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May 01, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

&GE TW6

~TELL. MTITINXDAT

FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1930

---- _ --

LATE
WVIRE
NEWS
German Military Plane
Crashes; Eleven Dead
BERLIN, May 1.- (Friday) -
(JP) -Eleven persons were killed,
it was reported early today, when
a German military airplane
crashed Tuesday during night air
protection maneuvers at Neu-
Ulm, Bavaria.
Officials here refused to con-
firm or deny the report.
(Th e Exchange - Telegraph
agency's correspondent at Mu-
nich, in a dispatch to London,
said I5 persons were killed in the
crash.
(This account stated the entire
crew of the plane died and that a
number of civilians were killed
when the machine fell on them.)
'Hunger Army' Lifts
Siege At St. Louis
ST. LOUIS, April 30.-- (P)--A
"hunger army" of 36 jobless men
and women abandoned its 48-
hour "siege" of the city hall to-
day after obtaining a pledge St.
Louis unemployed would be fed
during the present relief crisis.
Their dramatic campaign to
emphasize the plight of the needy
ended, however, in only a partial
victory. Their major objective
- increase of the city's monthly
relief appropriation from $147,-
000 to $500,000--was not real-
ized..
Mayor Bernard F. Dickmann
broke the "siege" when he ,ap-
peared before the group and as-
sured them, "No one's going to
starve while I'm mayor."
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

Aydelotte Rated
As Outstanding
College Leader
Swarthmore Placed First
Among Small American
Institutions By Einbree
(Continued from Page 1)
with three other men who later be-
came college presidents - Raymond
Walters, of the University of Cincin-
nati; Day, of Union; and Alan Val-
entine, of the University of Rochester.
Receiving his early education at
Indiana University and Harvard, he
went in 1905 to Oxford as one of the
first Rhodes Scholars. He persuaded
the British to let the Rhodes Scholars
themselves administer the trust in
this country, and put through the
British Parliament the bill which pro-
vided for their selection in eight large
regions rather than by states. He
was mentioned in the House of Com-
mons by Lord H. A. L. Fisher, British
Minister of Education, as the most
distinguished of all the American
Rhodes Scholars.
At the request of Senator Guggen-
heim of Colorado, he drew up the
plans for the present Guggenheim
Foundation by which younger mem-
bers of college facutlies and others
receive considerable stipends for re-
search in the arts, government, liter-
ature, and the sciences. He continues
as the head of the educational group
administering this fund.
Along with Dr. Flexner of New
York, he helped to organize the In-
stitute for Advanced Study at Prince-
ton. For a number of years, he
served as Secretary of the Institute
and he is today a very active trustee.
This institute, financed by the Bam-
berger millions and located in Prince-
ton, N. J., although not a corporate
part of the university, is recognized
as one of the most advanced educa-
tional institutions in the world. It
pays the highest academic salaries
and has a picked body of professors
including Einstein and a choice stu-
dent body.
Dr. Aydelotte, as the representa-
tive of Oxford University in this
country and as the exponent of ex-
ceptionalopportunities for the tal-
ented students, exerts a tremendous
influence on American education. He
has a singularly well balanced mind.
The most striking thing about the
man is his poise and moderation. He
possesses the simplicity and sincerity
of the Quakers, who although a com-
paratively small group of people,
have made a real contribution to the
progress of the world.
Prof. John Dewey
To Attend Dinner
(Continued from Page 1)
University, where he has remained
ever since.
According to Professor Whitney, Dr.
Dewey has always maintained a lively
interest in national and international
politics, and although without official
connection with any party, he is a
spirited independent liberal possess-
ing many views in accordance with
those of the Farmer-Labor Party.
Of the 17 who initiated the organ-
ization of the Schoolmasters' Club,
only four are alive today; Professor
Dewey, Mr. Levi Wines, Ann Arbor
High School instructor, Prof.-Emeri-
tus Joseph H. Drake of the Law
School and Prof. D'Ooge, head of the
Latin department at Michigan State
Normal school.
Continuous 1:30" 11 p..

15c to 6-25c after 6
Last Day
CLAUDE RAINS
"THE CLAIRVOYANT"
and
DICK POWELL
"SHIPMATESFOREVER"
ITomorrowF
CONRAD NAGEL, KAY LINAKER
'GIRL FROM MANDALAY'
- and - -

Accuses Townsend

- Associa ccPire,, Photo.
0. Otto Moore (above), V-7nver
attorney and "star" witneS, told a
housc sub-committee at Los An-
gelcs Dr. Francis E. Townsend re-
fcrred to his old age pension follow-
ers as "old fossils" who "don't know
what it's all about."
Defeat Is S-een
By Fitzgrerald
And Cornstoek
(Contnuedi fron P rage 1)
more intelligent answer regarding his
presidential inclimatiols.
"When that I tlie comes" Senatoi'
Vandenberg wrote, "asuming tihe
Cleveland convention chaves itself,
I have no doubt in my own mind that
you will see a sharp up- turn in the
Republican curve when the first sub-
sequent poll is published. The Re-
publican situation is nec(essarily at a
low ebb at this present diflicult inter-
lude during which no one has a right
to speak for the Republican party,
and everyone knows thiat the Cleve-
land convention must be await ed for
any concrete information respecting
party policies and party leadership."
Asked what Senator Vandenberg
meant by "assuming that the Cleve-
land convention behaves itself," Gov-
ernor Fitzgerald returned promptly:
"That means if they nominate Van-
denberg."
"Do you think the convention will?"
"I think it should," the governor
answered. "It would be a very wise
move, especially as far as Michigan
is concerned."
5 FIREMEN INJURED
DETROIT, April 30. - (11)_:ive
firemen were injured tonight fight-
ing five-alarm fire which destroyed
the three-story Bishop Public School
on Winder Street, on Detroit's near
east side. Most seriously injured
was Floyd J. Tupy, 30, who was hurled
from a fire escape at the third floor
level by an explosion. The other
firemen, less seriously hurt, were Ed-
win Cable, 36; Frank Saunders, 42,
Rudolph E. Rahn, 38, and Harry
Burt, a 16-year-old Negro boy, John
Starks, was struck by a flying brick.
M CH IGA N
VEOVE AT --
FIRST FIGHT! Should
t ey marryin hate and
1ive scrap pily' ever
,after?-

Congress Can
Reglahte Court
Says Dr. Mairtig
(Contil cf- age 1)
cessful in dismissing the case, and
the Court concluded that it could not
"proceed to pronounce judgment in
this case, for it no longer has jur-
isdiction of the appeal, and judicial
duty is not less fitly performed by
declining ungranted jurisdiction than
in exercising firmly that which the
Constitution and the laws confer."
Three conclusions which may be
reached after a study of these cases.
in the opinion of Dr. Martig, are:
.) The Supreme Court may ex-
ercise only such appellate .iurisdict ion
as Congress, by affirmative act, has
given it.
2) Congress, by repealing the act
conferring the appella ife jurisdiction,
can deprive the Court of such juris-
dietion.
3) The Cour-t will not, inquire into
the motives of the legislature but will
inquire only into the power, and
Ihat Ihe power to make exceptions to
the appellate jurisdiction of the
Court is one expressly granted to
Con ress in the Cons itution.
New Reveflues
Sotit AsrTax
Bill FlsShort
WASIIN(TON, April 30. (4')
A warning from Secretary Morgen--
thau that the (louse t ax bill fell short
of the revenue asked by President
Roosevelt today started the Senate
Finance Committee on a search for
new levies to raise $337,000,000.
The search was initiated after the
treasury chief submitted to the co-
mittee a surprise figure -- a forecast
that the Federal deficit for the fiscal
year ending two months hence would
reach the peace-time record smash-
ing figure of $5,966,000,000. He in-
timated the total would include the
full cost of prepayment of the sol-
diers' bonus.

MAC'S TAXI-

-4289. Try our effi-1

NOTICES
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
TIIh sConvene
are Fior lert my
(C(on tminned from la 'e l)I
effeet. Two of the five speakers
warned of a serioius i helier shortage
in their fields, those of rural and
elementary education, if teachers
t raied for secondary instruction were
not allowed to flow back into the
lower fields to supply the shortage,
as this interchange of personnel would
be prohibited without additional
I'ainitng.
A program of special interest is of-
ferel in the Music division, wit h band
clinics conducted with the Clayton
High School Band and the South-
eastern Michigan High School Band,
with a concert by the latter at 7:45
p.m. in Hill Auditorium.

cient service. All new cabs.

3x

SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and type-
writers. Don't sell before you see
sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. 10x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 1x
LOST AND FOUND

WILL the person Avho lift my raini-
coat frcm 229 A.H. kindly call 4493.
I don't mind gettng soaked but the
coat has value as a gift. Reward:
two (2) beers and no questions
asked. 453

WILL party who took lady's bag by
mistake from 2 p.m. Ann Arbor bus
on April 13, please return or com-
municate with Eastern Michigan
Motorbuses, Ann Arbor, 116 W.
Huron.
LOST: A blue leather pocket book
containing two tickets to Baltimore,
a leather wallet and ten dollars.
Will be glad to give the cash for
the return of the wallet, tickets and
purse. Call 2-2591. Edith Hooker.
WILL finder of Illinois wrist watch,
lost in second floor Union lavatory,1
please return same to owner. High-
ly cherished. Liberal reward. Ben-
jamin. 3582. 452

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Ad vertis:inT Dcpartment. Phone 2-1214.
The classiftied columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box' numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five ave rage words to line)
for one or Ovo ins-ert ions. loc per' read-
ing line for three or more insertfins.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 1) per readting line
for two or more insrtions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
1O' discount if paid within teni days
from the date of las iserion.
By Contract, per line-2ines;daily,
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4 lines EO.D., 2 months............8e
2 lines daily, college year ...........7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 muonths.............Be
100 lines used as desired ..........9?c
300 lines used as desired.... .Be.8
1.000 lines use-d as desired ..........7c
2,000 lines used as desired......6c
'rhe above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch
Ionic type, tipper and lower cat e. Add
6Ic per line to above rat es for a ll cap1i tal
letters. Add 6e per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates arc for 71,z point type.

CLASSIFIEDADVERTISING

I -

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Hi!

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS-

While ini Ainn Arbor, drop iin and look over
our selection of CAMERAS, PHOTOGRAPH-
IC SUPPLIES and CARDS for Every occasion.
We are prepared to DEVELOP and ENLARGE

all kinds of Films.

6:00-WJR Jimmie Stevenson.
WWJ Ty Tryson.
WXYZ Harry Richman.
CKLW Omar, the Mystic.
6:15-WJR Jimmy Allen.
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Sophisticated Rhythm.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30--WJR Musical Program.
wwJ Bulletins: Missing Persons.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45-WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Rhythm Review.
WXYZ Musical Moments.
CKLW Song Recital.
7:00-WJR Lennie Hayton's Music.
WWJ Jessica Dragonette:
Rosario Bourdon's Ensemble.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
7:15-WXYZ Southern Gentleman.
7:30-WJR Broadway Varieties.
WXYZ The Lone Ranger.
CKLW Variety Revue.
8:0O0-WJR Hollywood Hotel.
WWJ Waltz Time.
WXYZ Music Guild.
CKLW Witchtes Tales.
8:30-WWJ Court of Human Relations.
WXYZ Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians.
CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
9:00--WJR Andre Kostelanetz' Music.
WWJ Richard Himber's Champions.
WXYZ Roy Shields' Music.
CKLW Evening Serenade.
9:15-CKLW Cesare Sodero Directs.
9:30-WJR March of Time.
WWJ Marion TPalley: Orch.
WXYZ Bob Chester's Music.
9:45-WJR Hot Dates in History.
WWJ Arno and Woodenda.
10:00-WJR Runcan Moore.
WWJ Amos and An dv.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
CKLW Baseball Scores: News.
10:15-WJR Rhythm.
WWJ Tiger Highlights: Evening
Melodies.
WXYZ Sammy Diebert's Music.
CKLW Freddie Martin's Music.
10:30-WJR Latin Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Sid Austin's Music.
CKLW Kay Kyser's Music.
10:45--WWJ Jesse Crawford.
WXYZ Emil Coleman's Music.
11:00--WJR Derby Eve Broadcast.
WWJ Troupers.
WX3' W Baker 'Twmns.
CKLWN Dick Static's Music.
11:1,---WWJ Dance Muie.
WXYZ Sport Grams.
11:30- WJR Don Bestor's Music.
WWJ BJbC Cheter's Music.
WXYI Eart Iioes' Music.
CKLW Jack Hylt's Music.
11 :45-W,1£. Medtations.
12:00---WJR Tam Jock Kaufman's.Music.
WW JRusSLnd's Music.
WXYZ Bzert Stock's Music.
CKI W Clyde 'Wrack's Music.
12;30- -WJR at Close of Day.
CKLW Jloe Sander's Music.
1 :00--KLW Ted Weenms' Music.
1 :15-CKLW Joe Sander's Music.

A Large Variety of
HT WEATHER
SPECIALS
at REASONABLE
PRICES
Kruger's
KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
Restaurant
233 . State At Head of Liberty

FRANCISCO.6& BOYCE

719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

Just a Few Steps West of Hill Auditorium.

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11111

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mm

MAJESTIC
ONE ENTIRE WEEK
Starts Tomorrow

hiow

on

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JAMES CAGNEY
"FRISCO KID"

pp

If you lose something, let people know
about it. Blow your horn ! No one will
blow it for you. The best place to sound
off for the return of Lost Articles is the
Michigan Daily Classified Section.
39c CALL 24214 or
Is a slila'lprice O fc
to recover arti- STOP IN at the Office
les you prize 420 Maynard St.
highly.

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The 1936

DRAMATIC SEASON

May 18 thru June 20

Ian Keith
Season TWickets NOW ON SALE at the
Garden Room of the Michigan League
building - at $3.00, $3.60, $4.80, and
rNa In ~Ctuie cht-drn es V A R TVi

Carl aermelrsn.
d LOMBARD
in FAITH BALDWIN'S
LOVE BEFORE
BREAKFAST

Ad.,IpbZtko. ptetenh
SYLVI1A SIDNEY
FRED MACMURRA
HENRY FONDA
"TheTRAIL OFTHE
lONESOME PINE"
LAST TIMES TODAY

"

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