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February 20, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THV TIXTi-,V

THURSDAY. rrRRrARV %.fi- 1-4

1

Excursions For
Summer Term
Are Announced
Niagara Falls, Put In-Bay,
Detroit Industries Are
Listed On Schedule
Eight points of interest in and
about Michigan, including Niagara
Falls, Put-in-Bay, and many of De-
troit's outstanding industries, are in-
cluded in the annual Summer Session
excursions for 1936, it was announced
:,esterday by Prof. Louis A. Hopkins,
director of the session.
The first excursion, to be held July
2, will be conducted in Ann Arbor,
where buildings and property of the
University will be pointed out to stu-
dents who are not acquainted with
the campus.
An inspection of the various Ford
industries in River Rouge will be un-
dertaken by the second and fourth
excursions on July 6 and 15, exclus-
ively.
The Detroit Institute of Arts, the
Detroit Public Library, Belle Isle, the
Fisher Building, Broadcasting Station
WJR, and the Detroit Zoological Gar-
dens will be inspected by the patrons
of the third excursion on July 11.
The fifth excursion, which will last
two and one half days, will be a visit
to Niagara Falls and vicinity con-
ducted by Prof. Irving D. Scott of the
geology department on July 17.
Greenfield Village, containing
Ford's Village, the Museum of Early
American Life, Edison's Menlo Park
Lt,,boratory and the Dearborn Inn,
Will be inspected on July 22 by pa-
trons of the sixth excursion. This
excursion will be duplicated July 29.
On July 25, an excursion will be
conducted to the General Motors
proving grounds and laboratories at
Milford.
An inspection of the Cranbrook
Schools in Bloomfield Hills will com-
prise the ninth excursion.
The excursion to Put-in-Bay, the
last of the session, will include a trip
to an island in Lake Erie, where the
party will view Perry's Monument,
and other points of geologic and
scenic interest. This excursion will
be conducted by Professor Scott on
August 5.

Kills Nazi Leader

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Student Body Of 7 Members
Awakened By Tolling Of Bells

[_CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

-Associated Press Photo
David Frankfurter (above),
medical student and son of a Yugo
slavian Rabbi, admitted he she
and killed the Swiss Nazi leade
Wilhelm Gustloff, at Davos, Swi
zerland, "because he was a Na
agent."
Aigler Discusses
Ti cket Tax Cas
(Continued from Page 1)

Days Of 1841 Recalled
In Article In Vichigan,
Alu in i
By ROBERT WEEKS
Bells are often considered an in-
tegral part of any school system and
their use in controlling student ac-
tivities in Ann Arbor dates back to
September, 1841 when Patrick Kelly,
the University's first janitor, awak-
ened the student body of six fresh-
men and one sophomore with a large
bell mounted on a pole in the center
of the campus.I
This first bell was subject to un-
dergraduate pranks for twenty years;
it was hidden several times, muffled,
and some ingenious members of the
Class of 1863 turned it upside down
and filled it with water which they
allowed to freeze before returning it
to its usual mounting. The last prank
cracked it and it was replaced by an-
other bell which was used until the
installation of the present peal now
contained in the tower near the en-
gineering shops.
This peal was originally housed in
the two towers of the old library
which stood where the General Li-
brary now stands. They were select-
ed for the old library when it was
built in 1883, and according to an ar-
ticle on this peal in the Michigan
Alumnus, of all musical instruments
a group of bells is probably the most
difficult to select. The sound of a
bell consists of not less than six in-
dividual tones more or less distinct
to an acute and cultivated ear, and
the quality of the note emitted de-
pends on the harmonic adjustment;
of these several tones. The bells were
cast in Troy, N. Y., and a professor
of the School of Music who attended
the final inspection stated that they
Student Opinions
Shown In Si rvey'
(Continued from Page 1)

were not quite perfect when judged
from a standard of ideal excellence,
though they were highly satisfactory.
This implied imperfection was veri-
fled some years ago when several
members of the physics department
mounted the belfry with several hun-
dred tuning forks and finally decided
that the third bell was just a trifle
flat.
Not technically a chime, for that is
made up of eight bells, these bells
make up a peal since there are six
of them in a major chord. They are
arranged to play the Cambridge
I quarters, which is said to be an air
written either by Handel or based on
a motif in his "Messiah." It is these
quarters one hears at intervals of
what seems to be five or six minutes
when studying in the General Li-
brary. This same tune is played in
the clock tower of the Parliament
Building near Westminster Abbey by
Big Ben.
The six bells range in weight from
210 to 3071 pounds. The largest
strikes the hours and inscribed on its
side is the following inscription in
Latin: "Call together those who are
studious of all good things both hu-
man and divine."
Wesley Curran
Returns After
Year In Brazil
H. Wesley Curran, Grad., returned
last week from Brazil where he spent
a year on a fish commission of the
Brazilian government.
Mr. Curran was one of three mem-
bers of the commission appointed
from the United States. One of the
others, Dr. Stillman Wright, is a
member of the Federal Bureau of
Fisheries here. He is expected to re-
turn in the spring.
The purpose of the commission was
to study the fish in northeastern Bra-
zil and select suitable specimens with
which to stock newly erected reser-
voirs. The fish are to be used for
food for the inhabitants of that part
of the country.
Northeastern Brazil, Mr. Curran
said, is a semi-arid region which has
rain only four months of the year.
No rain fell in 1931, resulting in se-
vere hardships for the inhabitants of;
the region. To combat the drought,
the government is constructing reser-
voirs for drinking and irrigation. '
Mr. Curran is continuing his grad-
uate work here in the fish division
of the Museum of Zoology.
DAILY OFFICIAL'
BUJLLETA N '

/S

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

6:00-WJR House of a Thousand Eyes.
WWJ Ty Tyson.
WXYZ Contrasts in Music.
CKLW Omar.
6.15-WXYZ Joe Venutis' Music.
WWJ Dinner Music.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30 -WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45-WJR Strange as It Seemn.
WWJ Musical Moments.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas,
CKLW Old Bill.
7:00-WJR Myrt and Marge.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Easy Aces.
CKLW Shadows on the Clock.
7:15-WJR Jimmie Allen.
WWJ Popeye the Sailor.
WXYZ Nine to Five.
'7:30-WJR Kate Smith,
WWJ Evening Melodies.
WXYZ Musical Moments.
CKLW Variety Review.
7:45-WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Tune Twisters.
WXYZ Red Horse Ranch.
8:00-WJR Harve and Esther;
Victor Arden's Music.
WWJ Rudy Vallee's Music.
WXYZ Merry-Go-Round,
CKLW Gabriel Heatter.
8:15--CKLW Rick Roberts.
8:30-WJR Gertrude Nelsen and Harry
Richman.
WXYZ Gray Gordon's Music.
CKLW Little Symphony.
8:45-WJR Musical Program.
WXYZ Venetian Nights.
9:00-WJR Walter O'Keefe:
Glen Gray's Music.
WWJ Captain Henry's Showboat.
WXYZ Death Valley Days.
CKLW Marching Men.
9:15-CKLW Melody Treasure Hunt.
WXYZ Mellow Music.
CKLW Listen to This.
9:45-WXYZ Lowry Serenade.
CKLW Serenade.
10:00-WJR Horace Heidt's Brigadiers.
WWJ Bing Crosby : Jimmy Dorsey's
Music.
WXYZ For You -Madame.
CKLW Recital Hall.
10:15-WXYZ Reese and Dunn.
10:30-WJR March of Time.
WXYZ Lowry Clark.
CKLW Spotlight Revue.
10:45-WJR Musical Moments.
WXYZ Gray Gordon's Music.
11 :00-WJR Bulletins.
WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
WXYZ Baker Twins.
CXLW Star Dust.
11:15-WJR Moods in Music.
CKLW Katim's Music.
WXYZ Emil Coleman's Music.
11:30-WWJ GeorgeKavanagh's Music.
WXYZ Ben Bernie's Music.
CKLWFreddy Martin's Music.
11 :45-WJR "Solay" violinist.
CKLW Anson Weeks' Music.
12:00-WJR Bert Stock's Music.
WXYZ Ruby Newman's Music.
CKLW Enric Madrigearre's Music.
SOPHOMORE ENGINEERING DUES
Sophomore engineers are requested
to pay their class dues in order that
the class may be relieved of its debts
for the year. Dues may be paid to
H. C. Fones, John D. Staple, Ed Foote,
Walter Jensen, Clifford Elliott and
Carl H. Clement, treasurer.

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warrant and seizing a bank account,"
Professor Aigler commented. "In the
Iowa case the District Court has de-
cided that the bank account is not
subject to such seizure. In the Geor-
gia case the District Court was asked
to enjoin the collector from proceed-
ing further under the distress war-
rant. It refused to grant the in-
junction, but this refusal was re-
versed by the Circuit Court of Ap-
peals.
"Our interest naturally is in hav-
ing the validity of the tax expedi-
tiously and authoritatively decided.
The question before us now is the
working out of some plan whereby
we may put this pending case into
such shape that the basic question
may be decided."
Pirofessor Aigler ;conferred with
George Burke, University attorney,
yesterday on a means for bringing
the validity of the question before
the Supreme Court rather than hav-
ing the case bog down, as have the
others, on minor premises. He re-
ported that they expect to start action
in the U.S. District Court in Detroit
in the near future.
The Hon. Newton D. Baker, former
secretary of war, and, according to
Aigler, "one of the most outstanding
lawyers in the United States," has
been engaged as special counsel in
this matter by a national committee,
created to fight the tax on behalf of
all state-supported universities, and
if the case develops so that it 'is the
first to present the constitutional
question, it is expected that Mr.Baker
will. participate actively in the pro-
ceedings along with the regular Uni-
versity attorneys.
Professor Aigler is chairman of the

3
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1

CLA SSIFIED
AIVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
'~d ve11)(1)g;Departent. Phone 2-1214.
Thecasifedcolumns close at five
eck pevieus to day of insertion.
H umbers :nay be secured at on
'xtra charge.
Cash in advance l1c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
lie) for ono or two insertions. 10cI
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Mininun 3 lines per in-
sertion .
relehione rate - 15c per reading line
for i vour imore insertions. MiiinuC m
ui ree nIi es per insertion.
0' adiscount if paid within ten days
friomi the date of last insertion.
fly contract, per line 2 lines daily,
one month ..........8...c
4 lines E.0.13., 2 months ........8c
2 lines daily, college year ......7c
4 lines E.G.D)., 2 months..... ,..8C
100 lines used as desired - 9c
300 lines used as desired ..........8<
1 ,000 lines used as desired.......7
2.000 lines used as desired .. .....6
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch,
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
5r per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
oold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: White evening bag containing
gold Gruen watch, initials B.P.H.
Probably in front of Intramural
Bldg., Feb. 14. Reward. Call Bar-,
bara Horton, 2-2569. 305
LOST: Brown Gladstone suitcase. Vi-
cinity of South University and
Washtenaw. Bears the name, Hay-
nie. Call Tom Haynie, 6495 or Bob
Emmett, 5343. Liberal reward. 322
LOST: Alpha Omega fraternity pin
between Den and 625 Forest. Re-
ward. Phone 2-2861. 316
LOST: Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity
pin. Reward. Call Seingold. 2-1682.
300
LOST: Brown Gladstone suitcase,
corner Washtenaw and South Uni-
versity. Reward. Robert Emmett.
Phone 5343. 303
Hillel Foundation
Will Hold Tryouts
The Hillel Foundation has issued
an invitation to try out for the Hillel
staff for the second semester. Second
semester freshmen and all others
wishing to try out for positions on the
staff are asked to report to Shirrel
Kasle, '37, president of the Hillel
Council, from 3 to 5 p.m. on any week
day for assignments.
The Foundation will adopt a new
system of selecting officers of the,
staff, according to Kasle. Formerly
officers were elected, but under the
plan now being formulated all of-
ficers and committee chairman will
be selected on the basis of merit and
their respective abilities demonstrat-
ed as tryouts.

i

national committee
case.

FOR RENT -ROOMS
FOR RENT: A very desirable suite
for two boys in spacious private
home. Arranged to suit occupants.
Reasonably priced. Also one single
room for a boy who desires to do
light work as partial rent. Phone
9804 for full details. 323
FOR RENT: Double rooms. Clean and
walm. Running hot water. 411 N.
State Street. 319
A NICE warm front room. Two win-
dows. Completely furnished. 336
John St. Phone 2-1626. 421
BOY'S ROOM for rent. Front, single
with dormitory privilege. 1010 For-
est. 316
LARGE warm suite for one or two
students. One block from Engi-
neering Building. Reasonable. 1118
S. University. Phone 3743. 311
FOR RENT: Desirable suite and
single rooms for rent. 615 Monroe.
Next to Chi Psi house. 310
ROOM for two men. Large pleasant
room, third floor, double-deck,
single beds. 2 closets, 2 chiffoniers.
Shower bath with separate room
for lavatory and toilet. A bargain
for the second semester. See care-
taker, forenoon. 521 Walnut.
312
FOR RENT: Rooms. One single. One
double and one suite. 514 E. Jeffer-
son St. 313
SUITE with private bath and shower
for three men. Additional single if
group of four. Steam heat. Dial
8544. 422 E. Washington. 308
FOR RENT: Rooms for women grad-I
uate students. 820 East Washing-
ton. Phone 2-2394. 302
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 1x
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Library of English
classics. 10c to 75c per volume.
Many bargains to choose from. 1505
S. University. 7-9:30 p.m. 318
SOCIAL DANCING
Adult class every Thui
eve. at 8 p.m. Private
tessons daily, 10 to 10
Ii 'TERRACE GARDEN
IiS'T'UDIO
WuertliTheater Bldg.
S\ Phone 9695

conducting th

NOTICES
ONE THIRD OFF on all fur work.
E. L. Greenbaum, 448 Spring Street.
Phone 9625. 14x
FOR BETTER FOOD. Choice meats.
Fresh vegetables. Home made des-
serts, 13 meals $3.65. Try Slade's.
608 Hill Street near State. 306
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist. U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice.549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 1:3N
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
10x
STATIONERY: Print ed with your
name and address. 100 sheets. 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
DRESSMAKING-We have cloth and
silk samples. 1208 S. University.
Phone 2-2020. 12x
WANTED
WANTED: A flat-top student desk.
Phone 2-2891. 314
i, ,
What Critics Say of
"The New Gulliver"
Andre Semiwald, N.Y. Times-
"Ma gnificent humor . . . side split-
ting . . . technical brilliance."
John Mosher, The New Yorker-
"Crisp, graceful and witty . . . our
own dear land has no such contribu-
tion to make for our pleasure."
Robert Forsythe-
"Not only great, but bordering on the
miraculous . . .,you've never seen
anything like it!"
Also Mickey Mouse Short

he

I

Supreme Court
Will Be Bates'
SubjectSunday
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
School will speak on the "Supreme
Court and Unconstitutionality" at
4:15 p.m. Sunday in Room 316 in the
Union, Rush Bowman, '37, Union ex-
ecutive councilman, announced late
yesterday.
The speech to be given by Dean
Bates will be the first of a series of
lectures to be sponsored every week.
Union officials stated that the pur-
pose of the series was to promote a
better understanding between stu-
dents and faculty members as well as
to enable students to benefit from
special studies or hobbies carried on
by different professors.
Dean Bates is a recognized author-
ity on constitutional questions and
the Supreme Court. Several of the
Court justices are friends of Dean
Bates, and he has visited them many
times during his stay in Washington
while serving on various Federal
Commissions and committees.
A few weeks ago Dean Bates spoke
at a meeting of the New York Bar
Association and last fall he was in-
vited to address the St. Louis Bar. On
both occasions he spoke about the
Supreme Court and remarked about
the recent decisions of the court.

i

approval of the doctrine, while the
women supporters totalled 8 per cent.
Opposition to trial marriage was of-
fered by 72 per cent of the men and
87 per cent of the women.
An income of $3,000 a year was
declared to be essential by 65 per
cent of the students. Sixteen per
cent approved an annual income of
$1,500, while the highest recorded
minimum for marriage was $10,000,
desired by a woman student. Oppo-
sition to the wife's working if the
husband is able to support the family
was made by 81 per cent of the men
and 64 per cent of the women.
Both the men and women deniedl
the fact that children were the sole!
purpose of marriage. Only eight per
cent of the men considered children
vital to marriage while no woman
supported the statement. The survey
also revealed that more people from
small towns would marry not de-
siring children than would persons
from the larger cities.
Living with "in-laws" was frowned
upon by 68 per cent of men and wom-
en. Both men and women students
were evenly divided in answering the
question "Does a student marriage
hinder the advancement of the ca-
reer?" Fifty-one per cent of the men
and fifty-six per cent of the women
considered student marriage a detri-
ment to a career. Ninety-three per
cent of the men and ninety-six per
cent of the women would marry a
person who had been divorced.
Marriage to a person younger was
desired by 88 of the 105 men; 92
women wanted to marry a man who
was older, the disposition for an
older mate being shared by only 7
of the 105 men. As the age most
desirable for marriage the greatest
number of both men and women se-
lected 23 to 25. Twenty men and
thirty-eight women approved the
twenty to twenty-two year period as
the most desirable for marriage.
Companionship, intelligence and
personality were selected by students
as the most desirable personality
traits in the selection of a mate.
'ENSIAN TO HOLD TRYOUTS
All sophomores and second semester
freshmen wishing to tryout for the
Michiganensian staff are requested to
please report at the Michiganensian
office in the Student Publications
Building at 4:30 p.m. Fr.iday, Feb. 21.

z~!11[c;

8:15 P.M.
4:15 Friday

'A'

THURSDAY, FEB. 20, 1936
VOL. XLVI No. 95
Notices
To Department Heads and Others
Concerned: All time slips must be in
the Business Office Feb. 21 to be in-
cludled in the Feb. 29 payroll.
Edna G. Miller, Payroll Clerk.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments has received notices of Grad-
uate Appointments in Syracuse Uni-
versity to be made for the school year
by 1936-37. These awards are open
to qualified graduates of universities
and accredited colleges in the United
States, Canada, and foreign coun-
tries. They include the following
fields: Liberal Arts, Public Adminis-
tration, Political Science, Social Psy-
chology, Education, student counsel-
ling for men, and deanships for
women.
For details applyT 201Mason Hall
between 9-12, 2-4, Thursday, Friday,
Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 20, 21, 24
and 25.
All Students registered with the
Employment Bureau, in both the gen-
eral and the NYA divisions, are re-
quested to bring their records up to
date by adding their second semester
schedules, and also any changes of
address. This is important.
J. A. Bursley, Dean of Students.
Notice: It is requested that any-
one possessing a picture taken of any
ROTC parade or ceremony be good
enough to inform the editor of the
(Continued on Page 4)

I

-Today - Fri. - Sat.
MYRZNA LOY in
''WHIPSAW"
- and -
BUCK JONES in
"IVORY HANDLED GUNS"
"Roaring West" Chapter 12,

I

Continuous 1:30 - 11 p.m.
15c to 6--25c after 6
-- Last Times Today
Win. BOYD, Judith ALLEN
"Burning Gold"
And
John Wayne
"LAWLESS RANGE"
Extra
BUDDY THE G-MAN
Vitaphone Music Hall
- Friday - Saturday
Zasu Pitts "Affairs of Susan"
Ricardo Cortez tI Am a Thief"

35c

Iii

r - -- .....__ -

. .....,
.. ....

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U,

,1

Don't Destroy the Fine Flavor of Your Favorite
Blend of Coffee with Chlorinated Water
USE PURE SPRING WATER
ARBOR SPRI NGS WATER
Delivered to your home in cases of six 2-qt. bottles, or in large 5-gal. bottles.
Phone 8270 for Quick Service.
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER CO.
416 West Huron Phone 8270

j

III

Campus Cut- Rate Drug
218 So. State St. (Goldman Bldg.) Phone 9392 (We Deliver)
WEEK-END SPECIALS
Ann Arbor's Busiest Little Drug Store

GLORIA STUART
Constance Collier
Michael Whalen
C. Henry Gordon
< a DARRYL F. ZANUICK
2oth Century Production
resente y JosephM Sckenc
TODAY
MATINEE 2:30 P.M.
EVENING 8:30 P.M.
RESERVED SEATS
TWO HOURS
OF SHEER DELIGHT!
Warner Bros. present
Max Reinhardt's Production of
"tA
Midsummer
Night's
Dream
By WM. SHAKESPEARE
Music by MENDELSSOHN
With a Cast of 1000

Superior
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C__ ZD l - A ___

FOR A
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COME TO
PERSONAL FINANCE CO.
Married and single people comie to us every day
rather than bother their friends or relatives about
money. They tell us they like our service because
it is so personal. They know if they are. working
steadily they can get up to $300 on their own
signatures and get it quickly. Also-they can take
up to 20 months to repay. Do you need money?
Would a hundred dollars help you? Our busines is

11

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,500
POND'S TISSUES
21c
75c WRISLEY'S
Water Softener
49c
Large VASELINE
HAIR TONIC
67c
F"REE! V

CIGARETTES
$1 1 CARTON
L 10 Plus Tax
LUCKIES, CAMELS, O.G.'s,
CHESTERS, RALEIGHS
2 pkgs. 25c
$1.00 PACQUINS
HAND CREAM
FRI. - SAT. - SPECIAL!
GENUINE $5.00
SPARKLET SYPHON

VELDOWN
Sanitary Napkins
17c
or Four Pkgs. for
59c
Jergens Lotion
39C
DISPENSER FREE!
60c REM
4c

including:
JAMES CAGNEY
1lI r VI Dn\A/rI

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