a generous quantity of re-
flected light for the rest of the room. a ........ I

New I. E. S. lamps are on display at depart-
nent stores, lighting fixture dealers, furniture
stores, and The Detroit Edison Company. And
t--I- - - - ' " --t n- - A -1 - S- 1 -- -

1111

1111,

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