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February 02, 1936 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 15, 1936

The Staff Of The J-Hop Extra
H ~
Managing Editor THOMAS H. KLEENE
Associate Editor JOHN J. FLAHERTY
Associate Editor THOMAS E. GROEHN

J-Hop Issue Editor

THOMAS H. KLEENE

ASSISTANTS: Clinton B. Conger, Arnold S. Dan-
iels, Joseph S. Mattes, Charlotte D. Rueger,
Guy M. Whipple, Jr.

Business Manager
Credit Manager.

GEORGE H. ATHERTON
JOSEPH A. ROTHBARD

J-Hop Issue Bus. Mgr. WILLIAM G. BARNDT
J-Hop Issue Publication Mgr. Lyman Bittman
J-Hop Issue Service Mgr. Willis Tomlinson
J-Hop Issue Advertising Mgrs. .. Stanley Joffe,
John Park, Edward Wohlgemuth.
ASSISTANTS: Donald Bronson, Herbert Falen-
der, John Gustafson, Clayton Hepler.
+ + -- -__._. _.
Stiff Shirts And
The J-Hop ...
IF ANYBODY thought we were through
carrying on our editorial battle with
the farm and home editors who put out the Michigan
State News at East Lansing, Mich., he's barking up a
horse of another color.
It is our understanding that the J-Hop up at Lan-
sing is not formal, if you really care to wear your own
clothes. There, now, what do you know about that?
The idea, it seems, is simply this: The Michigan State
gentlemen who are in charge of the Hop, realizing that
there was a basketball game just before the dance,
figured that many of "the boys" might not be able to
rush home after the game in time to get into one of
them there gosh-durned store shirts that you wear to
formals, so the whole business is optional. It is our
guess that something very nice in a brown corduroy,
with a hairy sweater, will predominate when Freddy
Martin's band plays for the evening's festal doings.
Of course our readers' immediate reaction will follow
these lines: Just why in the wide, wide world should
anybody want to see the Michigan State basketball
team play? They aren't any good, are they?
No, it is true, the Michigan State basketball team
isn't much.
The secret is out. One of "the boys" on the State
basketball team is a gentleman named Garlock. Mr.
Garlock is also the boss of the State J-Hop.
Our Library
Love Nests ---
L ET'S GO to the General Library and
study, dear. While the more somber
and, we will add, the more intellectual students were
up to their elbows in Plato, calculus, hydraulics, and
the Sino-Japanese War, the delicately muralled walls
of the main reference room of our Library were softly
echoing the whispered "I love you too, dearests" of the
moonburned lovers who persisted in substituting
"study" for their usual evenings at the Bell, the Parrot,
or the Union.
Like Al Smith and the Liberty League, we must view
with undisguised alarm rather than "point with pride"
at what we consider the regrettable intrusion (going
on with our Constitutional idea) of our rights of privacy
with our books, which we love.
We are firm believers in Sex, with a capital "S."
Don't get us wrong. But the young men and women
who came into the Library, draped their coats and
hats over ours, "read" for a minute or two, and then
launched into the holding of hands and (God forbid!)
even the soft humming of a few bars of "I'm in the
Mood for Love," were definitely a social menace.
We attribute our 'C' in Modern Drama to the Library
Lovelorns and their soft "Do you really and truly, dar-
lings?" After all, who can hope to adequately grasp
"Hedda Gabler" and Strindberg and Maeterlinck by
the horns, which is where they must be grasped, when
their reference room's air is perfumed with Love on
the Run?
Remember, spring and bock beer and the Arboretum
will soon be here. There's a time and a place for every-
thing. Please, Love Dust advocates, let us alone when
it comes time for June finals!

THE SCREEN
PREVUE OF THE MAJESTIC
"IF YOU COULD ONLY COOK"
(Saturday Through Tuesday)
"A grand-new, brand-new love team" is what the
publicity items claim is in store for the J-Hoppers at
the Majestic Theatre, which is bringing Herbert Mar-
shall and Jean Arthur for a Saturday-through-Tues-
day run in the romantic comedy "If You Could Only
Cook."
The film concerns itself with a disgruntled million-
aire who allows a strange but very attractive girl (did
you have a blind date for the Hop, too?) he meets on
a park bench to coax him into going with her to answer
an ad for a domestic couple. He becomes butler and
she a maid.
Marshall, who is already well-known as a stage and
screen star, made his talking picture debut in 1929 with
Jeanne Eagles in "The Letter." Miss Arthur, who in
her blonde way is quite a tasty dish, once modelled
for Howard Chandler Christy, the noted artist.
PREVUES OF THE MICHIGAN
"STARS OVER BROADWAY"
(Thursday Through Saturday)
"Stars Over Broadway," Warner Brothers' new
musical comedy drama, which will be shown at the
Michigan Theatre through Saturday for the first time
locally, takes the audience behind the scenes of broad-
casting stations and night clubs in what is said to be
one of the most entertaining and tuneful pictures in
recent months.
The romances of radio stars, the struggles and tribu-
lations of aspiring songbirds, their rise to success and
their consequent downfall is presented in "Stars Over
Broadway." Action, comedy, catchy songs and the
usual "spectacles" are all knit into the production.
An all-star cast, including James Melton, famed
radio singer, Pat O'Brien, Jane Froman, Jean Muir,
Frank McHugh, and Frank Fay lend their talents to
the Michigan's musical, Melton and Miss Froman play
their real-life roles of radio entertainers; O'Brien and
Miss Muir play opposite each other in the romantic
leads; and McHugh is cast as a song plugger. Busby
Berkeley and Bobby Connolly, two of the country's
better known dance directors, have their fingers prom-
inently in the pie.
SUNDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY
"CEILING ZERO"
(Sunday Through Wednesday)
First National Pictures is reported to have placed
every facility of its Hollywood studios at the disposal
of Director Howard Hawks and assigned two of the
films' most competent male stars to head the list of 20-
odd major players for the filming of "Ceiling Zero," a
drama of the air lanes.
The players are James Cagney and Pat O'Brien, who
had teamed in "Here Comes the Navy," "Devil Dogs of
the Air" and "The Irish in Us." Supporting them are
Stuart Erwin, eccentric comedian, June Travis, Craig
Reynolds, former leading man for Mary Pickford,
Carlyle Moore, Jr., and Barton McLane.
Through an arrangement, sanctioned by the U.S.
Postoffice Department, the United Airlines, Inc. loaned
the studio airport space and 40 airplanes, including a
number of Boeings, Northrops, and Lockheed models.
Equipment borrowed to authenticate the airmail and
passenger service background, including innumerable
dispatch forms, weather reports, weather maps, stew-
ardess' hampers, radio earphones, head sets, mail bags,
and so on, have aided the producers in preserving the
utmost in cinematic veracity.
Reviewers in the metropolitan newspapers have been
unstinting in their praise of "Ceiling Zero." We are
taking the chance - but it seems a safe chance - of
unhesitatingly recommending "Ceiling Zero" as the
best of the J-Hop week-end fare.
THE FORUM
He Should Leave School
To the Editor:
This is a hard luck story - without doubt the most
tragic you have ever heard.
I am an Italian by birth, my father and mother com-

ing to America when I was six years old: so I was
brought up to speak the Italian language. My folks
know very little English (Dad works in a restaurant
specializing in Italian foods and has no need for Eng-
lish) and so we at home speak only in our native tongue.
Looking for a "pipe" last September, (since I had a
heavy schedule, of course) I enrolled in an Italian 31
class, having already taken Italian 1 and 2 for "pipes"
my freshman year.
I FLUNKED ITALIAN 31.
Why? I COULDN'T SPEAK ITALIAN AND TRANS-
LATE IT WELL ENOUGH TO SUIT THE INSTRUC-
TOR -MY FOLKS SPEAK A DIALECT !
Then, last night while I was listening to the radio
and reading an Italian newspaper my father sent me,
I received a long distance call from my father.
He asked me in Italian: "How did you come out in
your grades, son?"
And I replied: "I got 4 B's and an E, dad."
"An E in what?"
And then I answered -in Italian: "In Italian, dad."
I am leaving school next semester.
-R.A.C., '37.

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Since 1908 314 SOUTH STATE ST. Phone 6615
When Your
Clothing Is Styled
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It is CORRECT
in Every Detail. '

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State Street Ann Arbor

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