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March 27, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r TWO

TI1~MiAS DATIN

)rRIDAY, MARCh 27, 1939

v -_---- ----- ..._ _---------- .. .. .--- ------ --_.. ... --

Townsend-ism'
Shown To Be
140 Years Old
Thomas Paine's Writings
Advocate Plan Of Old
Age Pensions
(Continued from Page ')
will furnish the rising generation with
means to prevent their becoming poor.
"It is the practice of what has un-
justly obtained the name of civiliza-
tion to make some provision for
persons becoming poor or wretched
only at the time they become so.
Would it not, even as a matter of ec-
onomy, be far better to devise means
to prevent their becoming poor? This
can best be done by making every
person, when arrived at the age of 21
years, an inheritor of something to
begin with."
Proceeding from the young man or
woman .just come of age, Paine esti-
mated for that person a life expec-
tancy of at least 30 more years, or
an average longevity of about 50
years. Thus the property inherited
at 21 would be bequeathed usually
at the age of 50, resulting in a turn-
over of the national wealth in a cycle
of 30 years.
On this basis, he maintained, when
the older generation reached an age
of 50, either that older generation or
the generation coming of age must
beedeprived of its means of support.
This he proposed to remedy by his
"old age spension"
Paine then computed from figures
on the wealth of England used by
William Pitt for an income tax
scheme in his 1796 budget that an
inheritance tax should obtain an
annual fund of 5,666,666 pounds
sterling. Of this, four million pounds
would be expended on the old age
pament, and 1,350,000 pounds for
the "birthright" of persons reaching
their majority.
The remainder of 316,000 pounds
would care for the "blind and lame
totally incapable of earning a liveli-
hood" at the same rate as the aged.
Bishop Speaks
On Preparation
For Librarians
The important part played in mod-
ern society by the librarian ws em-
phasized by Dr. William W. Bishop,
librarian of the University, in a talk
given yesterday in Angell Hall. The
talk was one of the vocational series
being sponsored by the Literary Col-
lege for all undergraduate students
planning to enter a profession.
The work of the librarian, Dr. Bish-
op said, is highly specialized, and re-
quires a great deal of preparation.
The backbone of the librarian's work,
he said, is a knowledge of books, their
use and their servicing, but, he added,
there is practically no experience
which cannot be of value, since he
must be able through his knowledge
tosatisfy an immense variety of
needs.
The activities of the librarian have
been greatly extended in recent years,
said Dr. Bishop, and especially into
the field of adult education. At all
of the leading schools discussed by Dr.
Bishop, special training as a librarian
requires a two-year period of study,
taken after the student has obtained
his degree.
The most important requirements
for admission into the courses for
librarians at the University, he said,
are a degree and a reading knowledge
of French and German. A high scho-
larship standing is also required.

The next professional lecture will
be given by Prof. R. B. Rodkey of the
School of Business Administration on
Tuesday, April 2.

Ohio River Starts Second Serious Rampage

Clnssifi H
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405 - --__ -
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
LOST AND FOUND buy old and new suits and over-
LOST: Green fountain pen, a Parker, coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
on Tuesday between Mosher-Jordan prices for saxophones and typewrit-
and the Daily. Call Jane Bierly, ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
558 Jordan. Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
LOST: Small diamond in ring. Prob- lox
ably in Library or League or be- LAUNDRY
tween. Call 194 Jordan. 407 --~~
-.-------- ----- -- LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
LOST: Men's Bedford wrist watch, Careful work at low price. ix
brown strap. Call 6740, Lester
Weiss. 400 WANTED
LOST: Women's oxford glasses. WANTED: Furnished rooms or apart-
Finder please call D-42 Lawyers mont near campus. 2 or 3 per-
Club. 401 sons. Write Box 117 immediately.
EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

DIE FROM GAS FUMIES and a fourth was near death in St.
WARREN, Ohio, March 26-~-( P)-- Joseph's hospital. The dead were
Three persons were found dead from Mr. and Mrs. Sam Carter, both about
gas fumes in their home here today 1 58, and Mrs. Catherine Forrest, 73.
We carry a complete line of Hadley Watch Bracelets
HALLER'S JEW ELRY
FINE WATCH REPAIRING
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY

IS

WBflRT

WIRI STS

, ; 5---"

Wry

Your Jeweler
cant show you
'ist Watch Bracelets
by.g \
HADLEY \
- but we suggest that you first se
for our illustrated folder, "Sma
Wrists." This gives you an idea+
Staunton what is new and correct in Wat

-Associated Press Photo.
While residents tf the upper Ohio valley were attempting to clean
up debris left by the recent disastrous floods, the Ohio river started a
second rampage that threatened to inundate the devastated towns again.
A customer is shown .eing carried to a water-bound Louisville, Ky., tap-
rcom, which did business as usual despite the flood.
Students In 1859 Were Thrilled
By Six-Piece ' Iniverset Band'

nd
art
of
.ch

Pictures Reveal Contrasts
In History Of Michigan's
'Fighting Hundred'
When Michigan s "Fighting Hun-
dred" march down State Street the
stirring strains of "Varsity" can thrill
the followers of the band no more
than Michigan's six-piece "University
Band" must have thrilled the students
back in 1859.
A collection of pictures on the walls
of the rehearsal room in Morris Hall
reveal striking contrasts in each stage
of the band's development, the most
important evidence of its early history
being an old sepia photograph of "Les
Sans Souci-University Band," show-
ing six men with instruments not now
used except in concert bands, but
which were common until long after
the Civil War.
Much of the early data on the band
has been lost over the long period it
has been alive, but it is known the
band began to play at football games,
according to one history, as far back
as 1897, though still entirely a student
organization partially recognized by
the athletic association.
It was in 1913 that the Varsity Band
first gained official recognition and
became a unit of the University. It
was in that year that George Olsen,
'13-'14, first tossed a broomstick over
the cross-bar on the gridiron, inaug-
urating a stunt that every band in the
country follows today.
In return for the University's finan-
cial support, the band was expected
to furnish music at all football and
baseball games and to furnish music
at all general University occasions,
such as the Convocation, the Regents'
Reception, and at Commencement.
From 1897 to 1899 the band made
a number of out-of-town trips, to
Detroit, Grand Rapids and Chicago.
Probably the latter was the longest
trip until 1914 when the bandsmen
made the journey to Harvard which
caused the praises of Michigan to be
sung all over the East.
Today's Varsity Band numbers 100
members and the drum-major and a
staff of a dozen men. From the old
-- - NOW

days when rehearsals were held in
haphazard locations - Ann Arbor
High School, Harris Hall, University
Hall, the fencing and boxing room
of Waterman Gym, over Calkins' drug
Store, and downtown in the rooms
of the Washtenaw Times Building-
the band has been elevated to the
position of occupying its own quarters
in Morris Hall.
Paralleling the University's growth,
this huge military and concert organ-
ization is a startling contrast to the
unpretentious six-man band of 1859.
with its two violins, two flutes, a gui-
tar, and a. 'cello. Today's "Fighting
Hundred" carries the 77-year-old
name as proudly as a veteran organ-
ization should the boasts of such an
imposing record not only among the
men and women of Michigan, but
among the thousands who have heard
it since its inception over three-quar-
ters of a century ago.
Danger Of Gas In
Wartine Ridiculed
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., March 26. -
Professors B. S. Hopkins and L. P.
Audrieth of the chemistry depart-
ment of the University of Illinois
have ridiculed the idea that gas is a
big factor in modern methods of
warfare.
They point out that only 2.3 per
cent of those persons injured by the
effects of gas in the World War suc-
cumbed. It has also been proved
that people who have recovered from
poison gas are less susceptible to
pneumonia.

6:00--WJR Buck Rogers.
wwJ Ty Tyson.
wXYZ Contrast in Music.
CKLW Omar.
6:15 --WJR Junior Nurse Corps.
wWJ Dinner Music,
WXYZ Sophisticated Rhythm.
CKLW Joe Gentile..
6 :30---WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Melody Lane.
6:45---WJR Hot Dates in History.
WW-J Musical Moments.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CK.LW Old Bill.
7:00--WJR Myrt and Marge.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Harry Richman.
CKLW Shadows on the Clock.
7:15--Jimmie Allen.
wW Speakers: Evening
Melodies.
wXYz Capt. 'Tim's Adventure
Club.
7:30 --WJR Jack Randolph.
W.XYZ Lone Ranger.
CKLW variety Revue.
7:45 -WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Royalists.
8:00--WJR Freddie Rich's Music.
WWJJessica Draonette.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
CKLW Ch'arioteers.
8:15_WXYz Wendell Hall.
CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
8:30--WJR Broadway Varieties.
WXYZ Red Nichols' Music:
CKLW Pop Concert.
9:00-WJR Hollywood Hotel.
WWJ Waltz rTime.
WXYZ Al Pearce's Gang.
CKLW Revellers: Orchestra.
9:30--WWJ Court of Human Relations.
WXY Frec Waring's Pennsylvanians,
CKLW Music Box Revue.
10:00--WWJ Richard Himber's Champions.
WWJ First Nighter.
WXYZ Girl Friends.
CKLW Serenade.
10:15-WXYZ Musical Moments.
CKLW Cesare Sodero Presents.
10:30-WJR March of Time.
WWJ Music Guild.
WXYZ Adventures of the Hornet.
10:45- WJ Musical Moments.
11 00--WJR Bulletins.
WWJ Bureau of Missing Persons:
Troupers.
WXYZBaker Twins.
CKLW Hockey Review.

11 :15- WJR Latin-American Music.
WWJ snort Celebrities.
WXYZ Sportgrams.
11:30- -WWJ Kavanagh's Music.
CKLW Jack IHylton's Music.
WX YZ I,owrv Clark's :Music.
11:45- WJR Meditation -
WXYZ Henry Biagini's Music.
12:00 --WJR Barney Rapp'; Music.
WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
CKLW Ted Fio-Rito's Music.
12:30--WJR Guy Lomnbardlo's Music.
WXYZi Phil Levant's Music.
CKLW Will Osborne's Music.
1:00--CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
Walter B. Rea Sp eaks At
Banquet I1111t. (elleiets
Walter B. Rea, assistant dean of
men, spoke at a banquet last night
given by the University of Michigan
Club of Mt. Clements. His subject
concerned his contacts with under-
graduates in serving as assistant
(lean, ill which capacity he gives out
driving permits to students, enforces
the auto ban and has charge of fi-
nances in such student activities as
the class dances, the J.G.P., and the
numerous honorary societies.
I--- -- ------- -- --_

HA DNLE
COMPANY. I

Y PROVIDENCE - R *I .
N C -New York " Chicago " Los Angeles
N * Toronto*Canadae *London *"England *

Bracelets for Men and Women - and
will aid you greatly in making the
proper selection to complete your
watCh ensemble.

WRIST WATCH BRACELETS EXCLUSIVELY - SINCE 1912

---

-1

We handle the complete lie of Watch BracCIets
for both men and women by HADLEY. Come
in and inspcCt our stock,
cArcade Jewelry Shop
CARLF. BY

COLLEGE and
FRATERNITY JEWELRY

HIGH GRADE WATCH and
JEWELRY REPAIRING.
ENGRAVING

Kruger's
DELICATESSEN
Restaurant
233 S. State At Head of Liberty
Sanid ay Specials
ROAST LONG ISLAND
DUCKLING AND
CHICKEN DINNERS
MEALS for the
PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
will be served from
April 7th to April 14th

I

Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classified Ads.

I

ONE ENTIRE WEEK - Starting Tomorrow!
THE EVENT YOU HAVE WAITED
FOUR YEARS TO SEE !

11

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ards& Plates.65
THE ATHENS PRESS
'Printers
City's Lowest Prices on Printing.
308 North Main Street - Dial 2-1013

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Think a Minute!I
EverybodY Reading The
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