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January 12, 1936 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-12

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

SUNJ)AY, JANUARY 12, 193C PAGE FIVE

Wyvern Group W ill Sponsor

Meetings

For

Freshman Women Here

n-

Honor Society
To Hold Series
Of Luncheons
Noon Meetings Conducted
By Wyvern Are To Start
Tuesday AtLeague
Members To Speak
Activities To Be Explained
To Freshmen Women In
Six Meetings
The first in a series of luncheon
meetings to be given for freshmen
women under the auspices of
Wyvern, junior honor society, will be
held at noon Tuesday in the north-
east alcove of the League Grill. The
purpose of these meetings is to ex-
plain women's activitiesaElsie Pierce,
'37, president said late last night.
During the first meeting Tuesday,
the Freshman Project, Sophomore
Cabaret and Junior Girls' Play will
be discussed. Members of Wyvern
who have been and are active in
these fields will point out to the
freshmen the duties connected with
committee jobs and means by which
the productions are put into shape.
Maryanna Chockley, Edith Zerbe and
Betty Anne Beebe are in charge of
this meeting.
Merit System
The second luncheon discussion
group will be held Thursday. This
meeting will include a discussion on
the merit system and its importance
in League activities and on honorary
societies. Mary Potter and Billie
Faulkner are to lead the discussion.
The third meeting to be held Tues-
day, Jan. 21 will be on publications.
Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Rueger, Char-
lotte Hamilton and Jewel Wuerfel
will take charge of this discussion
group.
The other three luncheon meet-
ings will include one on the social
and house reception committees
headed by Betty King, Jane O'Ferrall
and Grace Snyder. Lois King, Mary
Lambie and Miss Pierce will take
charge of Play Production and the
theatre arts committee which in-
cludes the Children's Theatre.
Non-Affiliated Women
The last meeting will be held for
activities limited to non-affiliated
women, including discussions of the
Assembly. Mary Andrew and -Gret-
chen Lehmann will be in charge.
This series of luncheons which will
be held every Tuesday and Thursday
for the next three weeks is to enable
freshmen women to learn the fields
of the different activities and to help
them to determine which ones they
are especially interested in entering.
The meetings will be informal so
that any questions may be asked.
All freshmen women are urged to
attend as many of the luncheons they
are interested in, according to Miss
Pierce, president.
Afternoon Tea
Is Given For
Mrs. Hosmer
A tea was given from 4 to 6 p.m.
yesterday in the League by Mrs. Eliz-
abeth M. Cunningham honoring Mrs.
John Alden Hosmer, the former Alice
C. Cleveland.
The marriage of the former Miss
Cleveland and Dr. John Hosmer was
announced by the bride's mother.
Mrs. Charles Wilford Cleveland. It

took place Jan. 19, 1934, at Angola,
Ind. The couple is to make their
home in Ann Arbor.
Dr. Hosmer is the son of Dr. and
Mrs. Andrew J. Hosmer, Midvale,
Utah, and is assistant resident in
surgery in the University hospital. He
received both his degrees of bachelor
and doctor of medicine at Michigan.
Pouring at the tea tables yesterday
were: Mrs. Herman Hildner and Miss
Dorothy Romero. Other guests at
the reception included intimate
friends of Mrs. Hosmer.
SOCIAL WELFARE GROUP
The department of government and
social welfare of the League of Wom-
en Voters will meet at 9:30 a m. to-
morrow in the League. The room
will be designated by the bulletin
board.

New Evening Frock Uses Black Velvet Trim

Watkins' Band
To Be Starred
At Union Dance
Outstanding Orchestra Is
To Play Here Often; No
Price Increase
Sammy Watkins and his National
Broadcasting Orchestra will be fea-
tured at the regular Union dance to
be held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 17
in the "Rainbow Room" at the Union.
Watkins and his band in the past
few years have become very well
known and have played in New York,
Detroit, Chicago, Pittsburgh and in
many night clubs, hotels and summer
resorts throughout the country. They
have been especially popular in the
Middle-West.
Union officials stated last night
that Watkins would be the first out-
side band to ever appear in the
"Rinbow Room," and that the spon-
soring of his orchestra was part of
the new policy of the student organ-
ization of bringing in an outstand-
ing orchestra for the weekly dances
at least once each month.
There will be no increase in price
of tickets for the dance, it was em-
phasized, but officials urged everyone
to make reservations early because
only a limited number of tickets are
to be sold.
It was only a few years ago that
Watkins organized his band, and its
first appearances .were made in De-
troit. Following this engagement, he
played in Cleveland, Dallas, Nash-
ville, and Asbury Park, N. J.
Recent engagements of Watkins
and his band include the Schroeder
Hotel in Milwaukee, Webster Hall in
Detroit, the William Penn Hotel in
Pittsburgh. A few weeks ago Watkins
was first sponsored over a national
hookup.
Where To Go
Theatre: Michigan, "I Dream Too
Much" with Lily Pons; Whitney,
"Frisco Waterfront" with Ben Lyon
and "Dangerous Intrigue" with Ralph
Bellamy; Wuerth, "I Live My Life"
with Joan Crawford and "To Beat the
Band" with Hugh Herbert; Orpheum,
"Heldorado" with Richard Arlen and
"College Scandal" with Arlene Judge;
Majestic, "Magnificent Obsession"
with Irene Dunn.
Exhibitions: Isochromatic exhibi-
bition of paintings, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.,
Memorial Hall.
A.A.U.W. MEETING
"The Emergent Aim and Psycho-
logical Purpose of Secondary Educa-
tion" is to be the topic of the discus-
sion which will be led by Albert But-
ler, principal of Tappan school, at a
meeting of the junior high school
child study group of the American
Association of University Women, to
be held at 7:45 p.m. tomorrow in the
University Elementary school.

To Play

At Union

Engagement Of
Ann Arbor Girl
Is Announced
Announcing the engagement of
their daughter, Dorothy Lucille Wal-
ker, to Nelson Vernard Seegar, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Seeger of 272
Crest Avenue, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred G.
Walker entertained at a small party
last night at their home in Ann Ar-
bor.
The engagement was cleverly an-
nounced by means of small favors in
the form of tiny nosegays to which
rings were tied. No date has yet been
set for the wedding.
Miss Walker is a graduate of the,
University and while a student was
affiliated with Sigma Kappa sorority.
Mr. Seeger is attending the Univer-
sity now, and will receive a degree in
chemistry in June.
MOTHERS CLUB TO MEET
The Mothers Club of Alpha Delta
Pi sorority will hold a meeting at 2
p.m. tomorrow at the home of Mrs.
John Shepard.
JEWELRY and

SAMMY WATKINSl
Orchestra Leader
Gets His Start In
Local Appearance
Fred Waring, noted orchestra
leader, got his start right here in Ann
Arbor and from no less a person
than Jerry Hoag, manager of the
Michigan Theatre.
It was back in 1924 that Waring,
a relatively unkown musician, was
playing here at the J-Hop party. Hoag
happened to be present and liked the
music.
The next day, he relates, he looked
up Waring and asked him to play at
the Majestic Theatre that night.
Waring didn't know. He had never
been on the stage, but because he
wanted to try it, he accepted Hoag's
offer.
On his first appearance, Hoag says,
Waring was very well received by
Majestic patrons. After returning
to the East, Waring rapidly gained
in popularity and soon became one
of thenation's foremost dance band
leaders.
And yet, Hoag says, he always re-
members his first stage engagement
at the Majestic.
TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB
The Twentieth Century club will
meet at 1 p.m. tomorrow at the homel
of Mrs. Arthur Van Sickle.

DRAMA GROUP TO MEET
Mrs. William R. Taylor will en-
tertain the Monday evening Drama
club which will meet at 7:45 p.m.
tonight at the Taylor residence.
Further Sensational Reduc-
tions and Additional Values
Are Offered in Our Great-
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Sweaters $1.39, $2.39
Blouses. $1.00, $2.00
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ATCH REPAIRING
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-Associateca Press Pnoto.
Of filmy black tulle is this evening dress created by Chanel for
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kitting it fall over the shoulders to the floor. Big circles of black velvet
give the front a striking trim.

Serious Attempts Musical
Comedy Composers Unpop
By ELSIE A. PIERCE what vulgar and daring by
The comic operas of Gilbert and London. The story is often
Sullivan are the work of two men Windt said, that when a fri(
who both felt they were wasting their him "How's Bloody Gore?
time on musical comedy, and that glowered at the man and s,
they should direct their talent along mean Ruddigore?" "Same t
higher lines, Valentine B. Windt, di- friend replied. Gilbert
rector of "Ruddigore," the Gilbert "Indeed? Then if I say7
and Sullivan operetta to be presented your ruddy countenance, wt
here next week, said yesterday. it means I admire your bloo
Composes Serious Music which I don't."
Gilbert, who wrote the librettos for Sir Arthur Sullivan wa
their joint productions, fancied him- opposite in temperament. F
self as a great playwright of plays younger than Gilbert, h
with a high social aim, Mr. Windt gentle and pleasant gentler
said, but although he was a stern was a member of the hiE
moralist, the audiences refused to ciety of London, and was
take him seriously and laughed at at an early age by Queen
everything he wrote. Sir Arthur who often praised his wor
Sullivan, who composed the music The two men were bro
for the operettas, is also the author gether by friends, and whe
of "The Lost Chord," and "Onward, showed Sullivan his libretto1
Christian Soldiers," songs which he by Jury," Sullivan immedi
considered far greater than any of came interested and wrote t
those he composed for musical com- They worked together for
edy, and he always believed that he years, though they were oft
was wasting his talents. point of breaking off relati
Their operettas were not the pro- ing that time, the Savoy
ducts of a life-long friendship, as so where their operettas were]
many people believe, Mr. Windt re- was always open, for as sac
marked, since they were continually operetta closed another wo
quarreling because each man felt Today the Savoy is still p
himself to be the greater artist of the revivals of Gilbert and Si
two and the only reason they man- Gilbert, in addition to wi
aged to maintain their collaboration librettos, also staged the pr(
was that neither was very successful
working alone.
Gilbert Temperamental
"Gilbert was extremely tempera-
mental, and jealous of his fame. If T
he was offended by a friend, he would I IEI
refuse to speak to the friend for
years," Mr. Windt continued," and
he was never as popular socially as
Sullivan, because he antagonized his sharp winds ay be invigo
friends with his scathing wit." but wintry blasts play
Gilbert was very sensitive about with lovely complexions-
"Ruddigore," the same operetta they're given the proper
which Play Production and the Let LiRETTE'S keep your
School of Music are presenting next ty fresh and lovely.
week, because it was considered some- FACIALS - - MANICUR

ular
Victorian
told, Mr.
end asked
" Gilbert
aid, "You
hing," the
answered,
I admire
hich I do,
dy cheek,
s exactly
Five years
e was a
man, who
ghest so-
knighted
Victoria,
-k.
ought to-
n Gilbert
for "Trial
ately be-
he music.
over 12
en on the
ons. Dur-
Theatre,
presented
on as one
uld open.
presenting
ullivan.
riting the
-ductions.

Now is the time for v
0' you to become
HAIR CONSCIOUS
With J-Hop only four weeks
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new permanent.
Wh weCoeoff till Exam c
weekh C in now to see
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JANUARY
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CURLS AND SWIRLS
PERSONALITY PERMANENTS
Spiral, Croquignole, or
Combination with Shampoo
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* Buy reasonably those
lounging pajamas you
didn't get for Christmas,
Jersey, red coats, with
blue trousers - Green
coats with black trousers,
Aqua marine coat with
black trousers.
Were 5.95, Now $4.75
One-Piece Corduroy
Red, blue, green, brown
Were 3.95, Now $3.15

Don't Take Unnecessary
Chances With a Cold!
GREENE'S EMPLOYEES MUST PASS
RIGID PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS!
PROTECT YOUR CLOTHES
AS WELL AS YOUR FAMILY
GREEN E'S
/""%, CLEANERS 6- DYERS

T he en~io Picture

(.x'IC2ROCLEAN

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