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April 25, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-25

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Tiliv MICHIGAN IDAIVy

SATURDAY. APRIL 25. 1l."

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Y

LATE
WIRE
NEWS

Federal MenReported
On Trail Of Alvin Karpis
BOSTON, April 24.- P-)
Agents of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation returned here today
after a mysterious expedition, re-
ported in search of Alvin Karpis,
Public Enemy No. 1.
Seven agents, heavily armed,
left suddenly this morning on an
undisclosed mission. On their re-
turn they refused to comment
upon the report Karpis had been
seen in this vicinity.
Lindberghs Bound
For Italy, Rumors Say
NICE, France, April 24.-(I)--
Col. and Mrs. Charles A. Lind-
bergh were reported in American
circles tonight to be enroute to
Alassio, Italian riviera, where
they were said to have rented a
villa.
A couple arrived quietly in
France yesterday from England
aboard a British freighter, bring-
ing their own automobile.
Father's Illness Sends
'Schoolboy' To Eldorado
ST. LOUIS, April 24.- (A)-
Lynwood (Schoolboy) Rowe, De-
troit Tiger pitcher, left tonight
for Eldorado, Ark., after receiving
a telephone call saying his father
was gravely ill there.
Rowe was to have pitched for
the Tigers against the White Sox
at Chicago tomorrow. Manager
Mike Cochrane indicated he
would start Roxie Lawson, in-
stead Rowe was uncertain how
long he would be away from the
club.
Hillel Spring Dance
Will Be Held May 2
The Annual spring dance of the
Hillel Foundation, featuring the mu-
sic of Al Cowan's Orchestra, will be
held from 9 p.m. to 12 midnight, Sat-
urday, May 2, at the Women's Ath-
letic Building, Palmer Field.
Tickets, which will be $1 per
couple, are being distributed by Ruth
Friedman, '38, Al Middelman, '38.

Spring Parley
Hits Expulsion
Of 3 Students
Moore Chides Engineers
For Total Lack Of 'Social
Consciousness'
(Continued from Page 1)
gell of the sociology department de-
clared that even if this were so, he
believed Hitler "meant to use the
Heidelberg invitations as propaganda
to gain acceptance for his ideals."
'Communists Useful'
The question of the ousted stu-
dents was brought up when Max
Wonder, '36E, asked Professor Slos-
son for his opinion of the "status of
the case." When Professor Slosson
returned that "communists are use-
ful in the student body," Wonder de-
clared he thought the students were
requested to leave, not because they
were communists but they violated a
University ruling on handbill ped-
dling.
The engineering students came in
for their panning when Prof. A. D.
Moore of the electrical engineering
department, head mentor of the en-
gineering college, declared himself
against engineers in government and
said he did not think engineering
students should be expected to be
skilled in the social sciences.
A definite religious angle to many
of the questions, tas urged yesterday
by President Ruthven, was noticeable.
The Rev. Charles W. Brashares and
Prof. Leroy Waterman of the orien-
tal languages and literatures depart-
ment handled most of the religious
discussion, and agreed that "religion
must be social."

Su

dden Paralytic Stroke Ends Mitchell Assails
H. J. Abbott's Story (areer I)isregard Fotr
S -3 --* i* 1)

(Continued from Paae )
staunch Democrat, and Rep. Pren-
tiss M. Brown of St. Ignace.
A Loyal Democrat
Mr. Abbott gained the reputation
in both state and national political
circles as a fighting Democrat who
refused to concede defeat. He was a
regular party man through the days
when the Democratic party in Mich-
igan was struggling to survive at the
turn of the century to the period of
the Roosevelt landslide in 1932. A
member of the State central com-
mittee since 1910, he held various of-
fices in the party and was postmas-
ter here for several years.
When former-Governor William A.
Comstock resigned the chairmanship
of the State central committee in
1924, Mr. Abbott succeeded him, later
following Mr. Comstock as national
committeeman from Michigan in
1928.
Friends In Both Parties
Mr. Abbott, always very personable,
had as many Republicans as Demo-
crats among his friends. "Having
so many acquaintances of the op-
posite political faith is sometimes
embarassing," he once remarked.
Mr. Abbott was closely allied with
Comstock throughout the long strug-
gle of the Michigan Democrats, al-
though he was reported to be luke
warm toward the former-governor at
the end of his administration. He ar-
dently supported President Roosevelt,
but although his warm support for
the Democratic party continued, he
rather passively accepted the New
Deal.I
From the time that Postmaster
General James A. Farley took over
the post of patronage distributor ex-

traordinary, almost to the presentI
day, Mr. Abbott was chief Michigan
Democrat. His high opposition as
State representative of the Admin-
istration even overshadowed that of
Comstock when he was governor.
In Patronage Row
But however amicable Mr. Ab-
bott's relations with his political col-
leagues may have been before 1933,
from that date he was a storm cen-I
ter of squabbles, despite the fact he
remained in the saddle. When he
took for himself the choice post of
collector of internal revenue of De-
troit, such a tide of protest surged
up that he was finally forced to drop
it. Charges, very pointed but never
substantiated, were made that mem-
bers of the Abbott staff forced cam-
paign contributions from leading in-
dustrialists.
His chief opponents were the
Michigan Democrats in Congress,
who, there being no Democratic sen-
ator from this state, thought they
should have some say in patronage
distribution. And it was charged
that this dissention, in which he was
backed by both Farley and Comstock,
was in large measure responsible for
the Republican victory here in 1934.
During the past six months, Mr. Ab-
bott and Prof. John H. Muyskens of
the speech department became em-
broiled in a political fight. The pro-
fessor announced his candidacy for
the Democratic senatorial nomina-
tion, on an anti-Abbott platform,
and he charged that Abbott deserted
his party in 1934, voting for Gover-
nor Fitzgerald after caipaigning for
Judge Arthur Lacy of Detroit, Dem-
ocratic gubernatorial nominee.

j i ciiai neviewI

tontinued from Page 1)

message to Congress concerning the
Guffey Coal Act, in which Congress
was urged to pass the bill "regardless
of its constitutionality" as an illus-
tration of the Administration's un -
democratic disregard for our "con-
stitutional form of government."
In spite of these obstructions, Mr.
Mitchell stated, 14 important acts of
Congress during the Roosevelt regimel
have been declared unconstitutional,
an "all-time high." The fallacy in
these laws, he continued, lies in their
formation on principles of "social wel-
fare" rather than on constitutionality.'
Court Status Proper
"Discontented and chagrined by
these adverse decisions," the admin-
istration has sought "devious meth-
ods" to establish the permanence of
these laws and side-step the Supreme
Court, he said. Included among these
methods, in the opinion of Mr. Mit-
chell, are proposals for "allowing Su-
preme Court minorities to override
majorities" through two-thirds or
three-fourths majority decision re-
quirements, for requiring all tests to
be brought about within six months
of the passage of the acts; and for
limiting the power of lower Federal
courts.
None of these methods are likely
to be successful, he believes, for they
are no more than a "tampering" of
our judicial review system, and the
only "forthright, honest way of deal-
ing with the problem" is by con-
stitutional amendment.

TYPING
8c Typing 8c
Phone 7728
Apt. B5 Anberay Apts.
434
NOTICES
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and type-
writers. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. 10x
LAUNJ1DRY

ALAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

Classified DirecEtory

darned
lx

EMPLOYMENT
JOB WANTED: Cook, experienced in
fraternity and sorority cooking
wants position for next school year.
Also wants summer work. Excel-
lent references. Box 120. 441

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Seven-room house, large
living room, fireplace. lots of closet
space. Finished attic, all conven-
iences, garage, shrubs, flowers, fruit
trees, off main highway. Must be
seen to be appreciated. Phone 3606.
Owner. 437
FOR SALE: Bungalow with large lot
140 frontage, fruit trees, and berry
bushes. Excellent well, garage. Off
main highway. Phone 3606. Owner.
438
FOR RENT
FURNISHED APARTMENT on short
term lease. Phone 8327 for ap-
pointment. Ralph T. Swezey. 442
CHI PHI
Chi Phi fraternity announces the
election of the following officers:
Robert Owen, '37, president; Wayne
Andrae, '37, vice-president; John
Moser, '38, secretary, Carl Johnson,
'38E, warden; and Stewart VanKeur-
en, '38, historian.
MICHIGAN_
*MAR",IE r
Coming Suntay----
LOY, HARLOW and GABLE in
"WIFE vs. SECRETARY"
MAJESTIC
FOUR DAYS ONLY
Starts Today
A DOZEN SINGING FOOLS IN A
WHIRL OF LAUGHS AND GIRLS!
The most sensational line-up of
assorted entertainment talent
ever combined in a single
picture-even by Warner Bros.?

'A'

Continuous 1:30 - 11 p.m.

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

FISK JUBILEE SINGERS
Sponsored by the Benjamin House and the Dunbar Civic Center
Will Present a Program of NEGRO SPIRITUALS on
Sunday, April 26th
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre 4 P.M. and 8:15 P.M.
TICKETS 50c and 75c
at Wahr's Bookstore, Box Office or Call 3219 or 7784

15c to 6--25c after 6
Now Playing
URSALA PARROT'S
"NEXT TIME WE
LOVE"
- with
MARGARET SULLAVAN
"BR ILLIANT
MARRIAGE"
Joan Marsh, Ray Walker

6:00-WJR Jimmie Stevenson.
WWJ Ty Tyson.
WXYZ Jesse Crawford.
6:15-WJR News of Youth.
WWJ Dinner Music.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30-WJR Musicale.
WWJ Press-Radio: Soloist.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45-WVJ Religion in the News.
WJR Musical Masters.
WXYZ Don Orlando.
CKLW Song Recital.
7 :00-'WJR Carefree Capers.
WWJ Concert Orchestra.
WXYZ Town Talk.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
7:15-WWJ Edwin C. Hill.
WXYZ Cavaliers.
WJBK Transcription.
7 :30--WJR West Branch Trout
Festival.
WWJ George Kavanagh's Music.
WXYZ Musical Moments.
CKLW "Sherlock Holmes."
7:45-WXYZ "Sandlotters."
WWJ Sports Celebrities.
WJBK Gernet Case.
8:00-WJR "Ziegfeld Follies of the Air."
WWJ "Your Hit Parade.'
WXYZ Sid Austin's Music.
CKLW Oklahoma Bob Albright.
8:15-WXYZ Boston Symphony Orchestra.

8 :30-CKLW Cincinnati Symphony
Orchestra.
9 :00--WJR Nine Martini:
Andre Kostelanetz' Music.
WWJ Frank Fray.
WXYZ Bert Stock's Music.
9 :15-WVXYZ Rhythm Review.
9:30-WJR Rhythm Review.
WWJ Orchestra: Guest Stars.
WXYZ Barn Dance.
9:45-WJR Stoopnagle and Budd.
10:000-WJR Jefferson Day Dinner.
CKLLW Jefferson Day Dinner.
10:30-WWJ Celebrity Night.
WXYZ Jefferson Day Dinner.
11:00-WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
11:15-WXYZ Baker Twins.
WJR Rackets Expose.
CKLW Kay Kyser's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Dance Music.
CKLW Joe Sanders' Music.
11:45-WJR Henry King's Music.
WXYZ 400 Club. -
12:00 -WJR Sam Jack Kaufman's
Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
wXYZ Carefree Carnival.
CKLW Basil Foreen's Music.
12:30-WJR Bernie Cummin's Music.
CKLW Johnny Johnson's Music.
WXYZ Veloz and Yolanda.
1:00-CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
1:30-CKLW Al Kavelin's Music.
2:00-CKLW Ted Weems' Music.

I

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GAS'RAN1GE
VIlSE6 ~pTOUtES __
JTgode 1?1e%3blee
pendablea Ihe 1)urn i P
1esare eb
l ateni
ro~.d. excellent aid.
.D Su Aures
ovnIa t . ea'$eT
to aSi'ng e°o. an
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a at1Cy vxa rr fnd
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modrn e o cea-1Sa1
att- OPauo
No n~eed c rdeau. gave
1 a odern inrn any ,4w

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This is the Sight Meter,
the clever new instru.
ment that measureslight,
and tells you how much
you need for any task.

v

STUDYING OR READING under poor light will injure your
eyes. Let us help you preserve your eyesight by sending you
a Sight Meter. By means of the "electric eye," this instrument
measures the amount of light in a room as accurately as a
thermometer measures heat.
Recent surveys show that not one home in ten is lighted
according to the minimum standards necessary to preserve eye-
sight. Poor lighting is responsible to a large degree for the
astounding prevalence of defective eyesight! Four out of ten col-
lege students suffer the handicap of impaired vision. There are
no substitutes for the services of an eyesight specialist, but good
lighting helps to protect eyes, good and bad, young and old.
It will help you to do better work, more easily and quickly.
You can measure your lighting with a Sight Meter. That is
the only way to know definitely whether or not your lighting
is adequate. There is no charge of any kind for Sight Meter
service. Call the Detroit Edison office.
THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY

1'

A

Asta Tb
1
des
Selected Short Sbjct
Big Doble FatureAttrcios
s NwEe no. 1f-
Including
N~ Low*et Si
Addied
Selected Short Subjects
-1Coming Wednesday i
Big Double Feature Attractions:
FEATURE No. 1-
IRVIN S. COBB

_

h.

During The Old Stove
Round-Up

$20.00
Allowance For Your

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