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April 30, 1936 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-30

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TWO

HII MICHI XN DA~TTI

~- THURSDAY, APRiL 30, 1926

- I

Hits Townsend Graft

LATE
WIRE
NEWS

Senator's Missing Wife *
Believed Found
LONDON, April 29.-(P)-A
woman who gave the name of
"Mrs. Draper" and whose de-
scriptio'n was believed to tally
with that of the missing wife of
Eben S. Draper, a former State
Senator of Massachusetts, stowed
away on the steamer Georgic
during its Atlantic crossing from
New York and was not found un-
til today, ships officers disclosed
tonight.
Mrs. Eben S. Draper, 42, dis-
appeared from a sanitarium at
Katonah, N. Y., April 19. On a
blotter in a hotel room in which
she later stayed was found the
name of the Georgic. Today
Draper announced he had re-
ceived a cablegram from his
wife, sent from the Georgic in
London.
Officers of the liner said Mrs.
Draper emerged today from a
tank room on the promenade
deck and disembarked here. One
officer said she "went ashore
with a friend."
Merit System
Is Supported
Governor

(Continued from Page 1)
ashamed of the conditions of pat-
ronage existing the first few months
I was on this job," Governor Fitz-
gerald asserted that "the only way
to handle personnel of state admin-
istration is through a systen other
than by selection by political prefer-
ence. All I heard the first few months
as governor was jobs. That has got
to be corrected. The patronage sys-
tem as it exists today will ruin any
official and any government. The
issue is neither Republican nor Dem-
ocratic, but one of sound common
sense."
The cost of government "must be
cut," declared Comstock, who told the
meeting that "if there is anything
one humble citizen can do to secure
passage of this bill, you can count
on former-Governor Comstock."
Civil service is needed, according to
Johnson, "to put the right kind of
business efficiency into government."
He said Professor Pollock's efforts
here are "attracting nation-wide at-
tention."
Battle Not Finished
Professor Pollock, referring to the
proposed institution of civil service
in Michigan as a "revolutionary
change," urged "100 per cent sup-
port for the measure. The battle
is not finished yet," he said.
The association chose George A.
Osborne, editor of the Sault Ste.
Marie Evening News and son 'of
former-Governor Chase S. Osborne,
as its presidenL Other officers in-
clude Mrs. P. W. Jones of Grand Rap-
ids, president of the Women Voters
League of Michigan., first vice-presi-
dent; Arno R. Schorer of Kalamazoo,
second vice-president; John W. Miner
of Jackson, treasurer; and William
P. Lovett, secretary of the Detroit
Citizens' League, secretary.
An organization committee, which
will meet Saturday in the Union in
Ann Arbor to choose a state com-
mittee of 50 members and an execu-
tive committee of 15, is composed of
G. I. Nippress, Saginaw educator,
chairman; Dr. D. C. Shilling of West-
ern State Teachers College; D. A. Van
Buskirk of Hastings, president of the
Michigan Educational Association;
and Mrs. Harry E. Applegate of Lan-
sing.
Measure Will Pass
Professor Pollock was more than
pleased with the meetings. He
termed it the "best thing that has
yet happened for civil service in Mich-
igan." Monday he will conduct a
hearing in Saginaw and Wednesday
a hearing in Escanaba, in the Upper
Peninsula.
There seems to be little doubt, sen-
timent in the capitkl indicates, that
the civil service measure which Pro-
fessor Pollock's commission is pre-
paring, will pass the legislature. Gov-
ernor Fitzgerald said today he hoped
it would become law within the first
30 days of the session. But what
troubles members of the commission
and those who are working for them
is that individual legislators may in-
sist on apparently inconsequential
amendments that may throw off the
effectiveness of the entire system.

-Associated Press Photo.
Jack T. Leasia (above), dismissed
manager of the Townsend old age
pension organization in Michigan,
told a congressional investigation.
at Detroit he had been warned by
a "higher up" not to push his work
too fast because "we want to milk
this crowd two more years"
Lindberghs Seek
Peace In England
LONDON, April 29. -(P) - Col.
and Mrs. Charles A. Lindbergh, who
suddenly left France today after fail-
ing to secure privacy from autograph
seekers, landed at Folkestone tonight.
They drove away in their automo-
bile for an unannounced destina-
tion, believed to be their temporary
home, Long Barn, at Weald, Kent.
The couple had been touring
France for six days by automobile,
spending most of their time in small
villages. They were not recognized
until today in a seaside resort near
Boulogne. After the flier and his
wife went, for a stroll on the beach a
crowd followed them back to the
hotel begging autographs, so they
hurriedly packed and left.
RADIO
6:00-WJR Jimmie Stevenson.
WXYZ EasyyAces.
WWJ Ty Tyson.
CKLW Omar the Mystic.
6:15-WJR Jimmy Allen.
WWJ The Human Side of News.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30--WJR Kate Smith.
WWJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45-WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Red Horse Ranch.
WXYZ Clyde McCoy.
CKLWL Song Recital.
7:00-WJR Alexander Gray:
Mark Warnow's Music.
WWJ Rudy Vallee's Variety
Hour.
WXYZ Pittsburgh Symphony
Orchestra.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
7:30-WJR HarryRichmuan.
CKLW Little Symphony.
7 :45-WJR Musical Program.
8 :00-WJR Water O'Keefe:
Glen Gray's Music.
WWJ The Showboat.
WXYZ Death Valley Days.
CKLW Pop Concert.
8:30-WJR Ed Wynn: Gulliver
the 'raveler.
WXYZ Rhythm Review.
CKLW Melody Treasure Hunt.
8 :45--WXYZ Bob Chester's Music.
9:00---WJR Horace Heidt's Brigadiers.
WWJ Bing Crosby: Jimmy Dorsey's
Music.
WXYZ Big Broadcast.
CKLW Recital Hal.
9:30--WJR March of Time.
WXYZ Adventures of the Hornet.
CKLW Hugo Mariani's Cosmopolitans.
9 :45-WJR Musical Moments.1
10:00-WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Sammy Diebert's Music. t
CKLW Baseball scores and News.
10:15-WJR Rhythm.
WWJ Tiger Highlights: Evening t
Melodies.
WXYZ Sid Austin's Music.
CKLW Kay Kyser's Music.t
10 :30-WJR Songs You Remember.
WXYZ International Petroleum Con-
vention.
CKLW Freddy Martin's Music-.
10:45-WWJ Jesse Crawford.
11:00-WJR Abe Lyman's Music.
WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
CKLW Orville Knapp's Music.
11:30-WJR Henry King's Music.k
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZDBaker Twins.
CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
11:45-WJR Solay and his Violin.
12:00-WXYZ Sam Jack Kaufman's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
CKLW Bob Nolan's Music.
12:30-WJR At Close of Day.
CKLW Joe Sander's Music.
1 :00-,CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
HEARST APPEALS TO COURT
WASHINGTON, April 29. - (IP) -
William Randolph Hearst appealed
to the District of Columbia Circuit
Court of Appeals today his suit seek-
ing to enjoin the Senate Lobby Com-
mittee from seizing his private tele-
grams.
Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio
Instructions i n a 1
forms, Classical, social,
dancing. Ph. 9695.
Wuerth Theatre Bldg.

Two Prominent
Women Bridge
Players Held
Operation Of Duplicate
Bridge Tourney Brings
Gambling Law Charges
NEW YORK, April 29. -UP)- In a
courtroom crowded with anxious
bridge enthusiasts, two prominent
women players were arraigned today
on a charge of violating the gambling
laws in connection with the operation
of a duplicate bridge tournament.
The anxiety of the spectators was
traced to a fear that the police de-
partment might be contemplating a
wide-scale offensive against the nu-
merous bridge clubs in the city.
Discussing yesterday's raid on a
midtown studio, which led to today's
court hearing, Police Commissioner
Lewis J. Valentine said:
"That was nothing more than a
gambling house. You can gamble
with bridge just as you can with
poker, black jack or fan tan. Any
club that violates the law is subject
to police action.''
The two women taken in the raid
were Miss Mildred Lovejoy, 34, who
lives in the studio apartment with
her mother, and Mrs.Adelaide Neu-
wirt, 35. Both have a following as
bridge teachers and tournament play-
ers.
After pleading not guilty they were
paroled for trial in special sessions
by Magistrate Anthony F. Burke
A few hours after the bridge club
raid, members of the police gambling
squad visited a charity ball in a mid-
town hotel and a power game in an
uptown pent house. Nine men were
arrested at the charity ball, and 10
women and six men at the pent
house. All but one woman were dis-
charged in the latter case.
Commenting outside of court on
the case, Oswald Jacoby, a member
of the Four Aces championship team,
remarked:
"Duplicate bridge might be con-
sidered a form of insanity by non-
bridge players and policemen, but it
isn't gambling by any stretch of the
imagination."
Kansas Profs Average
High'C In Student Poll
LAWRENCE, Kans., April 29. - UP)
-In a recent "Grade Your Profs"
campaign sponsored by the Daily
Kansan, the average grade for all of
the professors voted upon was slight-
ly above "C." Over 170 professors
received grades and only 80 of them
had an average of "B" or better.
Twenty-eight had an average of "D"
and eight flunked completely.
Most of the instructors received
their lowest grades in personal ap-
pearance, with personality running
second.
As a punitive measure, it is under-
stood thatnthe closing hour of faculty
homes will be set up an hour earlier.
Eyston Sets World
Diesel Car Record
BONNEVILLE SALT FLATS, Utah,
April 29.-() -Capt. George Ey-
ston, steel-nerved English speedster,
set a new world's mark for diesel-
poweredmotor cars of 158.87 miles'
an hour in an unannounced run to-
day.
The previous unofficial record for
the measured mile in diesel-motored
cars, according to AAA officials who
timed Eyston today, was 136 miles
an hour.r
The record-smashing sprint in the
Britisher's 3-ton Juggernaut -"fly-

ing Spray" - came as a surprise after;
several test spins and during a lull+
between rainstorms that left the
While Saline Flats sticky.

NOTICES
ONE THIRD OFF on all fur work.
E. L. Greenbaum, 448 Spring Street.
Phone 9625. 14x
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
MAC'S TAXI---4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and type-
writers. Don't sell before you see
dam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
LAUNDRY

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gl pss, lair of pink-gold
full-vue glasses. Last in nleig hbotr-
howd of Michigan 'Theatr e. Call
MiDhigan Daily, Box 121. 446
LOST: Wlite gold ring, black onyx
diamond s Pjin, Friday, April 24th
at Music School. Peward. Box 122.
448
LOST: Brown zip)er brief case con
taining equity law notes and state_-
inents. R-waId for reti rnI of otes.r
Call 2-1817, . ET Konopka. No
questions asked.
LOST: A blue leatir p; ket book
c(ntaining wo tic lkes to Baltinore,
a leatherw allet and ein dollars.
Will be glad to g ive he cash for
the return o.(f the wallet, ickets and
purse. Call 2-2591. Edith Hooker,
WILL party who look lady's bag by
mistake from 2 p.m. Ann Arbor bus
on April 13, please return or com-
municate with Eastern Michigan
Motor buses, Ann Arbor, 116 W.
Huron.
LOST: $15. Wedinesdlay bet.ween ha-
ven Hall and Main Street and
League. Reward. Phone 3203.

Hundreds of single and married people are getting
their Spring cash from us--on their own signatures
-why don't you? You get the cash without delay.
The payments are arranged to suit you and you can
have a year or longer to repay. Use this personal
money service. Add up your Spring needs and see us
NOW.
Loans Up to $300 --- 30 Months to Repay!
Second Floor Room 208
WOLVERINE BLDG. (formerly Ypsi-Ann Bldg.)
Ph. 4000-4001 202 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor
PERSONAL FINANCE CO.
In Spring Fashions, with or without the button-down collar ... the
A R ROW OX FOR D SH IR T
in the Latest Patterns at
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY
4 rExs &40

Classified Directory

S P R I N G N E E DS

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

darned
lx

WANTED
WANTED: Young man to wait on
table for board. Call 4039. 447

1936 Floods Written In Cycles
Of Weather, Geologists Find

Scientists Present Remedy
To Hold Back Torrents
Of Great Watersheds
By HOWARD W. BLAKESLEE
(Associated Press Science Editor)
Ithaca, N. Y., April 29. - (P) -En-
gineers say there are "50-year" floods,
"100-year," "500-year" and "1,000-
year." This they find from marks on
the lands about rivers.
This spring's floods in northeastern
United States may qualify under 50-
year" levels, possibly even the "100
year" sort.
To geologists there is no mystery
in why they come, no doubt they will
return. They are written in seasonal
combinations and weather cycles well
authenticated, though seldom read
by the public.
There is also a remedy within man's
control, structures and means to hold
back the waters on the watersheds
where they gather. Scientifically this
remedy is simple. Practically it is dif-
ficulty and expensive.
Traces Flood Development
Typical events of the present floods
are observed by O. D. von Engeln,
professor of geology, Cornell Univer-
sity. These occurred in central New
York, near the geographical center of
the floods and one of the hardest hit
spots.
Central New York, furthermore,
had a curtain-raiser last July in
which the geologists were able to
measure more exactly than hereto-
fore just what may be expected in
present-day communities.
"The basic cause of most destruc-
tive floods," Professor von Engeln
says, "is unduly concentrated rain-
fall. In the middle latitudes such
concentration results from the de-
velopment of cyclonic storms and
their failure to move from west to
east or from southwest to northeast
as is normal.
Streams Overburdened
"Maintained over one area four to
seven days with constant precipita-
tion, these storms furnish streams so
much water their channels cannot
carry it off, and floods result.
"In the present flood these condi-
tions are aggravated by a snow cover
and frozen ground. Everything be-
comes surface run-off, immediately
delivered to the streams.
"These floods are most directly and
Made to Look
Like New Again I

disastrously destructive Io 11 um an
tructures -- buildings, bridges, roads,
railway tracks. All such additions to
the lands( ape by man aie very inse-
curely attached to the earth. A com-
paratively snail I d}epart ire from nor-
rnlal c'ondi tions, and they are wrecked,
Flood In 1935
"The flood of July, 1935, and the
preserit floods in centsr;A New York
attained such high stages that they
modified natural cond i ions that have
been stable for 50, lys'rhaps 100 or
more, years.
"It is interesting that within nine
months there should be two such
great concentrations, when for years
no such excess has been experienced.
This short-term recurrence indicates
the sporadic and coincidental nature
of floods.
"It is possible that our entrance
in the last few yeatrs of the 17-year
wet-and-cool period of the 35-year
'Bruckner Cycle' may have sonie bear-
ing on these extremes.
Great Damage
"The great permanent damage of
such floods is the vast soil erosion.
The waters hold so much silt and clay
as to be liquid mud --- fields and soil
fertility floating away.
"Here again it is human activity-
cultivationoof the land - that makes
the natural situation unduly unstable.
"The remedies now being applied
by the government in soil conserva-
tion work are admirable," Prof. von
Engel says. "But a larger effort
should be placed on providing reser-
voirs with outlets permitting normal
Ilow to go through but, if a flood flow
comes, holding it and the soil."
MIC H I GA N
LOVE ,AT
FIRST FIGHT! Sho61d
they marry in hate and
;live scrap pily ever

F OR

Ad

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Continuous 1:30- 11 p.m.

DOWNTOWN - Next to Wuerth Theatre
The Foremost Clothiers in Wash tenaw County

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15c to 6 -25c after 6
NOW
Claude Rains
Fay Wray
"The Clairvoyant"
and
DICK POWELL
RUBY KEELER
"SH IPMATES
FOREVER"
Extra
CARTOON * NEWS

X \ 1
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t-

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MAJESTIC

Today and Tomorrow
DOUBLE FEATURES

IT'S TOO LATE FOR
KID GLOVES!
The forces of law and order
are at death grips with the
underworldf. THE WORD
HAS DONE OUT TO

F .

" Every time clothes
cleaned their freshness

are
and

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a. rr
_.._-
I1

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-- - - I

*1

Miller's Dairy FarmStores
1219 S. University 620 E. Liberty
A REAL MEAL

color are restored. Don't
neglect your clothes until
Mr. Moth damages your
things beyond repair. Phone
8722 today for a positive
cure to all moth threats.
P~.8722
""' ;"i''''.

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Carl Laemmle presents
LOMBARD
in FAITH BALDWIN'S
LOVE BEFORE
BREAKFAST

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TYPEWRITERS
New and Used,
Office and por-

1 -A gripping chapter in
-our great war on crime
i PRESTON FOSTER
,MARGARET CALLAAN

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D L A IA IA

Alan Mowbray, Ralph

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