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January 23, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

-THlE MICDIGXN DILY V

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1939

Regents Accept
Resignation Of
Prof. Copeland
Frank Knight Of Chicag
To Give Lectures During
Second Semester
The resignation of Prof. Morris A
Copeland of the economics depart-
ment has been accepted by the Boar
of Regents, and Prof. Frank H. Knigh
of the University of Chicago, a wel
known economist, will be visiting lec-
turer in economics for the second se-
mester.
Professor Copeland resigned i
order to become executive secretar
of the central statistics committee i
Washington, D.C., and his resigna.
tion took effect immediately. Pro-
fessor Knight will partially fill the
vacancy and will teach a course fo:
graduates. He will commute eacl-
week between Ann Arbor and Chi-
cago.
Because of the request of Regent
R. Smith and the inability of Presi-
dant Alexander Ruthven to attend th
January meeting of the Regents, i
was postponed. The appointmen
was made by the executive commit-
tee ac.ting for the Regents and was
approved by the other members.
Prof. George G. Ross of the land-
scape design department was giver
leave of absence from Jan. 20 for the
remainder of the school year by the
Regents' committee. He was invited
by the Federal government to take
charge of a resettlement project in
Milwaukee, Wis. Nearly 5,000 acres
will be developed under the direction
of Professor Ross, and after this pro-
ject has been started, he will be in
charge of resettlement undertakings
in various parts of the United States.
Mr. Joyce Morton Frissel will fill
the vacancy caused by the absence
of Professor Ross.
Dr. Howard H. Cummings of Ann-
Arbor was appointed assistant direct-
or of post-graduate medicine in the
Medical School. Mrs. Violet Hanley,
noted woman golfer from Detroit,
was appointed assistant in the de-
partment of physical education for
the second semester.
Two gifts were received by the Re-
gents. An anonymous donor gave
$7,200 for support of aboriginal North
American ceramics research in the
Museum of Anthropology. From this
gift :$2,400 will be given to support
the work for the next three years.
The Federation of Paint and Var-
nish Products awarded a second se-
mester scholarship to Neville F. Mil-
ler, Grad., Detroit.
Professor Knight, who will be a
visiting lecturer, has been a full pro-
fessor at the University of Chicago
since 1928 and is the author of sev-
eral well known economic books. He
wrote "Risk, Uncertainty and Profit,"
and translated Max Weber's "General
Economic History."
15 Men Chosen
For '36 Varsity
Debate Team
Results of the eliminations held to
select the Varsity men's debating
squad were announced yesterday by
Arthur E. Secord, debating coach.
The men were selected on the basis
of their performance in giving a two-
minute agrumentative speech on any
phase of a question published in last
week's Daily relative to a shift of
powers from the Supreme Court to
Congress.
Out of the 37 men who tried out
the following 15 were selected as
members of the Varsity men's debat-

ing squad: Collins E. Brooks, '37; Leo
R. Burson, '36; Wililam A. Centuer,
'38; Clifford Christenson, '37; Swift
Corwin, '37; Herbert J. Gibbs, '38; C.
Eugene Gressman, '38; J. Cameron
Hall, '36; Reid J. Hatfield, '39; David
Hertzberg, '39; David May, '38; Rob-
ert Rosa, '39; Richard Samuels, '39;
Harry Shniderman, '38; and Sey-
mour Spelman, '39.
The squad's first debate this semes-
ter will be held Feb. 21 with Man-
chester College in North Manchester,
Ind. The question to┬░ be debated is:
"Resolved: That Congress Should
Have the Power bY a Two-thirds Vote
to Override Decisions of the Supreme
Court Declaring Acts of Congress Un-
constitutional."

Backers Of Bonus Celebrate Passage Through Congress

Classified Directory

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ADVERTISING
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oclock previous to day of insertion.
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The above rates are for 7% point
Lype.
WANTED
TUTOR wanted: For E. M. 2. Box 108.
217
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAtJNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
Students Vote Old
Fashioned Girls

NOTICES
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service.Allnew cabs. 3x
DRESSMAKING: J-Hop formals, al-
terations carefully done. 1208 S.
University. Phone 2-2020. 213
STATIONERY: Printed with your
nome and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
REFINED student girl can have room
in faculty home for services. Phone
5519. 226
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
10x
FOR SALE.
APPLES, 50c bushel and up. Clean
fruit. Filtered cider. Phone 3926.
Will deliver, 1003 Brooks St.
225
FOR SALE: New clarinet and one
new complete set of Ludwig traps
and drums. Call 6757. 224
FOR RENT -ROOMS
TWO ROOM suite, 2nd floor front.
Large and light. 3 blocks from
campus. Phone 6537. 227
FOR RENT: Suite for three boys. Also
board. 514 E. Jefferson Street.
Phone 2-3371.

Society To Honor
Hopwood Winners
The six students whose poetry
ranks highest in the Hopwood poetry
contest for freshmen will be given
memberships in the College Poetry
Society of America for one year, it
was announced yesterday by Carlton
F. Wells of the English department.
This additional award entitles the
contest winners to membership in the
Michigan chapter of the society and
carries with it a year's subscription
to the magazine, "College Verse." Ex-
penses incurred by this additional
award will be met by the Hopwood
Room Fund, -it was stated.
The deadline for manuscripts to
be entered in the freshman contest is
Friday, Jan. 31, at 4:00 p.m.

I

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-Associated Press Photo
Advocates of the cash bonus for war veterans are shown as they celebrated passage of the bill through the
Senate. Left to right: Legion Commander Murphy; Sen. Steiwar, Oregon, co-author of the bill; J. T. Taylor,
American Legion; Sen. Byrnes, South Carolina, co-auther; James Van Zandt and G. K. Brobeck, Veterans of
Foreign Wars; M. A. Harlan, of Disabled Veterans; and Sen. Reynolds of South Carolina.

DAILY 15 to 6 25c after 6
CONTINUOUS 1:30 - 11 P.M.
Last Day
SHIRLEY GREY
SIDNEY BLACKMER
"GIRL WHO
CAME BACK"
-__AND
JACKIE COOPER in
""DI NKY"'
- _-- EXTRA
Cartoon VAUDEVILLE
"LADY IN RE" NOVELTY
Friday - Saturday
"CRIME OF "MAN FROM
DR. CREsPIl 'GUNTOWN"

aColumbia Research Professor

Graduate School Position
Allows Intensive Study
Of Elizabethan Dramaj
One of the most distinguished men
on the University faculty, Prof. Oscar'
J. Campbell of the English depart-
ment will leave after the examina-
tion period -for New York City where
he will assume the position of research
professor in Elizabethan drama at
Columbia University's graduate
school.
In an interview yesterday, Profes-
sor Campbell said no single consid-
eration had prompted his action. He
stated, however, that the fewer hours
which he will have to devote to ac-
tual teaching had contributed to-
ward his acceptance of the new post.
In this connection, he added that the
facilities for research in Elizabethan
drama which Columbia affords and
the greater amount of time he will
be able to spend in research were also
contributory.
Professor Campbell declined to
comment on the question of whether
criticism of the University adminis-
tration had a place in his decision
to leave: He added that he did notE
know whether other prominent fac-
ulty men were planning to accept of-
fers from other institutions.
At Columbia, Professor Campbell1
will occupy the position formerly
held by Prof. Ashley Thorndike of
Columbia University, a noted author-
ity on the drama who died recently.
Since he was first engaged as pro-
fessor in the University more than
14 years ago, Professor Campbell
has inspired the respect and admira-
tion of his students and colleagues.
His lectures on Shakespeare and the
Elizabethans have especially merited
highly enthusiastic comment.
He was a student at the University
from 1898 to 1900, received the Bach-
elor of Arts degree from Harvard in
1903, the master of arts degree in
1907 and the Doctor of Philosophy de-
gree in 1910. He then studied at
Heller Will Speak
For Alumni., oup
Dr. Bernaird Heller, director of the
Hillel Foundation of the University,
will be the speaker for the Detroit
Alumni Club of Zeta Beta Tau fra-
ternity tonight at the monthly meet-j
ing of the group.
Dr. Heller, as guest speaker for the
program will discuss "Judaism and
the Jewish Fraternity." The meet-
ing will be held at the Belcrest Hotel
in Detroit.

Copenhagen, Berlin, Paris, and at
Oxford University as a traveling fel-
low at Harvard.
At the United States Naval Acad-
emy he was instructor in English and
law from 1904 to 1906. He was en-
gaged at the University of Wisconsin,
from 1911 until 1921, when he came
to the University. In 1918 he was
selected by the government to help
collect information on Turkey rela-
tive to the Peace Conference. He
was president of the National Coun-
cil of Teachers, and while holding this
position wrote "The Teaching of Eng-
lish in American Colleges," an im-
portant text.
Professor Campbell said he will
move to New York permanently and
will continue spending the summer
months near Pasadena, Calif., where
he is a research fellow in the Henry
B. Huntington Library.
'Different Tpe
Of KigIs Now.
England's Head
(Continued from Page 1)
were spent on his yacht at seat or in
the quiet English countryside.
Edward VIII, in Professor Cuncan-
non's opinion, is cast in a different
mould. The 38th ruler since William
the Conqueror, his background is
Magdalen College, Oxford and the
war. Calling attention to the fact
that, "like Edward VII," the new king
"loves the continent," the professor
pointed out that "Biarritz and Buda-
pest know him well. He is a man of
great independence of will. He is well
read and well travelled and possessed
of a keen mind. Two trips to Amer-
ica have acquainted him with condi-
tions in this country.
"A more colorful figure than George
V, he is a man of many friends and
great interest in society and human
situations," Professor Cuncannon ad-
vised, although "one wonders wheth-
er he possesses his father's great wis-,
dom and innate tact. His contribu-
tions will probably be in the realm
of foreign affairs rather than in do-
!mestic politics. He is in many ways
typical of the age in which he is
called upon to govern."

Kingr's Funeral
Described By
E H. Fellowes
(Continued from Page 1)
plained, will all be dressed in black
and "this even more tends to show
up the resplendent uniforms of the
officers of state."
Taken from the old English Prayer
Book, the service will not be lengthy,
he remarked, and after the reading
of the "sentences" several moments
of silence will follow.
During this period of silence the
king's casket will slowly and almost
imperceptibly be lowered and grad-
ually drift back behind the altar out
of sight into the royal vault.
"At the funeral of Queen Victoria,"
he remarked, "this was the most im-
pressive moment of the entire service,
and no doubt it will be equally as
impressive at King George's service.
It will be a moment to be remembered
for years and years."
After the coffin has disappeared the
Home Secretary takes the wand of the
Knight of the Garter, steps forward,
and after the words "earth to earth,
dust to dust," are spoken by the
clergy, breaks the wand in two.
Following another brief period of
silence, the procession slowly files out.
"I have seen two coronations of
our kings and also a funeral," he said,
"but the funeral is by far the most
impressive service I have ever seen."
"You in America can hardly realize
what it is to have a king," Dr. Fel-
lowes concluded, "but to the English
he is the symbol uniting the entire
empire and the heterogeneous peoples
of which it is composed."
"I thought when I started on my
journey to your country that the
death of King George might occur,"
he remarked. "He was a fine king
and I am sorry that I shall not be
at Windsor to pay him tribute."

. MICHIGAN

NOW

1ack into

Style

WASHINGTON, Jan. 22. -()-The
"old-fashioned" girl has come into her
own once more with college students,
a survey at Catholic University shows.
The majority of 35 seniors in one
class say they will pick the type
that dad loved for their life compan-
ions.
Only one man said that "good
looks" would determine his choice of
a wife, while 11 said that "moral char-
acter" would influence them most.
Wealth did not seem to matter much.
One mentioned it as a last considera-
tion.
College women did not seem to be
in such demand as educators would
like to believe, in this vote. There
were no votes registered for college
women as first in importance, none
for second or third, and only one for
fourth place. A definite distinction
was made between "intelligence and
education."
Last Times Today
"ESCAPE FROM DEVIL'S
ISLAND"
and
"HERE'S TO ROMANCE"
Friday - Saturday
"Case of the Lucky Legs"
"Whispering Smith Speaks"
"ROARING WEST" No. 8

- Also
Thelma Todd - Patsy Kelly
in "TWIN TRIPLETS"
Color Cartoon II I News

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