100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

-Ty1 MvTTA arcL

RTDAY, MAY 22, 1r

NEWS
O1f The
DAY

Tragedy At Williams College Claims Two

s,

(From The Associated Press)
La do MenSeek Borah
Aid, Hit Liberty League
The Landon camp extended its right
hand to Senator Borah, its chief
critic, today, and at the same time,
with its left hand sent a jab to the
jaw of the American Liberty League.
The Landon men are expectantly
awaiting Borah's speech May 28, hop-
ing that he will not hit at the Kansas
governor. Speaking of Postmaster-
General Farley's criticism of Landon
at Grand Rapids Wednesday, Repre-
sentative Lambertson, Kansas Repub-
lican declared in Washington yester-
day that he considered his governor
closer to Borah than the American
Liberty League. The, League, Lam-
bertson said, "is the baby of the
Democratic Shouse and Al Smith. It
is the. Landons and the Borahs and
Vandenbergs and Steiwers that are
articulation for the Republican party
today. Not a finger of any of these
four has been touched by the Liberty
League."
Large Air Maneuvers
Start At Self ridge
The largest maneuvers ever under-
taken at Selfridge Field will be begun
today by the First Pursuit Group of
the Army Air Corps. The tactics will
cover a period of two weeks, and, com-
manded by Col. Ralph Royce, 100
enlisted men and 33 officers will take
part.
Oregon Man Admits
Killing Wife
OREGON, Ill., May 21. -(MP) -Guy
M. Tallmadge, 58 year old undertak-;
er's assistant, confessed today, State's
Attorney S. Donald Crowell an-
nounced, that he had fabricated the
story of his wife's slaying at the
hands of a "ragged hold up man" and
admitted killing her because his last
six years of wedded life was "a living
hell."
Held on a murder warrant, issued{
as his 900 word statement was being
taken down by investigators, Tall-
Madge started to "break," the author-
sties said, after he was confronted
with a story told by Mrs. Frances
Birch, 30 year old widow, who as-.
serted he had planned to marry her
and had given her a diamond ring.
Hands Off Egypt
Britain Tells World

Beown Named
SHe Select
Tokyo ele ate
Prof. Everett S. Brown of the polit-
ical science department has received
a letter from the Japan Student As-
sociation, informing him that he
should help in choosing one student
from the University to attend, along
with students from 15 other colleges
in the East and Mid-West, the an-
nual "American-Japan Student Con-
ference."
This year marks the third time
that the convention will be held.
The third conference, which will be
held in Tokyo from August 1 to Au-
gust 8, will be divided into five com-
missicns, enabling the visitors to par-
take in discussions of economics, pol-
itics, culture, religion and natural
science.
Professor Brown said yesterday that
"the general plan is to have a week's
conference in Tokyo, followed by a
three-week tour of Japan. While in
Japan, the delegates will be guests
of the Japan Student Association,
which will take care of all expenses
except laundry and personal expendi-
tures.
"The rail and boat transportation
must; be met by the delegate," Pro-
fessor Brown continued, "but the cost
of the entire trip should amount to
about $400."
All those students interested in
making the trip should get in touch
with Professor Brown immediately, for
the selection of the delegate must
be made shortly.
4IF fT I'TRIANGLES PRESIDENT
Hubert C. Fones, '38E, was elected
president of Triangles, .Junior engi-
neering honorary society, last night
in a special meeting at the Union.
Fones succeeds Robert Beuhler in
this capacity.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
101 discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By Contract, per line -2 lines daily,
one month. ..................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ............8c
2 lines daily, college year...........7c.
4 lines E.O.D.. 2 months.............8c
100 lines used as desired..........9c
300 lines used as desired ............8c
1,000 lines used as desired ..........7c
2,000 lines used as desired ..........6c
The above rates are per reading line
based on eightreading lines per inch
Tonic type, upper and loower case. Add
6e per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
boldrface, upper and lower case. Add
1Oc per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point type.
FOR RENT
SENIOR will share with two seniors,
professional or grad. students, two-
room suite. Summer Session.
Piano. $2.75. Box 127. Mich. Daily.
510
AVAILABLE at end of semester.
Beaalufi[idly furnished suite with pri-
vate lavatory, for instructor or
gradiuate student. Phone 9524.
511
FOR ENT: Suite with private bath
and shower. Continuous hot water.
Also galrage. Dial 8544. 422 E.
Washington. 505
SUMMER STUDENTS: Light cool
rooms. Special rates. Porter serv-
ice. Recreation facilities. The Oaks.
915 Oakland. 7458. 504

Classified mre - o

LAUNDRY_
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
Ca"eful work at low price. 1x
EMPLOYMENT
EARN WHILE YOU LEARN: The
"Hoover Insurance & Trust Service"
has a few openings in Detroit and
Michigan which offer an excellent
opportunity to earn while receiving
a thorough practical business train-
ing. Juniors and seniors aspiring to
a business career should write, Da-
vid R. Hoover, 848 Michigan Build-
ing, Detroit. 17x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: In 2203 Angell Hall: "Europe
Since 1870" by Slosson. Finder
please call Veenboer at 3318. 508
LOST: Green Parker fountain pen.
Finehi. Call 3929. 509
LOST: Schaefer pen; led and black.
At library or vicinity. Return to
Betty Spangler, 383 Jordan. 507
NOTICES
STUDENT TYPING: Expertly done
with reasonable rates. 321 E. Lib-
erty. Apartment 2. 499
ENGLISH house party, limited to
twelve guests. Cambridge (three
weeks' university summer courses
optional). London and near~by
points of interest - Oxford, Shake-
speare country, Canterbury, etc.
Moderate cost. About seven weeks.
July, August. Address Daily Box
123. 463
available at

WA RN1NG: Only a reliable furrier
cali clean your fors and fur coat
without harming the skins. 32
yers of expertl111servicereeom-
mends ZWERDING'S FUR SHOP
for safe fur cleanialg and storage.
Phone 8507. 16x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxopihones and type-
writers. Don'L sell before you see
,qam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our efli-
e cient service. All new cabs. 3x

®'

7

--Assuciated Press Photo.
Robert Paul Henneberry (left), son of a wealthy Chicago manufac-
turer, was shot and killed in his dormitory room at Williams College,
Williamstown, Mass.. by a fellow student, Lewis Jack Somers (right),
19, of Meriden, Conn. Somers, who took his own life, was belived men-
tally deranged from overstudy.
Freshrns fEtGroups, CCC Camps
Problems Of Extension Division

Daily 1:30 to 11 p.m.
15c to 6- 25e after 6
Now
GENE, AUTRY
"Singing cowboy"
--- -- and
RUTH CHATTERTON
"Lady of Secrets"
ONE ENTIRE WEEK
Starts Tomorrow

Corresponidence School Is
Added to Supplement
Regular Work
Two of the most important ques=
tions facing the University extension
divisions of the country were revealed
yesterday by Prof. William D. Hen-'
derson, director of the University of
Michigan Extension Division.
Professor Henderson, who recently
returned from a meeting of the Na-
tional University Extension Associa-
tion where the problems were dis-
cussed, said those questions were how
to deal with the freshman college
groups and with the CCC educational
projects.
The freshman college groups,.which
were first founded in Michigan, were
organized as a result of the depression
in order to give advanced training
to youths who could not afford to
attend a regular college institution.
At present nearly 100 of such groups,
being supported by Federal WPA
funds, are organized within this state;
but only four are under the jurisdic-
tion of the University of Michigan,
the others being supervised by various
educational institutes throughout the
state.
Materials for study are sent through
the Extension Division to the super-
visor of the college group, but no
credit is given by the University for
any work done except after the pas-
sage of an entrance examination or
after the successful completion of
more advanced courses whose prere-
quisites were fulfilled in the college
group.
This year, it was explained, it was1

on May 1. Lesson sheets are sent
out by the University, as are exam-
ination papers, whih are filled out
and returned by the student for cor-
rectior).
Usually this material is not sent
to the individual pupil, but rather to
a supervisor who conducts a "center"
where five to twenty students meet tro
get their material and instruction.
At present Michigan has 40 such "cen-
ters," 15 of which are located in CCC
camps, while only 17 persons are get-
ting their material individually.
The entire "home study" depart-
ment, including the local "centers,"
is financed by Federal WPA fiulds.
Sident fReceives
Pilot Appointineni
Francis L. Wallace, '36E, president
of the Engineering College during the
past year, leaves today for Chicago
to assume a. co-pilot's position with
the United Air Lines.
Wallace, whose home is in Freeport,
Ill., will be placed on duty on planes
going out of Chicago, either on the
eastern route to New York City or
on the western hop to Cheyenne, Wyo.
He holds an unlimited commercial
pilot's license and has more than
1,000 hours at the pilot's controls to
his credit.
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

--l

.4

xperiments Made To Produe
(2 onii'docal -Dab Iia Root S w'au.,t

The production of a sugar from
dahlia roots, which is one and a half
times as sweet as cane sugar, will be
coinnercially feasible in several years,
ai ecording to Leonard A. Delp research
associate in the department of en-
gineering research.
It has been known for several years
that levulose sugar can be produced
from dahlia roots, but it has never
been profitable to do so commercially.
Dr. Delp is now making the process
economically possible by developing
roots which are higher in their sugar
content. This is done by judging the
'desirability of roots according to
their size, sugar content and sturdi-
ness, the judging being done by an-
alyzing several hundred types of roots
in a rather tedious process and mat-
ing the better types.
Since the sugar content of the roots
now varies from three to sixteen per
cent, the object of Mr. Delp's research
is to produce a plant whose roots will
have the highest possible sugar con-
tent. He has also improved and added
several steps in the refining process.
The levulose sugar is not as de-
sirable for a table sugar as it is for
jellies, marmalades, and prepared
desserts, it was further explained. It
will be used as another food product,

being of pleasing taste and having
a high sweetening quality.
The cost of production of dahlias
for use in the making of sugar will
not be sufficiently low until a much
greater acreage has been given to their
cultivation.
The plants are similar to beets in
their action on the soil and in .their
growth, and the syrup will be pro-
duced at a very nominal cost. Only
a few hundred pounds of the sugar
per year are being produced at the
present time because the process is
still in the experimental stage.
Dahlias for the experimental work
are being produced at Portland, Mich.,
Delp said. The seeds are planted in
a greenhouse in April and set out-
doors about Decoration Day, the
plants producing a good cluster of
roots their first year and a better
number the second.
There are other products in the
dahlia and its root which may also be
utilized, according to Delp. These
include a food for live-stock from the
dried roots after the syrup has been
drawn out, an organic calcium com-
pound which is very desirable in bone
growth, and others which have not
been thoroughly investigated as yet.

Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin
told the world flatly today that Eng-
land will stand for no interference
in Egypt and will take a firm stand
against Anti-British sentiment in
Palestine.
Shortly before Sir Thomas W. H.
Inskip, minister of defense coordi-
nation, announced in the House of
Commons that the government is sub-
sidizing extension of private automo-
bile factories to quicken production
of military airtlanes, Baldwin de-
clared Britain "would regard as an
unfriendly act any attempt at inter-
ference" in Egypt. "We intend to dis-
charge our responsibilities to the full"
in Palestine," he said. Arab-Jewish
outbreaks near Jerusalem have re-
cently caused the wounding of three
British soldiers, and a battalion of
English troops is enroute there from
Cairo.
* * *
Harold r. Lh(ler, director of the
International Labor Office in Geneva,
in a report today asserted large scale
preparatijons are being pushed "with'
feverish energy" throughout the_
world.l
Almosi t. fe same time. Winston
Church ill, British statesman, declared1
in the Commions that Germany has
put 4,000,000 unemployed to work#
building munitions or in the army. f
Method s Exibited
A denOustratioi in tili methods of
color photography at 8 p.m. today in
Ronm 2O03 N.S. by Prof.. ;. B. Mainsr
will featire ftwe exhibit being spon-
sored todayv and tomorrow by the bot-
my deartment. The progress in the -
field of color processing in both still.
and motion pictiures of botanical sub-t
jects will be explained.a
Dr. Dow V. Baxter, Dr. Chester A.
Arnold, and Ralph Bennett will alsoa
take part.
The general exhibit is being con--
ducted by members of tle variousA
botanical organizations aid is to be
found in Room 3004 N.S. It shows .
the different ways photography has
been applied to botanical research
and teachi.r Several excellent pic-
torial enlargements of unusual plants
will be on displav. Visitors will .be

found necessary to supplement the 6:00-WJR Stevenson Sports.
freshman college groups with a cor- WWJ Ty Tyson,
WXYZ Key Ring.
respondence school. More than 1,200 CKLW Omar, the Mystic.
persons have enrolled under this 6:15--wJR Jimmy Allen.
WWJ Dinner Music.
"home study" department of the ex- WXYZ Day in Review.
tension division since it was organ- CKLW Joe Gentile.
ized in February, although the num- WJB u Program.
ber of active students was only 705 WXYZ The Lone Raiger
________________________CKLW Rhythm Ranibliui'..
6:45--WJR Boake Carter.
e'uWWJ Rhythm Review.
Pharmacsts Hol CKLW Song Recital.
7:00--WJR Bea Lille: Lennie 1layton's
" Music.
One Da es.1 WWJ Jessica Dragolette:
,IRosario Bou rdonu 's Ensemnble.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
C'KLW -elen.Morn.I
(Continued from Page 1) 7:15 WXYZ R u i roit'rercr.
- ~ ---- - -CKLW Phil-Mar---':KMush'
7:30.....WJR. Broaidwava rot o
tion of the pharmacological properties wx Lou B
in synt heio pl'odlwts offered as sub- CTLWVait vue.
5A110--W~jI' Hollywv.ood 1-lti.
stitutes for herbal essences. WWJ wait. Time.
As a product, of research work hav- CLW Vincent Yu)1' lMu'."'.
ing obvious commercial merit, Dr. 8: ww-- WWXCoin't of lunoa ne R stlow.
Beal mentioned the coffee-flaking CKWX Fred Waring's Peunsylcanias.
process, pressure rolling, designed or- S:- w CKLW MryantField.
9 'DC I,ctAnre KLostelallet", Music.
iginally to prevent loss of aroma and' ' WW,) Richard Hiruor's,('ia oJlioim.
oxidation of the roasted coffee con- W ,""I""dV%
taining imprisoned carbon dioxide. <-K'w wT ,Th
Turning from pharmacy to world WWail(y(rjj.
WXYZ ~Bobl Cliesler' iif.
economics, Prof. Max Handman of CKLW County Chaian.
the economics department in the see- 015 -WJR lit Dates in IHiglory.
WWJ Mischa Kottlci'.
ond talk of the session concluded that 10:00-WJR Dunicanlloo re.
the real motive behind Italy's Etili- WWJ AmIos and Aiich.
WXYZ :Lowry larir's Mus'.
opian conquest is the emotional de- CKLW Baseball Sco'es: Ncw .
sie for nti olal prestige, not ecOO1. I-1015-WJR Rhythm.
WWJ Tiger i igh 0;: elt n og
i plress rc. Mexlodies.
In til e co nc lu liv 1 a d d re ss d' h Ww nk lo
r o" . (I-,w Cr1 fllim;M''e
a ternoon Prof. F'rderick A. Coller 1(131) W.I' it Musi'
of tal e sur ger y depa rt unc' t d iscu ssed W X YZ Aol hun T1,0 l ' M u'v .
ndesia a Anest is' w ,Ie Crawlord
1I1001 -WJ. " ~ranklasters' Mu ic.
Giving sl'horV sidelights on the dis- WW Troupers.
covery of one of the progenitors of WXYZ Bker Twins.
CKlv Al Kavelin's Music.
modern surgery, Dr. Coller outlined 1:15- WWJ Dance Music.
the history of anesthesia and sum- WXYz Sport Grams.
1:;30--WJR Don Bestor's Must i.
marized briefly the properties of an- wwJ Bob Chester's Music.
esthetics now in use. The principal WXYZ Fletcher eder son'sMusic.
CKLW Sophie Tucker's Mush'.
l'ecenlt development in the field, he 111:45-WJR Meditations.
added, is thil application of "basal 12:00--WJR At Close of D
wwJ Russ Lyons' Music-
doses" by injection previous to op- WXYZ Bert Stock's Music.
'iation. when a slight additional l1W Clde:Tras!'sasi.
12::M (1W T,Joe ISder's M ,it.
amo(it of cther sutfices. By this I :00 (2KLW T'I'd Woems' usi:c
pra c er th i entital statd ; r(f the pa- --
tien; is sootlied and lou'e favorable $3 000
operat illg cond ii ions are oldamincd, h j
stated. I ;' ' id 90 a ' ""5 12td , 12
-t --.l-oro mAaArbor. all good

i

I Fr ate n iLy Aluumii
Aid Poet's Widow
HEAFORD JUNCTION, Wis., May
20. - ll')-- A speedy reply to an ap-
peal for financial aid today assured
the widow of Eugene Field, the poet,
that her pictu'esque resort estate
would not he lost through a mort-
gag' foreclosure.
Her sort, Eugenc Field JL, said he
believed his nlother would accept the
"splendid offer" of the New York
alumni chapter of Phi Delta Theta
to advance $3,000 needed to satisfy a
.judgnent against the 155-acre estate.
Mr. Field had invested her savings,
:bilout $60.000, in the place. Field was
a Ph i Delta Theta.
.-Tearing on confirmation of the
loreclosure sale was seheduled for
Satirn'day. The fraternity's offer was
t elegraphed from Philadelphia by J.
I. Mitchell, alumni commissioner of
the ord'er. It came a few hours before
cesso P. Henry. chairman of a civic
co10itt e restoring Field's boyhood
i'ein liii Stee Louis notified the 80'bh
ea +'-old widow, ill with heart disease,
ha i! lite had appealed to President
Roosevelt for aid in her behalf.
Asshtance from the St. Louis group
also was promised, the poet's son said.+

Daily News Viewed
By Large Crowds
More than 10,000 people crowded
into the modernistic new plant of the
Ann Arbor Daily News last night,
eager to see just how a present-day
newspaper is put out, as the Daily
News celebrated its 100th anniversary.
The housewarming last night
marked the great advance the Daily
News has made since it was the Argus
back in 1835. The new building is
one of the most efficient and most
beautiful newspaper plants in the
world. It is complete in every detail,
with an engraving plant, morgue and
all the other necessary departments
of a modern newspaper.
U Engraved $ ,6
Crds & Plates
THE ATHENS PRESS
Printers
CtyLowestPrices n ,Priting.
:3o7 North Main Street - Dial 2-1013

R fnad ltaet t e
j~00ta *t) (fHcopieno iht
v c or Rsalind:
Gregory Rtoto ffTo rbert Mundin
Nigel Bruce- C. Henry oo
.AND A ,CASTOF 10,000:
* IARRYL F. ZAsNVCK
20th Cettry Production F
Presented 6y Jose-phM, Sdheiick
Directed by Fronk 'Lloyd
Assocate, Producer Raymond Grif'fith '
Bsad an the rev:< by Qude
LAST [DAY
L1
I rgV

Worn by Larry (Buster) Crabbe
Only genuine Gantner WIKIIES
have patented Perma-snug waist!
Free-breathing Lastex belt! Self-
adjusting supporter! Quicker-
drying yarns! Smart new weaves!
As Featured in Esquire!
Pencil Welt or Military WIKIES 3.95
De Luxe WIKIES....... .5.00
At better dealers everywhere!
GANTNER & MATTERN CO.
San Francisco 1410 dwy. New York
Makers of Amtericat's Finest Swim Suits

t
t

_______.________..._ ___.___ . ..___ -- .__ a

LET US FILL YOUR
~ PICNIC BASKET
WIT OUR lAGCE VARIETY}
OF DELhCATESS N FOODS
AND SALADS
BRE-AKFAST SPECIALS !
FINCIEON SPECIALS
COMPLETE DINNERS 3
andi a Large Variety of
I OASTED SANDWICHES

Lost Times Today.
at 3;15 and 8:15
"Liel"
with KENNET1'H Mac-
KENNA. Ernest LAW-
FORD. Doris DAL ITON
and George hOMNES.

EFDDWI
G ARR

"I havc seen the ploy both in
New York and Ann Arbor, and I
doubt if Broadway saw a better
production!"
-Thp ptnit Timpc_

i 1 Y

1-c rld, :1,11d r11: oul. olze mile frolla
1-7111'(711 'Piv. 1,.,, - n- ..,.n.,

I

'!1

F/ ;:: x n : l "V/' . -114413 llllf I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan