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May 06, 1936 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-06

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 19 3) 4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

WEDNESDAY, MAY fi, 1~13f~ PAGE FIVE

L.

Mo re

Than 250

Women Are Accepted Forl

Con m ittees

B y

League

Memibers of 4, Weaver Discerns
League GroutpsGeniuns of 'Aice,
Ar'e Aiino unced B lZBT NESN5
"Alic in Wonderland" is completly v
Charltte Rueger ldeports removed from Lewis Carrol's math- c
Very Large Numbher O e f th Engli eatmnt ex- C
Appili inspainel that, in his estimation, the w
_____two were closely connected. n
More than 250 WOmIcII have been Actually, he stated, mathematics u
accepted to work onl various League rise to a high degree of imagination. t
commit tees, according to Charlotte From the abundance of his imagina- P
_Rueger, '37, 'League president. The tion, Lewis Carroll found it easy to o
committees are the social, horse re- draw down the fanciful situations Lz
ception, merit system anld publicity and characterizations of the story. f
groups. It was but natural, he concluded, for
MissRueer aidyesterday th at' Carroll to write his famous, candid p:
shew waseverplasdwthth work rather than a record of a Doe- p:
she* wa vey peasd wth he age tor Jkyle-Mr. Hyde.
number of applications submitted. Satkyf. Both Ault And hld 1
More women have petitioned this year Prastegets etr ftei
are evr bfor, an th comiteesbook is the way it satisfies both the i,
are correspondingly larger. adult and the child. The chil see.; N
The new social committee, headed merely the lighter fancies which are I
by Harriet Heath, '37, is composed of o plasantly treated, whle th adult
the following women: Priscilla Abbot, gt ,gipeo h naigudr
'39, Mary Andrus, '38, Mary Margaret lying it all.
Barnes, '37A, Doris Bolton, '39A, Jean On fPoesrWae' aoie1
Bonstel, 38,Josphie Cvahghpoemns is "Jabberwocky," a seemingly it
'37, Roberta Chissus, '39A, Marcia nonsensical work belovedl by chldren
Connell, '39, Margaret Cram, '39 all over the world. Actually, it is a t
Mary Jane Crowley, '38, Fay Dibble, biight satire on war, playfully re- I
'37, Geil Duflendaek, '38, Jean Drake, vealimg the fighting instinct of the
'39, Agatha Fegert, '7. human race,'he asserted.
Social Commc ittee Namned Another lovely satire, he pointed u,
Armela enln, '8, argret er-I ot, i th stry o HuptyDum t.
guson, '37, Betty Jane Flansburg, '37,Ie quoted the sentence, "When I use aw
Ruth Fowler, '38, Eleanor French, '39, word," Humpty Dumpty said in a o
Ruth Friedman, '38, Janet Fullen- rather scornful tone, it means just
wider, '39, Betty Gatward, '38, Mary what I choose it to mean - neither NA
Gies, '39, Hattibel Grow, '38, Virginia more or less'." Chuckling, Professor l
Handeysidle, '38, Hope Hartwig, '38, Weaver suggested that, in this way,
Barbara Heath, '39, Virginia Jackson, Carroll shows the dogmatist to be e
'38, Barbara Johnson, '38, Helen just an empty shell. a
Johnson; '39. Pauline Kalb, '39, Nancy Croquet Scene Dramaticd
Kover, '38, Kathryn Keeler, '37, Sally Still another great characteriza- 0
Kenny, '38, Janet Lambert, '37, Mar- tion is that of the queen of hearts in
jorie Langenderfer, '37, Gretchen the croquet scene, he explained "She
Lehmann, '37, Marjorie Link, '39, is a perfect queen, a stupid, spunky,
Margaret Lorenz, '39. vicious rascal as she struts around
Mary Loughborough, '39, Dorothy screaming off with his head'."
Luth, '39, Jean MacGregor, '37, Mar- Peraps the reason "Alice In Won-
,jorie Merker, '39, Betty Miller, '37, derland" is so universally enjoyed is
Virginia Nimmo, '37, Stephanie Par- that stated by Professor Weaver. "I o
fet, '39, Janet Pike, '38, Jane Pitcher, love it because it gives me such a per- a
'37, Elizaeth Powers, '38, Mary Red- feet and assured release into the b
den, '3, Jean Rheinfrank, '39, Elea- realm of childhood. Perhaps better t
nor Doxaiis Smith, '39, Priscilla Smith, than any other book in the English f(
38, Hjelen Smithson, '37, Ann Smyth, language, this one carries us back m
'38, Betty Spangler, '39. into the land of fancy where a child c
Louise Sprague, '37, Dorothea Stae- so completely lives." a
bler, '39, Jean Stere, '38A, Irene' Stil- The nearness of a child to the
son, '38, Jane Steiner, '38A, Sybil physical world around him- the an-w
Swartout, '39, Judy Trosper, '37, Helen imals, the flowers, in fact all nature E
Vidok, '37, Betty Walsh, '37, Dorothy is shown, he pointed out, in the way s
Webb, '37, Virginia Weidlei, '38 Alice approaches such creatures as_
Mary Wheat, '39, Betty Whitney, '38, mice and rabbits, in the joy with
Sue Willard, '37, Mary Louise Wi- which she enters a garden of living
toontinulea on rage 6) flowers and even carries on a conver-
'6he 6lizabeth Pillon;
SHOP
Season-End Cl earance
Beg inning Wednesday lasting thru Saturday
S UITS an
DRESSES

Off the OriginalPrice
DRESSES
Darker~ Crepes -- Prints and Knits
Sizes to 46
Vcalues to $29.75
SUITS
All Swggers and Two-piece Tci l leurs
Excepting light pastels.
S ic'akggers to Size 42 - T ail/curs to Size 20
V1alues from $14.95 to $29.75.
Clearance Sale of
Spring Hats
Wednesday through Saturday

Ala theiiualical
In iWonderland'

Collnitteeiieni R~lvisPhuin
Announc I e(]. ~dI 1 1 111 II ")i'-A( I mi LeF

ation with a caterpillar.

The naive

'FiirsI OBVoealioiial
The firsts of the series o1 vocat ional
di. cusstlSti for women to be gi vcI~
his wcek will be held at 3 pIm. today
in the League. The subject of 11w
dilscusĀ°sions will' be "Opport uniti es for
Wome:).n in the Departmentii Store
1' icldi. Personnel work in derutt imn
1:'(,ores will be out lined by Ms Sara
Roiane, director of pei'soniii for the

mianner < nd the fresh .joyousness with
which a child faces life pervades the
ntire book, he explained.
Professor Weaver cieczared that'
Carroll writes 'Alice In Wonderland.'
with the attitude of a mature man
ememberin g childhood. He delight3
is with a perfect fancifulness rather
thani wvith rat ion allity, Professor
Weaver showed. He went on to point
ut thatI obviously, in the preface, it
i;stat ed t hat, the story is toldt merely
for the en ljoyment of children.
But then, he continued, a large
fit of our really great literature
ileases children as xvell as adults.
Gulliver's Travels" was, for a time,
rccognized only as a. childrcn's book,
Js great satiric power not being real-
ied, lie explained. "The Arabian
ights," he stated, is another excel-
lnt example of this.
Aiinials tlscd In Literature
The custom) of using animals in lit-
rature to bring out human traits be-
an, hie explained, with stories told
in India many years before the birth
f Christ. He revealed that these
,ales xwcre related to instruct young
Indian princes.
Aesop was another fictitious person
asing creatures of the animal world
!o show the characteristics of human
eings, he pointed out. His satiric
visdom has, the asserted, become part
f the heritage of all educated people.
A delightful thing about "Alice In
Wonderland" is that it all seems real-
y' to happen, he stated. Professor
Weaver also brought out the fact that
verything follows in logical order
s the story continues helps to keep
,he reader near to Alice in the world
f fancy.
Signia Xi. Members
Some 138 members of the Society
f Sigma Xi, designed to promote
nd recognize scientific research, will
e honored tonight at a banquet in
;e Union. The banquet will mark
r a part of those 138 elevation to a
more advanced standing in the So-
,ity, and for others it will serve as
in initiation.
The speaker for the banquet, which
will begin at 6:30 p.m., will be Dr.
1.C. MacDowell of the Carnegie In-
Litution, Cold Springs Harbor, N. Y.,

Nw, l'lkeeiionieIONOI

Tos e rami l lioli cii
10 SV('UtI II 4)IM('

stylist, will be u mtlined hb Miss Flor
ei' cvaath (Irector of style for
the J. 1'. hhiutson ('U.
Cilis who wish to imeet an.y of the
d :r.iscsion lde ur,.nersonlly shouldi
con >ic fromt) 2 :)0 Ito)3 p.m to the Grand11
the ~lcdiiigof MlredM rhr
':3t, of l lint.
1-ye Glass Frames ,
Repaired.
Lenses Ground.- >
HAILER'S J __tlr
f State Str~eet at Liberty I

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'the guests of the memben, of i ait liven W. be aIt home to the stet The subject, of t raining profr ins
t , f txeI dcv ts Poi 4 to 65 p.m. today. The,,,: in department, stores will be discuwsed
central comnmit tee of the Architects aiidleigradi a e I eas are hieldl the first, by Miss Anne Gletne, direct or of
Ball which will be held May 8 in j tw() eneuvso ee monith. j raining for the J. L. Hudson Co. of
Bar'bourl. Gymnlasium has been an- j l oghals td't re inviteda Detroit. andl merchandiding, partic-
nounced(. a t en, specia11 vii, at~ions have tilairly from the Point of view of a
Bertha Cole, '37, wxill be tbe guest PsLThlaD~l ii, A S im a
of Rober't Morr'is, 1:36A, generial ciir-n Chi.lel i.a 1Deit'a, Chii Oine~a,1
mn.i Other conlinilIftte i and te :h i I 2ii Kppa, snaAlpha ChiOmega,
guests will include Edwaird Dufld,(1 l;ti h ,um ndAlpha Phi. Spec i alIShowingl9of
'36A, who is taking Alice I'Aati hxvs, All t. liwU'ii'' of Ithe social cotn
of ucld, ., nd ichrd tn Iittce !of ta tcwill assist 1)1'.
o ltciOadllbS ick oli M".6. J r ta the affair. The-
nicy, '36A wvhose gutest will be IEvelynvii hoxLaWti'1 '~pr'esidejat, the WII
Hloadley of Montpelier, Ohio. Peggy 1 tllT aroa Z(itr 5i 3. . m
Peterson of Oak Park.11ll., will ac- iu '~ ieI 3,MraeGet IA
compasny IHerbert St evens, '36A and < ad KI Lanr tH A'37
Charles Stocking, '36, who wil have i 'h'~ Lglii ie will form in the
as his guest Eleanor Wright;, '37A. ' wi ro,;):r11 wh. e Dr). and Mrs. .LIIi\ I'(-'Z/ els
William Warwick. Spec., is taking ''ut AK'en will gect the gintescs. Tea I,~,
Marion Gai'ner of Chicago. Jeanette will besexa ill lie dining r'oom. .I ps S!'l
Rhuling, of East Lansing wvho xvill ac- S~ ~ iw'5ai le,\ii(O
company Richard Pollman, '36A and ora(. te i ieales. O ver '200) ;;nests sire ,
Robert May, '36A xwho will have as'; petd.>
h s g et J a i e B r e 37 ,e "9CIt, was announced by M orris that j X(1-I' 'T' ) UN' TYRZV JEW
the entcertainment for the dance this T here xviii be a con:tinuationl of
year will be one of ti~e most unusual , G.P. coi.: a colmmil tee interxviewvs MAY CLEARANCE of
programs ever presented. h~owever, 1 bodaty i' iid ior)ow fromi.3 to 5 :301,
all plans will be kept'secret until pro- p.mn., according, to Maryanina Chock- DARKER STRAWS
sentation. !ey, '37, chaz rnt'.'n of the judiiciary BLACK - BROWN - NAVY
Music for the dance will be fur- c'ou~ncil. Formerly priced up to $7.50
Dished by Jimmy Raschel and his or -_______________
chestra. The theme for the dance is Now
"A World Cruise." The dance floor
will be decorated like a ship with 1,!
hug~e mrt'f.holes arond rithe walls- i ILAI11 SOPPA&-Ad" -*.., _W

I

One Group at
59c

behind which will be scenes of foreign
countries. Life preservers will ben
hung ar'ound the rail of the balcony.j
Costumes woi'n to the dance should3
be either of the type worn on ship
board or native costumes of for'eign
lands. Costumes are not compulsory
for attendence, hoxwever.
All students of the College of Archi-
tecture who have not procured tickets
as yet are urged to do so immediately,
according to Morris, since they are
receiving preference, but the tickets
can not be held indefinitely. The'
price of the (lance is $2.50 a couple.
Tickets may be purchased at Ulrichi,,
Van Bovens, the Union or' from any
of the commiittee members.

ior. Ste I ~,II : ty, abouve Krog('r':;

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ii _ a Jq -u

'q

F'i'y 1iItiti's Y"oii (t(11)( )* 'ter
DWJ

' d l
/.
cn . V yr'
r.,

Ir WILL take~c so little of your
Iime"1 . . . enld so little of your
monley, to mcake. Mot-her happy on

(.09 *

her day! Here arc only
a few suggestions!

(_::

OPQP ,

"(Stifj
} \ f
X~~~r-

live,' yA'liihe
LiIA s Gifts SIw an tWvwlr,
Usec (Ind Iull-l) Like tew.se!**
S -IE MAY IjLmany ime., i a t r-rother,.
luise still will love a gilt to flatter her
fem-ininity. She will praise your good taste
when your gjft comes in our boxy . . . for
we've been mother's favorite store for years.

Handbags
In iiicst leather',and the
larger shapes thatI Mother
hikes best . ,$1,00 and $1.95
Gloves
Falris, trngs fic-nics in
xvlii~ :;' and past els; reds,
green, blacks and navies.
$1.00) and more
Handkerchiefs
The sheerest linen, and all
hand made .. . for only the
best is good enough for
Mother. 29c and more
Necklaces
Pearls are perfect. for Moth-
cr. Hlere are sinigie, double
$ 1.040 and more

Belle-Shuqrmeer
Hosiery
Beautiful, these (, but lui'aei-
cal. Their wearing quafitieslC
are surprising.
: t andMore
Lingerie
Slips and ;;mwnsu, both lace
and tailored - Satin and
crepe, very dalinty and de-
lectable. $1.95 and more
Flowers
How she'll love these gay
costume flowers to aidorn
her favorite dress or coat.
2fc and imp
Clips
A jc ( I ( Ti',c iii in 3rhine-
stoni, s,'LiI iis. $1.t0

I

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