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January 29, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-29

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P'AGE 'TWO

THE~ MtTTCXN rDXT[

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1936

State Furniture
Business Topic
of Air Address
Professor Hammett Tells
Story Of Grand Rapids'
Rise To Leadership
Prof. Ralph W. Hammett of the
school of architecture continued the
"Michigan, My Michigan" series of
talks over WJR yesterday through
the University Broadcasting Service,
speaking on furniture making in
Michigan.
"Furniture making is Michigan's
oldest major industry," he began,
adding that this state "stands at the
head of the list" in this industry.
Describing Grand Rapids as "the fur-
niture city" of Michigan, he said,
"Most American furniture design
originates there, for Grand Rapids
sets the pace in the latest in furni-
ture fashion."
Professor Hammett described the
furniture expositions that are held
in Grand Rapids semi-annually, at
which the new models of furniture are
displayed. "These furniture mar-
kets," he declared, "cover more area
than the National Automobile Shows
and upwards of 200 manufacturers,
leaders in the industry, display their
models of new furniture." They are,
however, he wept on, open only to re-
tailers with proper identification.
Turning to the story of the rise of
Grand Rapids to furniture fame, Pro-
fessor Hammett related how the com
bination of Dutch immigrant crafts-
men and enterprising and commer-
cially ambitious Yankees from the
northeastern states combined to bring
the city to supremacy. The fact tha
"these old pioneer furniture makers
of Grand Rapids made such good fur -
niture, better than the usual small
town cabinet makers could supply"
and that such beautiful woods as wal-
nut, cherry and maple abounded in
Michigan, had much to do with this
rise, the speaker declared. "Mich-
igan had the advantage in the early
days," he said, "and the good name
which these early furniture manufac-
turers acquired from the very start,
with very few exceptions, has been
kept to the present time."
The furniture industry, Professor
Hammett continued, has been intro-
duiced into almost every state in the
union, but the attempts have not
caught on. Several times furniture
marts have been established in other
cities and millions of suites of shod-
dily-made furniture introcuced, he
said, but these attempts to overthrow
the Grand Rapids' position have not
succeeded. "Not a single Michigan
manufacturer has stooped to lessen
the quality of his product" Professor
Hammett emphasized.
Lincoln League Is
Pushed By Faculty
(Continued from Page 1)
plications were expected to swell the

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

6:00-WJR Buck Rogers.
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Dinner Music.
CKLW Omar.
CRCW Overseas Progra]
WMBC One Hour's Musi
WEXL Dinner Music.
s6:15-WJRtMusical AMoment
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30-WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Rhythm Rambii
WJBK Today's Winners.
CRCW Twilight Moods.
WEXL Variety.
6 :45-WJR Silhouettes.
WWJ Musical Moments.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CKT.,W Old Bill.
WJBK Clyde Y. Fenner
WEXL Polish Program.
7 :00-WJR Myrt and Marge.
WWJ Amos 'n' Andy.
WXYZ Easy Aces.
CKLW Shadows on the
WJBK Evening Serenad
CROW Farnham's Music
WMBC Harvesters.
7:15 - WJR Adventures of J
WWJ Evening Melodies.
WXYZ Captain Tim.
CKLW Laugh Parade.
WJBK Reporter.
CROW Across the Bay.
7:30--WJR Kate Smith.
WWJ Studio Hour.
WXYZ Lone Ranger.
CKLW Sunset Nocturne,
WJBK Billy Repaid.
CRCW Young Tim.
WMCB Bob Evans.
'7:45-WJR Boake Carter.
CROW Presenting.
WJBK Ray Dauberger.
WMBC Board of Educat
WEXL Polish Program.
8 :00-WJR "Cavalcade of Ar
WWJ One Man's Family
WXYZ Rendezvous.
CKLW Sweet and Hot.
WJBK Southeastern Ole
CRCW Knights of Glad:
8 :15-WJBK Round Up.
WMBC Ukranian Hour.
S:30-WJR Burns and Allen
t'Y7' ,T WJ.ayne King's Mt
WXYZ Frank Simon's C
uKuW Metropolitan Mo
CR(IW Musical Program
WJBK Smith's Ensembl
WMBC Records.
:45-WMBC Polish Hour.
WJBK Book Talk.
WEXL Ted Zajac.
,-l _tt T ily Pons.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29, 1936.
Andre Kostelantez' Music.
WWJ Town Hall Tonight.
WEXL Corn Cob Pipe Club.
CKL W Rick Roberts' Revellers
m. WJBK Ernest Minchella.
c. 9:30-WJR Ray Noble's Music.
CROW Road to Yesterday.
s WXYZ Twenty Thousand Years in
Sing Sing.
CKLW Sinfonietta.
I WJBK Organ and Violin.
CRCW Book Parade.
ngs. 10:00-WJR Gang Busters.
I WWJ Gov. Alfred M. Landon.
WXYZ John Charles Thomas.
CKLW Husbands and Wives.
WJBK Popular tunes.
CROW Club Thirteen.
WMBC Baker Twins.
WEXL Brass Ensemble.
WEXL Roy and Harry.
10:15-WJBK Melodious Melodies.
10 :30-WJR March of Time.
WXYZ Musical Moments.
Clock. CKLW Grand Opera.
e. CRCW Mart Kenny's Music.
WJBK Trafton's Music.
WMBC Reg Webb.
immy Allen WEXL Voice of Safety.
10:45-WJR "Truth" Barlow.
WWJ Radio Jake.
WXYZ Gray Gordon's Music.
CROW Bulletins.
WEXL Hawaiian Music.
11 :00-WJR Bulletins.
WWJ Troupers.
WXYZ Baker Twins.
CKLW Melody Interlude.
W.JBK Dance Music.
CROW Romanelli's Music.
WMBC Dance Music.
11:45-WJR Abe Lyman's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
CKLW Alfred Wallenstein's Music.
ion. WMBC Billy Riddle.
WXYZ Biagini's Music.
merica." 11:30 -WWJ Delbridge's Music.
y. WJR Cloude Hopkins' Music.
WXYZ Lowry Clark.
CKLW Jan Garber's Music.
ee Club. WMBC Midnight Sunshiners.
ness. 11:45-WJR Solay.
WXYZ Enoch Light's Music.
CKTW Anson Weeks' Music.
11:00-WJR Charles Dornberger's Music.
usic. WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
oncert Band. CKLW Hal Kemp's Music.
ods9. WXYZ Shandor: To Be Announced.
., WJBK Night Owl.
e. WEXL Moonlight Broadcaster.
12:30-WJR Henry Halstead's Music.
WXYZ Enric Madrigeurra's Music.
CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
-:00-CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
1 ?P,--CfIT W Will Osborne's Music.

200 Supervisors
Will Hear Talk
BI Fitzoerald
By'
Lansing Convention Opens
With Report On Affairs
Of State
LANSING, Jan. 28.- (JP) -Some
200 members of Michigan boards of
supervisors assembled here today in
annual convention to hear a report
on state affairs by Governor Fitz-
gerald.
The interest of delegates in the
opening session of the state associa-
tion of supervisors of Michigan was
divided between the remarks they
expected from the governor, and a
gathering demand that the rural
districts be given more generous sums
for educational purposes.
The goverflor indicated he would
review his accomplishments in office
and deliver a brief outline of the
things he hopes to accomplish.
Eugene B.pElliott, state superin-
tendent of public instruction, is to
follow the governor in an address on
"Public School Finances." A period
on the program marked 'discussion'
opened the way for rural supervisors
to tell the superintendent of their
home district problems and to de-
mand more funds for the future.
Tomorrow the storm surrounding
the administration of relief in Mich-
igan is expected to break. Supervis-
ors who participated in the so-called
"welfare fund rebellion" of last fall
were prepared to blast the federal
ultimatum that they must contribute
to a joint federal-state-county relief
fund in amounts that federal author-
ities consider adequate or be denied
federal benefits. The suspension of
Allegan county from federal aid for
its welfare problem ended the re-
bellion last fall, but visitors indicated
today that they "took it but we will
tell somebody that we did not like it."
Dr. William Haber, state emer-
gency relief administrator, is pro-
gramed for an address tomorrow
forenoon. Here. too, the notation
"discussion" on the program opened
the way for dissatisfied supervisors
to air their views.
FIRE LOSS GREAT
UNION CITY, Ind., Jan. 28. --G)
-Fire of unknown origin that start-
edi1 in a nliirinF- shoe)basement in

AS EADVERTISING

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisement" with Classified
kdvertisin g Depart menit. Phone 2-1214.
Te kclassifiec columns close at five
)'clock previous to daiy of insertion.
Box numbers :ay be secured at on
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Cash in advance l11 per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions. 10c
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Minium 3 lines per i-
sertion.
telephone rate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
0$1 discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Ply contract, p1r line -2 lines daily,
one month.. .............c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ........8c.
2 lines daily, college year......7c
4 lines E.O.1D., 2 months..... ..Sc
100 lines used as desired . ..9c
300 lines used as desired.........Sc
1,000 lines used as desired ........7c
2.000 lines used as desired.....6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
Bc per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bald face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
,apital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type

FOR RENT -ROOMS
APPROVED double or single room,
light and well furnished with stu-
dent desks. 1117 Forest Ave. 252
SUITE with private bath and shower.
Accommodates three available now.
Also double room with adjoining
lavatory, steam heat, shower bath.
Dial 8544. 422 E. Washington.
250
TWO SUITES, one block from cam-
pus. Phone 2-3738. 238
FOR RENT: Front suite, for women,
across from campus, 703 Haven
Avenue. Phone 7225. 237
DESIRABLE single, also double with
twin beds. Shower bath. 1102 Pros-
pect. Phone 6472. 248
FOR RENT: Desirable room, 2nd
floor. Three other roomers, 421
Thompson St. Mrs. C. H. Eaton.
245
THIRD floor triplicate, running water
$2.50 each. Second floor exquisite
suite $5.00 each. 928 Church.
241

FOR SALE

TAILS and tuxedo or both. Size 39
Very reasonable. For information
call 2-1214. Box 112. 253
TWO TUXEDOS for sale 1 size 40, 1
size 37. Good condition, cheap. Call
at 721 N. University. Telephone
9495. 249
MEDICAL students for eugenic books.
Give name, address, age and phone
number to Box 110 or phone 3059.
235
WANTED
WANTED: 300 copies Scheville-His-
tory of Europe. Highest CASH
prices paid at The College Book-
shop. State St. at North University.
240
Nurse Rescues
Children From
Hospital Blaze

---

Alumni Hear Ruthven Speech,
EvenThough He's In Hospital
o -

NOTICES
JELLY ROLL MORTON and his Har-
lem Swing band. Open for J-Hop
after parties, etc. Phone 2-1541,
121 E. Ann St. 244
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M. grad-
uate, 44 years practice. 549 Pack-
ard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
d lox
LOST AND FOUNDT
LOST: Friday. Rimiess glasses in
black case, by Weaver Optometrist.
$5.00 reward. Box 111. 251
LOST: Frat pin. Alpha Chi Sigma.
Initials E. H. H. Reward. Call Had-
ley at 546 Walnut, Phone 6226.
246

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. . 6x

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

darned.
Ix

Professor Bartlett
Back From Manila
Prof. Harley H. Bartlett, chairman
of the botany department, returned
Monday to Ann Arbor after teaching
in the University of the Philippines
in Manila.
Prof. Jose K. Santos was a member,
of the faculty here to take the place
of Professor Bartlett when he left
Jan. 1, 1935. For the past few years
the University and the University of
the Philippines have exchanged pro-
fessors for the second semester of each
;chool year.

Eleven Saved But Two
Die As Rush Memorial
Pavilion Burns
MALVERN, Pa., Jan. 28. - (P) -
Seventeen children owed their lives
today to a nurse and other persons
who rescued them from a fire which
burned to death two six-year-old
boys in a wooden pavilion of the Rush
Memorial hospital for consumptives
here.
The children and the nurse, Miss
Helen Rittenhouse, were asleep last
night when the pavilion burst into
flames. She was awakened by the
smoke, however, in time to start
carrying out the children.
Hospital attendants and passing
motorists quickly came to her aid, but
before the rescue work could be
completed, the structure collapsed.
The hospital, outside the town, has
no fire hydrants in the vicinity. Fire-
men chopped ice from a pond nearby
in a vain attempt to get water.

Appleton Group Is Given
Phonographic Reply To
Request From Abbot
By E. BRYCE ALPERN
They may talk about the wonders
of science and of modern miraculous
inventions, but all these dwindle into
insignificance when compared to the
fact that President Alexander G.
Ruthven spoke to the Alumni Club!
of Appleton, Wis., while he was in
the hospital, and didn't even know it.
Not only did President Ruthven
speak to this Alumni Club, but also
Coach Harry Kipke and Prof. Ar-
thur Cross of the history department
addressed the assembly without
knowing it.
Thisnseemingly impossible event
was not a result of a miracle, but
only of the new recording equipment
which has recently been installed in
the Broadcasting Studio in Morris
Hall.
At 11 a.m. last Friday, Prof. Waldo
Abbot, director of broadcasting, re-
ceived the following telegram from'
Appleton: "Forward records for use
Michigan Club organization meeting
next Tuesday." Knowing that Presi-
dent Ruthven was in the hospital,
and unable to locate Coach Kipke,
Professor Abbot was hard up for
speakers for his records.
After pondering a moment, how-
ever, Professor Abbot searched
through his files of records and ex-
tracted three: a speech given pre-
viously before another alumni group
by President Ruthven, a talk given
by Coach Kipke just before the Co-
lumbia game last year, and a speech
made by Professor Cross concerning
the growth of the University.
Standing before the microphone in
the recordiig room, Professor Ab-
bot, with the recording apparatus set
in motion, introduced President
-- Today & Thursday
Frank Morgan
Maureen O'Sullivan
"THE BISHOP MISBEHAVES"

Ruthven, and then ran off the record
of his former speech, thus obtaining
one complete record, with speech and
introduction upon it. Using the
~ame procedure, he made records of
the other two speakers.
Hunting again in his files, Profes-
sor Abbot selected recordings of num-
bers played by the band and the
glee club, including the selections,
"The Yellow and the Blue" and the
"Victors."
'Lady In Red' Asks
MichiganFor Debt
LANSING, Jan. 28. - (W) -- A Chi-
cago attorney called upon the state
of Michigan today to pay its debt
to "the lady in red."
Thomas J. Johnson, Jr., of Chicago,
wrote Gov. Fitzgerald that he repre-
sents Mrs. Anna Sage, who is cred-
ited with pointing out John Dillinger
to federal agents before a Chicago
theatre July 22, 1934. Dillinger died
in the gun battle which followed.
Mrs. Sage won her cognomen from
the flaming clothes she wore. John-
son told the governor she already
has collected a reward from the fed-
eral government and pointed out that
former Gov. William A. Comstock had
joined the governors of Ohio, Indiana,
Illinois and Minnesota in promising
$5,000 reward for Dillinger's appre-
hension.

1

r;

*1

I

i
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the business district here early today
destroyed three two-story buildings
causing a loss estimated by insurance
officials at $175,000.

A

DAILY 15c to 6 - 25c after 6
CONTINUOUS 1:30 - 11 P.M
Last Times Today
FIRST LOCAL SHOWING!
ALLISON SKIPWORTH
MAE CLARKE
"Hitch Hike Lady"
and
RALPH MORGAN
MAXINE DOYLE
"Condemned To
Live"
Extra
LOWELL THOMAS
NEWS 1I CARTOON
-- Thursday
Tom Brown & Marian Nixon
"SWEEPSTAKE ANNIE"
A_ -- _and
Charles Starrett
"A SHOT IN THE DARK"'

total considerably.-
Frank B. Devine, chairman of the
county Republican committee de-
clared that the organization was
"non-partisan" insofar as particular
candidates, were concerned. Support
will be given the Republican party as
a whole. After the primaries, sup-
port of particular Republican candi-
dates will be undertaken, however.
The local Lincoln League has no con-
nection with other such leagues exist-
ing in Kalamazoo and other cities
throughout the state," he said. "It
was formed spontaneously in this city
by those who felt that the present
administration is undesirable."
The League is planning a Lincoln's
Day banquet on Feb. 12 at the Ma-
sonic Temple. It will be the first of-
ficial action of the organization, and
more than 600 people are expected to
attend. League officials are attempt-
ing to obtain Claris Adams, president
of the Michigan League of Republican
Clubs, as the principal speaker.

PRINTING
LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, STATIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS,
Downtown, North of Postoffice

r

f

U

IWA

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NOW
SHOWING

*" t
" ' 1
i

SPECIAL DANCING
CLASS
beginning Thursday at
8 P.M. Enroll Now at
Terrace Garden Danc-
ing Studio, in Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695.

I

also Peter Lorre

"CRIME & PUNISHMENT"

i

I

- ENDS TONIGHT! -
JEAN HARLOW SPENCER TRACY UNA MERKLE
in the Hilarious Comedy Drama
"RIFF RAFF"

Their lovs
...rose abo
of mortal
#. Zukor
presents
INN
The Most Beautifull

Matinee Daily
2 & 3:30 25c
Evening 7 & 9
25c & 35c
10118y
nai r
Atraur

ve towered above the w
ve the trials and tribulat
life.. ,triumphant...eter
~HflR UN

Also Walt Disney Cartoon

Pete Smith Sportlight

News

TOMORROW
"MUTI NY
ON TEE

Love Story in All Modern L

III

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