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October 03, 1935 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-03

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THURSDAY, OCTOR' ERA 3, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

~FHURSDAY, OCTOBER 3,1935 PAGE SEVEI~

Detroit Drops
Series Opener.
: With Cubs, 3-0
ton Warneke Shuts Out
Bengals Allowing Only
4 Hits
(Continued from Page 1)

Wins First Handily

Play-By-Play Account Of First World
Series Game Between Cubs And Tigers

Fox rapped a single through the in- second on the play. Owen grounded
field to center. Rogell grounded out out, Jurges to Cavarretta.
to Cavarretta unassisted. Fox ran to No runs, one hit, no errors, one left.
I - -- -- - -- -

a long drive into left that missed the
top of the screen by inches. It
bounced off the wire for a double, but
Fox was left there a moment later
when Rogell flied to Lindstrom in
center who misjudged the ball, but
finally snagged it.
Cubs Threaten Again
The Cubs threatened again in the
third. Greenberg robbed Herman of
an extra base hit when he threw his
gloved hand across his body, leaped
high in the air and pulled down a
screaming liner. Lindstrom's short
fly fell safely in left for a Texas
League single, but Rowe got Hartnett
with a third strike. The hit and run
was on and Gehringer made a very
fine play on Cochrane's high throw,
pulling it down to get Gabby sliding
into the bag. It was a very close
play.
Jo Jo White got a single after two
were out in the Tiger half of the third,
but Cochrane dribbled an easy roller
to Warneke, who threw him out at
first.
In the Cub fourth, Demaree lined a
hit past Rogell's glove, went to sec-
ond when Phil Cavarretta layed down
a perfect bunt, and got to third as
Gehringer threw out Hack. Jurges
left him stranded however when he
missed a third strike.
The Tigers' best scoring chance
came in the fourth when with one
out, Greenberg and Rogell walked.
Fox was out on a close play at first
that brought the crowd to its feet,
both runners advancing. The stage
was set for Rogell to tie up the score
with a hit, but the best he could do
was a roller to Cavarretta at first
who beat him to the bag.
Rowe Doubles
Rowe gave the Bengals a ray of
hope in the fifth when he doubled
with one down, but he was left when
both White and Cochrane failed to
get the ball out of the infield.
In the seventh Owen walked after
two were out. Rowe drove a well
hit ball to left center that looked like
it was bleacher headed, but it faded
toward center and Lindstrom pulled
it downawith his back to the screen.
The last Tiger effort was a single
by Pete Fox, his second hit of the
game, but Warneke was not to be
denied as he made Rogell pop to Cav-
arretta, and Owen grounded out, sec-
ond to first.
Detroit was downcast, but hopeful
last night as the only real merriment
in the city was created by Cub fans
who were bent on celebrating their
victory. The* second game of the
series will be. played at 1:30 p.m. to-
day. The probable pitching choices
are Tommy Bridges for the Tigers
and Charley Root for the Cubs.

FJ
U
i
J
1
I
L
J
J
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i

Lon Warneke, Chicago Cub's ace
moundsman caused Detroit no end
of trouble yesterday throwing all he
had by the Bengals to win the first
game of the 1935 World Series.
His offerings netted the American
League Champs but four scatteredj
hits.

Big Ten Begins

Fourtieth

Year

Saturday Night

With the opening kick-off of the
Purdue-Northwestern football gamne
Saturday night, the Western Confer-
ence will begin its fortieth season of
athletic competition.
In 1895 the Intercollegiate Confer-
ence of Faculty representatives held
its first meeting. On January 11
presidents of seven universities met
in Chicago at the suggestion of Pres-
ident Smart of Purdue with the ex-
pressed purpose of considering the
future of athletics at the schools rep-
resented.
Little was accomplished at this
meeting, but the following year an-
other discussion was held and a con-
ference was organized popularly
known as the "Big Seven." Included
in it were Michigan, Northwestern,
Purdue, Chicago, Illinois, Minnesota,
and Wisconsin.
The "Big Seven" was the second re-
gional collegiate conference formed,
following a short time after the
Southern Conference and although
others have sprung up in every part
of the country, none has ever at-
tained the prestige of the Western
Conference.
In 1899 Indiana and Iowa univer-
sities were admitted and the "Big
Seven" became the "Big Nine" until
1908 when Michigan dropped out be-
cause of a disagreement of policy.
Almost from the beginning Wolverine
teams, especially football, had dom-
inated the Conference.
The entrance of Ohio State in 1912
brought about a revival of the name
of "Big Nine" and in 1917 Michigan
re-entered and ended the formative
part of the Big Ten's history.
Following the War the Conference
gained importance in the athletic
world with great rapidity. In 1927 it
became the first of the athletic con-1
ferences to state its aims. Among
these objectives were the development
of sportsmanship, the fostering of;
healthy recreation for the student,
and the offering of opportunity forI
athletic competition to as many asj
possible.t
In the last few years Western Con-
ference teams have dominated almost
every sport. National collegiate foot-
ball, basketball, swimming, golf, and
wrestling titles are held or have beenl
won by Big Ten squads and Confer-r
ence teams are considered as major
opponents by every school in the
country.E
Earned runs - Chicago 2. Two base
hits - Galan, Fox, Rowe. Home run
- Demaree. Sacrifices - Lindstrom,
Cavaretta, Herman. Left on bases -
Chicago 5; Detroit 8. Bases on balls
- Off Warneke 4 (Greenberg, Gos-
lin, Owen, Gehringer). Strikeouts -
Rowe 8 (Galan, Hartnett, Jurges 2,
Demaree, Cavaretta 2, Hack). War-
neke 1 (White). Double plays-
Cochrane and Gehringer. Passed
balls.-- Cochrane. Umpires - Mor-
iarty (AL) plate; Quigley (NL) first
base; McGowan (AL) second base;
Stark (NL) third base. Time 1:51.

(By The Associated Press)
FIRST INNING ,
Cubs: Umpire Moriarty suddenly
called a halt to order the removal
of sound camera apparatus from be-
hind the plate. Galan hit sharply
over second base and raced to second
as Rogell deflected the ball to short
center. It was scored as a two-base
hit. Herman dragged a roller along
the third base line and reached first
safely as Rowe threw wildly. Rowe
was charged with an error and Green-
berg, who made a desperate stab but
missed the ball, damaged a finger on
his right hand. Herman stopped at
first base. Lindstrom sacrificed,
Rowe to Greenberg, as Herman scam-
pered to second. Hartnett singled
to right, scoring Herman. Demaree
popped to Rogell behind the pitcher's
box. Cavaretta grounded to Gehringer
and Hartnett was a force out at sec-
ond, Gehringer to Rogell.
Two runs, two hits, one error, one
left.
Tigers: White fanned. Cochrane
hoisted a short fly to Galan. Geh-
ringer lifted a high one to Jurges
who backed up on the grass for the
catch.
No runs, no hits, no errors, none left.
SECOND INNING
Cubs: Hack looped a short fly that
Gehringer caught in short center.
Jurges lined a hit past Rogell. Goslin
juggled the ball and was charged
with an error as Jurges gained an
extra base and reached second. War-
neke flied to Fox in short right, Jurges
held second. Galan struck out swing-
ing at a change of pace. It was a
nice piece of work by Rowe and the
Tiger rooters let loose their first roar.
No runs, one hit, one error, one
left.
Tigers: Greenberg bounced to Hack
and was thrown out at first on a
close play. Umpire Moriarty went
over to the Chicago dugout to warn
the Cubs against making too much
comment. Goslin dribbled along the
first base line and was tossed out,
Warneke to Cavaretta. Fox doubled
against the right field screen. The
ball missed clearing the barrier for a
home run by barely a foot. Rogell
flied to Galan, who misjudged the
ball but backed up just in time to get
his outstretched hands on it.
No runs, one hit, no errors, one left.
THIRD INNING
Cubs: Herman lined to Greenberg
who made a sensational leaping catch
with his gloved hand to rob the Cub
second sacker of a base hit. Lind-
strom smacked the first pitch to left
for a single. Strike three was called
on Hartnett and Lindstrom was
doubled trying to steal, Cochrane to
Gehringer.
No runs, one hit, no errors, none
left.
Tigers: Owen hit sharply to the
box and Warneke made a quick
recovery, after deflecting the ball,
to catch the Tiger third baseman
with a quick throw to Cavarretta.
Rowe grounded out, Warneke to Cav-
arretta. White hit sharply over Cav-
arretta's head for a single. Fast work
by Demaree kept White from trying
for an extra base. Cochrane rolled
out to Warneke and was tossed out
at first.
No rus, one hit, no errors, one left.
FOURTH INNING
Cubs: Demaree cracked the first
pitch past Rogell for a single. The
Tiger shortstop had his hands out-
stretched but only succeeded in de-
flecting the drive. Cavarretta bunt-
ed along the first base line and was1
tossed out, Rowe to Greenberg, on
a close play as Demaree reached sec-
ond on the sacrifice. Hack rolled
out, Gehringer to Greenberg. Dem-
aree reached third on the putout.
Jurges fanned swinging at a high hard
one and the crowd let loose a yell.
No runs, one hit, no errors, one left.,

FIFTH INNING
Cubs: Warneke grounded

out

sharply to Greenberg, unassiste&:
Galan grounded out, Gehringer to
Greenberg. Herman lifted a high
fly that Goslin grabbed naf th left'
field foul line.
No runs, 'no hits, no ".ei' rs ~-non
left.
Tigers: Owen lined tQ } 15em4r4<in
deep right, Rowe caromed "a l
through the box and it we"d ' fr a
double as Jurges, in making a.fin
stab for the ball, deflected it to right
field. White grounded out, Herman
to Cavarretta. Rowe went to third.
Cochrane dribbled to Warneke, who
made the put out at first unassisted,
after taking the ball on the run.
No runs, dne hit, no errors, one
left.
SIXTH INNING
CubE: Lindstrom lifted the first
pitch to Gehringer who made the
catch a few steps back of second base.
Hartnett smashed a single between
Owen and Rogell. Demaree fanned,
swinging at a fast ball. Cavarretta
fanned, swinging at a curve.
No runs, one hit, no errors, one left.
Tigers: Gehringer rolled out. Her-
man to Cavarretta. Greenberg popped
to Hack, who made the catch near
the base line back of third. Goslin
hit sharply toward the box, Warneke
deflecting the ball to Herman who
threw out the runner at first.
No runs, no hits, no errors, none
left.
SEVENTH INNING
Cubs: Hack fanned on a called
third strike. Jurges popped to Rogell,
who made a nice catch pn the grass
behind third base. The bat flew
from Jurges' hands as he swungnat a
curve. Warneke grounded out on the
first pitch, Gehringer to Greenberg.
No runs, no hits, no errors, none
left.
Tigers: Fox rolled out, Warneke to
Cavarretta. The Cub pitcher was
using a screw ball effectively and had
the Tigers topping many of their
shots. Rogell lifted a short fly that
Jurges caught in foul territory after
a hard run. Owen walked, the fourth
ball being inside. Rowe hit a tower-
ing fly that Lindstrom caught while
standing a few feet in front of the
screen in left center.
No runs, no hits, no errors, one left.
EIGHTH INNING
Cubs: Galan bounded to Green-
berg and reached first safely with
a slide as Greenberg fumbled the
ball. The Tiger first baseman was
charged with an error. Herman sac-
rificed on a nice bunt down the first
base line, Rowe tossing to Greenberg
for the putout as Galan raced to sec-
ond. Galan went to third on a passed
ball. Lindstrom rolled to Rowe who
whirled, after faking a throw to third,
and barely caught the hitter with a
fast throw to Greenberg. Hartnett
flied to White.
No runs, no hits, one error, one left.
Tigers: White bunted to Hack and
was called out at first on a close
play, Hack to Cavarretta. The Tigers

Tigers: Gehringer rolled to the box
and was tossed out, Warneke to Cav-
arretta. It was the fourth successive
assist for the Cub pitcher.
Greenberg walked, the fourth pitch
being low and inside. Goslin walked
on the fourth straight ball, moving
Greenberg to second. Fox grounded
to Jurges who came in fast and
nipped the hitter with a quick toss
to Cavarretta. Greenberg went to
third and Goslin to second on the
putout. Hartnett threw to Jurges in
an attempt to catch Goslin napping.
Rogell rolled out to Cavarretta un-
assisted. The Cub first baseman
grabbed the ball a few feet from the
bag and beat Rogell by a step as both
dove for the base.
No runs, no hits, no errors, two left.

kicked vigorously over Umpire Quig-
ley's decision and the crowd booed.
Cochrane grounded out, Warneke to
Cavarretta, as the Cub pitcher reg-
istered his eighth assist and equalled
the world series record. Gehringer
walked, the fourth ball being high
and inside. Greenberg grounded out,
Hack to Cavarretta who stretched his
full length to the right to bag the
throw.
No runs, no hits, no errors, one left.
NINTH INNING
Cubs: Demaree cracked a home run
half way up into the open stands in
left field. Cavarretta fanned, swing-
ing, and hurled his bat toward the
Chicago bench. Hack lined to White
in short center. Jurges fanned swing-
ing. Cochrane dropped the ball but
tagged out the batsman before he
'ould make an attempt to run.
ne run, one hit, no errors, none
rs: Goslin flied to Lindstrom.
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--

BOX SCORE
ABRHOA

#

Chicago

Galan,if . .........4
Herman, 2b.........3
Lindstrom, cf ........3
Hartnett, c.........4
Demaree, rf ..........4
Cavaretta, lb ........3
Hack, lb ...........4
Jurges, ss ............4
Warneke, p... ... .3
Total ...........32
Detroit AB
White, cf ............4
Cochrane, c '..........4
Gehringer, 2b ........3
Greenberg, lb. . ....3
Goslin, if ......... ..3
Fox, rf....... . ..4
Rogell, ss... ......4
Owen, 3b ............3
Rowe, p ..............3
Totals ............31

1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
3
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
0
1
2
2
0
0
1
0
7

2
0
2
1
1
17
1
2
1
27

0
3
0
0
0
0
3
2
8
16
A
0
1
4
0
0
0
0
0
3
8

ALPINE.

DOWNS

H O
1 2
0 8
0, 3
0 9
0 1
2 1
0 3
0 0
1 0
4 27

4
b

Saffelt

&

$Jush

Chicago ............200 000 001-3
Detroit ............000 000 000-0
Errors - Rowe, Goslin, Greenberg.
Runs batted in -Hartnett, Demaree.

-- - - - - -

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