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April 26, 1936 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOU

THE MICHICAN DAILY

5i 'N3YARTI-,19

Philadelphia Orchestra

Will

Play

He re

A,

Festivl 1

Uor
' 1

I
.Firs I

Time

I

iFounded 1900 !1 e( -ogdI F xpla'isl4E
F i *i
To Encourage Fstival Numbers
Classic M i1 a (Continued from Page 3)
legacy of hundreds of years of op-i
pression of his country by more pow- 1
Grown Fr-om Modest Body erful nations.
To Concert InsLruntent In all the world, particularly in1
. . aAmerica, he is known best by his1
Of 100 Musician "Finlandia." His great symphoniesc
and the violin concerto on their pro-
Stokowski Leads
Magnetic Director Subject
Of Administration And
A Figure Of Interest
Philadelphia is justly proud of its
great orchestra, which will participate
in the Ann Arbor May Festival, May
13, 14, 15, 16. Founded in 1900 "to
encourage the performance of first
class orchestral music in the City of
Philadelphia," it has grown from a
modest body of players to a concert_ _
instrument of the first rank, com-
posed of one hundred virtuoso musi-
cians under the leadership of Leopold
Stokowski.
Incorporated under the laws of
Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Or-
chestra Association is controlled by
an association of subscribers to the
Philadelphia concerts, and thus is ax
democratic organization. The orches-
tra has an endowment fund of nearly
two million dollars subscribed by 14,-
000 citizens of Philadelphia in
t umOUntS ranging from one dollar tow
a hundred thousand.
Adtdiistered By Board
The affairs of the organization are.
adinurstered by a Board of Directors,
and folowing the formation of the
Association on May 17, 1901, the
post of President was filled by Alex-
ander Van Rensselaer who continued t
in office until his death in 1933. __________________
During its first season six perform-
ances were given. The present sea- JULiUS HUEHN, Metropo
son, the thirty-sixth, extending from Opera Baritone, in local debt
October 4, 1935 to April 11, 1936, con-
sists, of 28 consecutive pairs of con-
certs which will be given in Phila-
delphia in the Friday and Saturday
series. A Tuesday Evening series
consists of 10 events, and there are
three Concerts for Youth, conducted
by Mr. Stokowski for audiences which
he limits rigidly in age from thirteen
to twenty-five..~
There is an out of town schedule
which takes the Orchestra to Wash-
ington and Baltimore for four con-
certs each; eight concerts are played
in New York City. Touring, for some
years past and until this season has
been curtailed to allow the maxi-
mum number of performances to be.
given in Philadelphia. rnd..ed
Three Have Conuted
There have been three conductors
of the Philadelphia Orchestra: Fritz
Scheel who was with it at the be-
ginning and held the post for seven
years: Carl Pohlig, who at Fritz
Scheel's death left the position of
First Conductor at Stuttgart to fill "k
the vacancy in America and Leopold
Stokowski who took over the leader-
ship in 1912 and brought the organi-
zation to its present high standing.
From the day that he took up the
baton to direct the musical destinies HAROLD BAUER,
of the Philadelphia Orchestra, his
magnetism, virility, unflagging devo- Pianist
tion and eclectic taste have made him
a figure of interest and the subject
of admiration in the musical life
of not only America, but of all the
world.
During his tenth season with the
Philadelphia Orchestra, Leopold Sto-
kowski was given the Philadelphia
Award of ten thousand dollars as the
man whose accomplishments had
during that year, "advanced the best
and largest interests of the cam-
munity of which Philadelphia is the Mc
Gave American Premieres

Notable "first American perform-
ances" by the Philadelphia Orchestra
include Mahler's Eighth Symphony
- the "Symphony of a Thousand"-
given with orchestra, soloists and
chorus with such effectiveness that,
instead of the three performances
originally planned, nine were even-
tually given, including one in New
York which packed the Metropolitan
Opera House from pit to dome.
O thirs were Rachmaninoff's "The'
> 'us": stravinsky's "Le Chant du
Ros.ignol" and "Sacre du Prin- )
i~mps"; "Alpensymphonie" by Rich-
ird Strmiss; Schelling's "A Victory
Wll": Skryabin's "Le Divin Poeme";
:chotnberg's "Die Gluckliche Hand"
and numerous others. -
Every artist of distinction in the
nu1ical world has appeared as solo-
ist with the Philadelphia Orchestra,
and' the guest conductors number
scii distinguished musicians as Rich-
ard Strauss, Alfrede Casella, Georges
Enes Io, gor Stravinsky, Vincent
(lIndy, Willem Mengelberg, Frederick
Scock, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Otterine
Rspighi, Arturo Toscanini, Fritz :v >
R {iter. Sir Thomas Beecham and
oh is equally renowned.
Musically much of the orchestra's
success must be attributed to the
cl mice of the first conductor, Fritz a.
Scheel- who during the summer of

grams prove him to be greatest in all{
the large forms of composition.
Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto
This magnificent concerto is known,
for some unknown reason, as the
"Emperor." Certainly it is the most
imnia nnirm ~~ rc fna

music in existence.
of the most vigorous and healthy
Beethoven's 1st Symphony
Beethoven's first symphony was
written in 1800, when he was thirty
years of age. This symphony pos-
sesses all the charm and classic

i
I
i

gentleman characterized it as "con- of the mnust ' riki characters in uljs bird w 11.se eaers blaze with
fused explosions of a presumptuous Mozart's a;rOl ad in ihis aria she gid and siery shllteQ, whose eyes
effontry of a young man." sings what is perhans 1he must dilli- shine like crystal, and who dwells
Lily Pons' Arias cult of all coloratura i Its ex- in a golden cage. In the depth of
treme range calls fur a voice of extra- the night it flies into a garden and
The "tour de force" of Friday
night's program is Mozart's aria, "The ordinary and imarnpesachle tech- lights it up as brilliantly as a thou-
Queen of the Night" from the "Magic nique. sand bu rnin firese. It feeds upon
Flute." The opera was written in Stavi iSky"is.fl1 ' ,gldesapltes ywich have the power
1791, only two months before Mozart's The "Fire tiru" wvas Straviisky's
death. Mozart received no financial first work written by Serge Iiagli- lo hear te Philadelphia Sym1-
reward for his efforts. The profits all ibeff, director of the Russian Ballet. phony under the baton of Mr. Sto-
went to the writer of the libretto, It was first performed at the Paris xkowski in this stunning composition,
Emanuel Schikanede. Opera. June 25, 1910. is one of the "experiences" in the con-
The "Queen of the Night" is one The story it reveals tells of a mirac- cent hall today.

f

im~posig ana commaain~g oBeet- beauty of a Mozart symphony, and
hoven's five concerti for the piano. at the same time reveals, in portions,
The fusion of virtuosity and crea- the more virile and prophetic voice
Live inspiration is remarkable in this of the mature Beethoven. In the
work. It is brilliant and scintillating, light of Beethoven's greatest works,
delicate and almost mystic in places. this symphony's reception by a Leip-
The last movement contains some zig critic in 1801 is interesting. They

1

SIX
CONCERTS

May

13, 14,1,16

FOUR

crI . .

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI, Conductor

SAUL CASTON and CHARLES O'CONNELL, Associate Conductors

THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
THE YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
JUVA HIGBEE, Conductor

-'s1
itan
ut.

i "'

Soloists

Choral Works

LILY PONS

Soprano

CARACTACUS......
MANZONI REQUIEM

ELGAR
VERDI

t -"--

JEANNETTE VREELAND Soprano

ROSE BAMPTON.

Contralto

GIOVANNI MARTINELLI
PAUL ALTHOUSE.
KEITH FALKNER.
JULIUS HUEHN
EFREM ZIMBALIST

I Tenor
Tenor
Baritone
Baritone
Violinist
Pianist
Organist

HAROLD

BAUER

CHILDREN AT BETHLEHEM
PIERNE
SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS
I. WEDNESDAY 8:30 P.M.
II. THURSDAY 8:30 P.M.
III. FRIDAY 2:30 P.M.
IV. FRIDAY . 8:30 P.M.
V. SATURDAY 2:30 P.M.
VI. SATURDAY 8:30 P.M.
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
AT THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
At a later date unsold season tickets, if any, will
be placed on sale at $1.50 - $2.00 - $2.50 for
individual concerts. Mail orders with remittance
will be given preference in sequence.

PALMER CHRISTIAN

I

Season Tickets - Six Concerts
$6.00 - $7.00 - $8.00
If Festival Coupon from Season Choral Union
Ticket is returned, the prices are reduced to
$3.00 - $4.00 - $5.00.

T
a

LILY PONS, Soprano, who will be heard Friday evening.

irea testMusic Ivent

-- {

________________________________________________

TICKET SCHEDULE
Season Tickets - Six Concerts - $6. - $7. - $8.
(If Festival Coupon from Season Choral Union Ticket is returned, the
prices are reduced to $3. - $4. - $5.
ORDERS FOR TICKETS, with remittance to cover, will be filed and
selections will be made in sequence. Tickets will be mailed out about
May 1, at purchasers' risks, unless additional fee of 18 cents for legis-
tration accompanies order. Please address CHARLES A. SINK, Pres.

.i _ -

'A- - I-.

Overm-the -Counter Sale
of Single Coneert I lkets

:.:.:: :}: ;{:L: {]}i iii.J'r} iI }: }}}: II

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