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February 01, 1936 - Image 2

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I

PAGE TWO

'III MICHIGAN 1nAlry

SA1ITRI3AY, PEURIJARY 1, 19~L

H H

Speech Institute
Plans Intensive
Sumuner Work'
Linguistic Science To Be
Studied Under Excellent
MichiganFacilitiesE
The Linguistic Institute, the pur-
pose of which is to encourage the
study and research of linguistic
science, will be conducted under the
joint auspices of the University and
the Linguistic Society of America as
part. of the 1936 Summer Session, it
was announced yesterday by Prof.
Charles C. Fries, editor of the Early
Modern English Dictionary, who has
been chosen director of the insti-
tute.
Conducted first at Yale University
and then in New York for four sum-
mer seasons, from 1928 to 1931, the
institute will be revived here be-
cause of the University's excellent
facilities for the study of linguistic
science, Professor Fries said.
Ann Arbor Has Advantages
Among the advantages of Ann Ar-
bor, he numbered the great collec-
tions of material built up by the
Early Modern English Dictionary and
the Middle English Dictionary, the
papyri and other source material ex-
cavated by the Near-East expeditions,
and the large number of faculty men
who are interested in the subject.
In the 21 courses now provided for,
the institute will endeavor to deal
with four aspects of language study:
the science of language; the compar-
ative grammar of different lan-
guages; the historical development of
a language; and an elementary study
of non-Indo-European languages,
such as Coptic, Chinese, Japanese,
Assyrian, and Ethiopic.
In addition to courses, there will
be lectures and conferences on lin-
guistic topics throughout the Sum-
mer Session, Professor Fries said.
Tells Of Purpose
"We are striving not simply for a
knowledge of languages, but we are
trying to understand language as a
social phenomenon," Professor Fries
said. "We wish to know the reasons
for language change, the laws of
language development, and the basic
relationships of languages."
Non - Indo - European languages,
Professor Fries said, have been in-
cluded so that the student may grasp
the structure of a language entirely
different from ours.
The organization of the institute
was undertaken by a joint committee
of the University and the Linguistic
Society of America. Members of the
committee are Professor Fries, chair-
man, Prof. W. H. Worrell of the or-
iental languages department, Prof.
N. L. Willey of the German depart-
ment, Prof. R. G. Kent of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, and Prof.
E. H. Sturtevant, of Yale University,
who has been selected associate di-
rector of the institute.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BU.lETI1
SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 1936
VOL. LVI No. 91
Notices
Registration Notice: During the
period from Wednesday noon to Fri-
day noon (Feb. 12-14) students may
register only for themselves individ-
ually with the following two excep-
tions, namely:
(1) The registrant may bring the
registration blanks of one or more
fellow students whose names fall
within the same published alphabet-
acil subdivision as his own.

(2) He may register for students
outside his own alphabetical group
(not for himself) during the period
or periods alphabetically allotted to
such other student or students.
Obviously if registrations were to
be attempted in more than one al-
phabetical group at once the whole
endeavor to save time by the alpha-
betical grouping would break down.
During Friday afternoon or Sat-
urday morning, registrants may reg-
ister for others besides themselves, as
these two half days have not been al-
lotted to any specific group.
This announcement is to clarify
any misunderstandings which have
arisen and to cancel any announce-
ments contrary hereto.
Shirley W. Smith, Vice-
President and Secretary.
LaVerne Noyes Scholarships: Hold-
ers of LaVerne Noyes Scholarships

EVENING RADIO PBOCR AM

i
r

6:00--WJR Muswica Program ,
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Aviation Interview.
WXYZ Girl Friends.
WMBC One Hour's Music.
6:15-WJR Musical Moments.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30 -WJR Al Roth's Syncopators.
WXYZ Federation of women's Clubs.
wWJ Press-Radio: Soloists.
WXYZ Day in Review.
6:45-WJR Musical Masters.
WWJ Musical Masters.
WXYZ Dinner Hours.
CKLW Old Bill.
7:00-WJR Nazar Kurkdjie's Ensemble
WW~J New Yorkers.
WXYZ Town Talk.
CK~LW Shadows On The Clock.
WJBK Aristocrats.
7:15-WJR Inquiring Reporters.
wWZ Popeye The Sailor.
WXYZ Lady in Blue.
7:30--WJR Edward D'anna's Band.
WWJ Deibridge's Music.'
WXYZ Musical Moments.
CKLW Imperial Singers.
7 :45-WXYZ Sandlotters.
WWJ Hampton Singers.
CKLW Washington Merry-Go-
Round.
8:00-WJR Beauty Box Theater.
WW.J "Your Hit Parade."
WXYZ Gray Gordon's Music.
CKLW Song Symphony.
8:15-WXYZ Boston Symphonv.

cKi LW T'ed Weeims' Mvusic.
8 :30- C.LW Bob Albright.
9:00 -WJR Nina QMartii:i Andre Kos
lanietz' M~usic.
Vi/XVW rlan 1'! ro;v li1. ll> Mci'
1 K0 Chariotrs. ies s
9:15- CKLW Andrew I". Kelly
WXYZ Biagini's MusicM
9:30-WJR Along Bia Ito Riisol
WWJ Al Jolson.
WNX'Z' Barn D~ance.
CKL~W Eddie [Brown.
100 WR Clitori Mvelo is
10:30- WJ "Rockets Expose."
W "ej Onele ce '.e
CKIEW Melodic ModeI'e.
WYZ Don Besior's Music.
11:00-- WbJ1 c1 atC(' M .'.?c.
WWI As yn' usic.
WXYZ-Blaker Twins.
11:15-CKLW JackC w iton's Music.
WXYi '. nI awry 1 Clc'sMusic,
11:30WJ (Jeorge Olsen's Music.
WW.I n Mu usic.sic
WtXY', Ray Noble's: Music.
12:00--WJR Dornberger's Music.
CKLW Jan ISre's Music.
w W, Dance us.ic.
WXYZ 400 Club.
12:30- -Wxy Ton Coak iy's Music.
WJR iHerbie Kay's Music.
CKlW Ted Wteens' Music.
1:00 --CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
1:30--Will Osborne's Music.

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during the first semester should in-
terview Dr. Frank E. Robbins, 1021
Angell Hall, at once if they desire
scholarship aid for the second se-
mester.
To Faculty and Students: Atten-
tion is called to the following By-
Laws adopted by the Board of Re-
gents in September, 1934:
"Students should realize that their
enrollment in the University carries
with it obligations in regard to con-
duct, not only inside but also out-
side the classroom, and they are ex-
pected to conduct themselves so as to
be a credit both to themselves and
to the University. They are amen-
able to the laws governing the com-
munity as well as to the rules and
orders of the University and Uni-
versity officials, and are expected to
observe the standards of conduct ap-
proved by the University.
Whenever a student, group of stu-
dents, society, fraternity or other
student organization fails to observe
the principles of conduct as above
outlined, or conducts himself or it-
self in such a manner as to make
it apparent that he or it is not a de-
sirable member of the University, he
or it shall be liable to disciplinary
action."
Attention is also called to the fol-
lowing announcement made by the
University Committee on Student
Conduct in September, 1934:
"It is the opinion of the University
that the use of intoxicating liquors
in a fraternity house has a tendency
to impair the morale of the organiza-
tion and is contrary to the best in-
terests of both the fraternity itself
and of the University."
Joseph A. Bursley, Chairman
University Committee on
Student Conduct.
Contemporary: Manuscripts for the
third issue should be left at the Eng-
lish office, 3221 A.H. as soon as pos-
sible.
Automobile Regulation: Those stu-
dents who possess driving permits is-
sued during 1935 and have failed to
renew them, are requested to do so
immediately. This request applies
to those who will use their 1935 State
license plates until August 1, as well
as to those who have purchased 1936
plates. All old student permit tags
are void as of Feb. 1, 1936 and their
continued use will constitute grounds
for disciplinary action. Applications
for renewals must be made at Room
2, University Hall and new sets of
permit tags will be issued at no addi-
tional cost.
K. E. Fisher.
Faculty Meeting, College of Litera-
ture, Science and Arts: The regular
February meeting of the Faculty of
the College of Literature, Science and
the Arts, will be held in Room 1025
AH Monday afternoon, Feb. 3, be-
ginning at 4:10 o'clock.
Agenda:
Report,of Executive Committee, H.
D. Curtis.
Report from University Council, V.
W. Crane.
Report of Deans' Conferences, E. H.
Kraus.
Resolution concerning Professor
Moses Gomberg, G. R. LaRue.
Special Order: Recommendations
of the Degree Programs Committee.
Discussion of the Slosson Resolu-
tion.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received announcement of Unit-
ed States Civil Service Examinations
for Senior Inspector and Inspector,
Engineering Materials (Mechanical
and Electrical), salary, $2,000 to $2,-
600; Senior Inspector and Inspector,

Aircraft Overhaul and Repair, (for
filling position of Senior Inspector,
Engineering Materials, Aeronautical),,
salary $2,000; Inspector, Engineering
Materials and Construction (Aero-
nautical) and Inspector, Engineering
Materials (Aeronautical), (for Aero-
nautical Engineering Materials, Gen-;
eral, and Aeronautical Engineering
Materials, Motors), salary $2,000.
For further information concern-
ing these examinations call at 201
Mason Hall, oflice hours, 9:00 to 12:00
and 2:00 to 4:00.
Student Loans: There will be a
meeting of the Loan Committee in;
Room 2, University Hall, Thursday;
afternoon, Feb. 6. Applications for,
loans for the second semester should
be made at once.
J. A. Bursley, Chairman.
Faculty, College of Engineering:
There will be a meeting of the Facul-
ty of this College on Monday, Feb.
3, at 4:15 p.m., in Room 348 West;
Engineering Building. The special
order will be a proposal to establish
an Executive Council of this College.
A. H. Lovell, Secretary.
University Women: The closing;
hour for University women attending
the J-Hop will be 3:30 a.m. If they,
also plan to attend a breakfast af-
terward, the closing hour will be
4:30.
Alice C. Lloyd, Dean of
Women.
S o c i a l Directors, Chaperons,
Houuseheads; iUniversi ty Women:
Girls may obtain out-of-town per-
mission from their househeads for
absence from Ann Arbor between ex-
aminations and after they have
finished all examinations.
There shall be no over-night guest
in any approved undergraduate house
or dormitory during the examination
period.
Undergraduate women Who are
changing their residence or their
room are requested not to move until
Feb. 13 or 14.
Lost and Found Articles: Two val-
uable watches were turned in at the
Lost and Found Department, Room 3,
University fHall, during the past few
weeks. These watches may be
claimed upon proper identification.
Academic Notices
Psychology 31, Lecture 1: Final ex-
amination Monday afternoon. Stu-
dents with last names beginning with
A-B inclusive go to Room B, Haven
Hall; C-F inclusive go to Room 101
Economics Building; G-K inclusive
go to Room C, Haven Hall: L-Z in-
clusive go to Natural Science Audi-
torium. Please take alternate seats.
No blue-books are required.
Music B140, Survey of Music in
America, will be given Tuesday and
Thursday at 2 o'clock in Room 312
Hill Auditorium.
Political Science 1, final examina-
tion, Saturday, Feb. 8, 2 p.m. Stu-
dents will meet in rooms as indicat-
ed:
Cuncannon's sectons, 205 M.H.
McCaffree's sections, CH.H.
Kallenbach's sections, 25 A.H.
Calderwood's sections, 35 A.H.

Dorr's sections, 1035 A.H.
'lti ll Ji1 t l'.rII S h. a ;.!c nflct
TPue '.in ,l ']', u,. I 7'noi 35
Philosophy 180: British Philosophy
of the Seventeent h and Eighteenth
Centuries. This course will be offered
the second semester on M.W.F. at 10
'clOCK i Room 408 Library. Three
hours credit. Hoekstra. It was er-
roneously described in thec Announce-
ment as a first semester course, and
as carrying only two hours of credit.
Psychology 31; Lecture Sec. 11: For
the final examination students with
initials from A to K go to Room 103
R. L., those with initials from L to Z
go to Room 231 A.H.
Chemistry 6: A new section is be-
ing ofered for the second semester
under Lecture Section II. Section
20, Quiz MF 10, Room 303 Chem;
Laboratory Tu Th 10-12, Room 430
Chem.
Sociology 54 will meet for the final
examination, Feb. 10 in the morning
in Room 25. Angell Hall.
R. C. Fuller.
Geography I: Rooms for final ex-
aminations. James' section, 35 Al.
Kendall, 10 o'clock, section 35 A.H.
Kendall, 1 o'clock section, 25 A.H.
Kendall, 2 o'clock section, 209 A.H.
Foster's section, 209 A.H.
Geology 121: The report on the
prevailing westerlies and the weather
in the area affected by them is not!
to be written before the final examin-
ation as announced, but to be written
during the examination period.
Ecenomics 51: Rooms for final ex-
amination Thursday morning, Feb. 6:j
205 M.H., Anderson's sections.
103 R.L., Church's sections.
1035 A.H., Wier's sections.
25 A.H., Miller's and Hebbard's
sections.
1025 A.H., Danhof's and French's
sections.
Final Examination in Eng. 159, Sec.
2 (Tues., Thurs., Sat. at 10). The ex-
amination schedule as listed in the
Catalogue with the letter C is an
error; the examination should be
scheduled with the letter J and will
be given Tuesday morning, Feb 4.
Paul Mueschke
Music B124: "Richard Wagner and
the Music Drama" will be given at
9:00 a.m., Tuesday and Thursday in-
stead of at 8:00 a.m., as announced
in the catalogue.
Rooms for final examinations,
French (0), Thursday, Feb. 6, p.m.:
Final examinations in French will be
held in the following rooms:
French 1 (Morning classes), West
Gal. Alum. Mem. Hall.
French. I (afternoon classes), 1025
Angell Hall.

('A S SIFIED
ADVERTISING
Pl cead vertisements with Classified
dvertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
rue classified columns close at five
)'clock previous to day of insertion.
kox numbers may be secured at on
xtra charge.
Cash in advance Ilcp er reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions. 10c
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Minimum 3 lines per in-
sertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
discount if paid within ten days
from The date of last insertion.
ty cointract, per line -2 lines daily.
olle iolitli....................HC
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months........8c
2 lines daily, college year......7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.......c
100 lines used as desired. . 9C
00 lines used as desired<.......8
1,000 lines used as desired.....
2.000 lines used as desired.. ..6
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch,
Conic type, upper and lower case. Add
3c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
FOR RENT - ROOMS
FOR RENT: One suite and a double;
overstuffed furniture; very desir-
able. Board if desired. Board job
available. 602 Monroe, %-block
from campus. 281
FOR RENT: Desirable room for Uni-
versity women. Senior or graduate.
Apartment 3, 220 S. Thayer, Mc-
Entie Apt. Phone 2-1225. 279
UPPER-CLASSMEN only. One single
and one double, well-lighted room
at 928 Forest. 277
BOYS: For rent -three very fineI
suites and a single room. Bath
on each floor. 615 Monroe. Phone
2-3320. 278

NICE single, steam heated room, first
floor. Available next semester.
500 Calherme Street. Phone 9749.
271
BOARD JOB -Guaranteed to boys
renting nice rooms. Phone 8654.
266
FOR RENT: Single room for student.
One-half block from Intramural.
921 Mary Street. Phone 8668. 262
WANTED
THREE young men free to travel.
Must be high school graduates or
college men. Transportation fur-
nished. Salary. See Mr. Burton 7
to 10 p.m. Allenel Hotel. 257
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone'
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Tuxedo, good as new.
Will sell cheap. Phone 8407. 282
FOR SALE: A beautiful new fur coat,
size 14-16. 720 Haven. Phone
8261. 274
APPLES 50c bushel and up. Clean
fruit; filtered cider. Phone 3926.
Will deliver. 1003 Brooks St.
264

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING'

N6TICES
WE WILL rent you furniture for the
J-Hop. Alexanders. 417 E. Liberty.
267

DRESSMAKING-
silk samps.
Phone 2-2020.

--We have cloth and
1208 S. University.
12x

ATTENTION--13 meals $3.65. Fresh
vegetables, meats, home-made des-
srts. SLADE'S, 608 Hill St. near
State. 256
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Occulist, U. of M.
gradu' te, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866.
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
lox
LOST AND FOUND
KEY CASE --Between Union and
library. Reward. Phone 8137 or
University Extension 380. 275

I IIJ

FOR SALE:: Reasonable. Dress suit
and tuxedo complete. Both in very
good condition. Phone 3606. 305
East Liberty. 265
FOR SALE: Chiffonier, desks, book
rack, apartment range, chairs,
dresser. Other furniture, including
few choice antiques. 928 Oakland.
255
BROKEN RAIL KILLS 3
SUNBURY, Pa., Jan. 31. - (P) -A
preliminary investigations showed
tonight that a broken rail shot the
Reading Co.'s night express, The
Williamsporter, off a bridge last
night, carrying three persons to their
deaths and injuring 31 others.

Last lTimes Today
"SHOW THEM NO MERCY"
ad
"THE LAST OUTPOST"
Sun. - Mon. - Tues.
Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire
in
"TOP HAT"
Ralph Bellamy in
"NAVY WIFE"

FOR SECOND SEMESTER: Quiet,
sunny room in private home for one
or two, preferably graduate stu-
dents or faculty members. 1530 Hill
Street. Phone 8033. 272
FOR RENT: Single or double room or
suite. Shower, well heated. 537 Al-
len. Phone 5291. 273
COMFORTABLE single room with
running water. 721 Church Street.
270
SINGLE and double rooms. Clean,
warm, and well furnished. 503 E.;
Liberty. 268j

Id

Daily 15c to 6 - 25c After 6

i

hr

I

FOR RENT: Suite. with private bath
and shower for three men. Avail-
able now. Also double room with
adjoining lavatory. Steam heat,
shower bath. Phone 8544. 422 E.
Washington. 263
PLEASANT Room: Single or double,
near fraternities, east of campus.
Reasonable. E. Smith. Phone
2-3870 or 2-2101. 280
FOR RENT: Rooms for Jewish girls.
1511 Washtenaw Avenue. Tele-
phone 3851. 276

TREAT YOURSELF
TO A KOSHER
MEAL...
BREAKFAST SPECIALS
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
COMPLETE DINNERS
and
A LARGE VARIETY
OF AFTER-THEATRE
SANDWICHES
Kruger's
DELICATESSEN
Resurant
Open 7 A.M. to 2 A.M.
233 S. State At Head of Liberty

Continuous 1:30 - 11 P.M.
--- Last Day
Two First-Run Features!!
CHARLES STARRETT
"A SHOT IN THE
DARK"
from "Dartmouth Murders"
-- --and-
.Tom Brown - Marian Nixon.
"SWEEPSTAKE
ANNIE"
Extra -
STORY OF A COAST GUARD
STRANGER THAN FICTION
NEWS
Starts Sunday
Esther Ralston
"Forced Landing
"I LIVE FOR LOVE"
Delores Del Rio

renclih
French
toritium.
French
I-all.
French
Building.
French
Building.
French
Building.
French

2, 1025 Angell Hall.
31, Natural Science Audi-'
32, West Physics Lecture
11, 103 Romance Language
41, 103 Romance Language
71, 103 Romance Languag;e

111, 25 Angell Hall.

Religious Activities-

(Continued lOn iPge, 4)

I

THIS WEEK SPECIAL
CHOCOLATE
MARSHMALLOW
SUNDAE
with Old-Fashioned
Mint Candy Ice Cream
Delivery Service
Phone 9819
1204 South University

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
at the MASONIC TEMPLE
327 South Fourth
Ministers:
William P. Lemon
and Norman W. Kunkel
9:45- "RELIGION AND THE FEAR
OF FAILURE," Mr. Kunkel.
t0:45 -
Sermon by Dr. John MacKay
of New York City
5:00 -- Round Table Discussion, Dr.
Lemon Lea d e r: "CREATIVE
CHRISTIANITY."
6:00 --Fellowship Supper.
6:30 - Westminster Guild. Group
Discussion of the above theme.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Roger Williams Guild
R. EDWARD SAYLES and
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN, Ministers
Dr. Sayles will speak on:
"IF YE LOVE ME"
Communion Service follows.
6:00 P.M. -Students at the Guild
House. Dr. Chapman will speak
on:
"How Become A Christian"
Refreshments and Social Hour.

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
MINISTERS: 4
CHARLES W.BRASHARES
and L. LaVERNE FINCH
Music: Achilles Taliaferro
10:45 A.M. --Morning Worship Ser-
vice:
"MY LIFE-
HOW SPEND IT?"
Death or Taxes?
by Dr. Brashares
6:00 P.M.-Wesleyan Guild at Stalk-
er Hall. Miss Mildred E. Sweet,
Secretary at Stalker Hall, will
lead a discussion on "Today's
Challenge to Christian Youth."
Supper and fellowship hour will
follow.

v w.. .ava er vv n u w. .v a.i vaavJ

, -- I--

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SATURDAY SHOWS - MAT. 2 & 4:00 - EVE. 7 & 9
MATINEE 25c - EVENING: ALL SEATS 35c

:00

I 3FA d

1869

1936

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MICHIGIN

CHARLES LAUGHTON CLARK GA
FRANCHOT TONE
IN THE SUPREME ADVENTURE TALE.
ttUTINY

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11
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,

MAKING IT WAS~THE GREAT
ADVENTURE OF THE SCREEN
...SEEING IT WILL BE YOURS!
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million dollars on gorgeous sets to be blown to bits and
giant ships to be sent to the bottom of the seas-at last it's ready
to sweep before your eyes this blazing story of the glorious ren-
egade who fought 'the king's armada to win a woman's kiss!
Wart 3r... pmr.t RAFAEL SABATINI'S w .rta-taf.b :e.ate'

Just A Few Days Left To
BEGIN SAVING NOW
FOR NEXT CHRISTMAS

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