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January 12, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P'AGE' TW6

" 1 IV MI 11XNI DI~tY-

SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 1936

NSL Is Out Of
Existence As An
Individual Unit
Coalition Hopes To Unite
AllExisting Youth Drives
Against War And Fascism
The National Student League,
which last year found itself holding
the campus spotlight on more than

Truck Driver Miraculously Escapes Death In Accident

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

one occasion, exists no more, either
nationally or locally.
Its place in the anti-war and anti-
fascist movement among the young
people of America is to be taken
by the American Student Union, a
coalition organization of members of
the N.S.L., the Student League for
Industrial Democracy, and unaffiliat-
ed sympathizers, formed at a conven-
bon held Dec. 26, 27, and 28 in Co-
lumbus, 0.
According to Fred Brandeis, Grad.,
former executive secretary of the local
N.S.L. chapter who attended the con-
solidation convention, the American
Student Union's program is chiefly
concerned with the following:
"1. United Action against war and
the menace of fascism."
"2. Student cooperation with
workers in resisting the control of
the economic system by a financial
oligarchy."
"3. Action against the Reserve
Officers Training Corps."
"4. A definite stand against race
discrimination."
"5. The support of, complete aca-
demic freedom for teacher and stu-
dent."
"Although the National 'Student
League did not have an avowed 'po-
litical' program," Brandeis pointed
out yesterday, "nevertheless it did
have a political texture.
"The American Student Union -
nationally and on this campus - will
seek to avoid any political committ-
ments.
"The A.S.U. will be open for mem-
bership to anyone who wishes to join
the prospective joiner must merely
subscribe to one or more of the
A. S. U.'s program points. It is not
at all necessary that he espouse them
all."
Brandeis said that in his belief
the American Student Union is "the
type of student organization that
should have been tried long ago." He
added that the A.S.U. was expected
to concentrate on "the large objec-
tives," which he said were opposition
to war and to fascism.
Plans for the formation of an
A.S.U. chapter on the campus are
still sketchy, Brandeis stated. It is
expected, however, that the local unit
will be functioning by the beginning
of the second semester.
Michigan students who attended1
the amalgamation meeting stated
that approximately 450 delegates were
present, representing about equally
the N.S.L. the S.L.I.D., and unaffil-
iated persons. The Michigan dele-
gates said the meeting was charac-
terized by "great enthusiasm," add-
ing that the agenda seemed well
prepared and that discussion on most
of the points was "reasonably com-
plete."
Hauptmann To Die;
Final Plea Denied

i

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ADERISNG
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capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
hype.
WANTED
YOUNG LADY wants housework in
a refined home. Phone 2-1282.
185
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
FOR RENT -ROOMS
DOUBLE ROOM for boys or will rent
singly. Warm, clean. Three blocks
from campus. Call 5269. 184
Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio
Instructions In a11
forms. Classical, social,
dancing. Ph. 9695.
SWuerth Theatre Bldg.

LOST: BOOK - Henry Esmond from STATIONERY: Printed with your
Muskegon Library. Finder please nmne and address. 100 sheets, 100
call Arthur Colman. 3594. 186 envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
LOST: Gray Shaeffer pen and pencil CfPr_____d_
with initials W.F.W. on gold band. MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-

Phone 9501. Reward. 183
LAUNDRY-
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
LAUNDRY, carefully washed in soft
water and hand ironed. Reason-
able. Telephone 7287. lix

cient service. All new cabs. 3x
SEEK BACK PAY
SAGINAW, ,Tan. 11. - (AP) - Fire-
men and poncemen said today they
would take to court their claim for
$30,000 in back pay, representing pay
reductions in 1933 and 1934. The
claim was rejected by the former
city council on its last day in office,
and by the new city council on its
first day.

LOST AND FOUND

NOTICES

'k

D
BEN LYON
Helen Twelvetrees
R"FRISCO
WATERFRONT"
Extra

AILY 15c to 6 - 25c after 6
Continuous 1:30 to 11 P.M.
NOW PLAYING
RALPH BELLAMY
INTRIGUE"
"DANGEROUS

I

-Associated Press Photo
W. C. Derrington, driver of this big trailer truck owes his life to the fact that the trailer refused to
follow the truck over a bridge near Lawrence, Kas. The trailer caught on a post, leaving the cab and driver
dangling over the icy waters of a creek. Derrington crawled from the cab without a scratch.

I

FILM FOLLIES z

LATEST NEWS

CARTOON

Excavations At Dura-Europa On
Euphrates Described By Hopkins

Valuable Parchment And
Papyrus Scrolls Found
In Ancient Ruins
By JEWEL W. WUERFEL
Working with a staff of from six
to eight archeologists and more than
300 Arabs, Prof. Clark Hopkins of
the Latin and Greek department
spent five years digging at the site
of Dura-Europa.
Dura-Europa, situated in Syria on
the Euphrates River, was built by
the Macedonians in 300 B.C., shortly
after the death of Alexander the
Great. Two hundred years later, the
site was captured by the Parthians,
and then in 164 A.D. the Romans
took over the city. It was finally
destroyed in 256 A.D. by the Persians.
Since the coming of the Persians,
the city has never been rebuilt, and,
according to Professor Hopkins, this
fact has been an aid to the arche-
ologists, for they do not have to
contend with the separation of mod-
ern additions from the ancient ruins.
Ruins of the walls of this city of
more than 10,000 inhabitants have
always been visible from the desert
and the French, who have a man-
date over Syria, began the excava-
tion of the site. Yale University be-
ca::me interested in the digging when
a large series of paintings and a
group of parchments and papyri
were discovered. According to Pro-
fessor Hopkins, this is the only site in
Syria where parchment and papyrus
scrolls have been found. Now Yale
University is working in cooperation
with the French Academy of Inscrip-
tions and Letters.
"One of the most interesting ele-
ments is the conflict between the
East and West which is so well re-
flected in the paintings," Professor
Hopkins stated. In continuing, he
explained that there were three parts
to the art, Hellenistic, through the
Macedonians, Eastern, through the
influences of the native people, and
Parthian.
Excavations are begun in the fall

at the end of October and continue
until the first of April. "The rainy
season of the country is an asset to
the digging" according to Professor
Hopkins, "for it enables us to trace
the lines of walls. The walls, made
of dried brick, absorb less water
during the rain than does the loose
sand around them. When the sun
begins to dry out the land, the wall
tracks dry first, leaving a light line
around the sand."
The Arabs who assist in the dig-
ging are efficient workers, especially
considering the amount of food they
consume. After discovering that they
were being paid regularly, they were
very willing to help. Among the
300 working, about half are men who
live in the village and the otherbhalf
are nomads, who pitch their black
goats' hair tents around the excava-
tion grounds during the digging sea-
son, and roam the desert during the
summer.
About one third of the city has
been excavated already. Professor
Hopkins believes that the territory
covered is the most productive. Al-
though other finds will probably be
examples of the type already found,
Yale University plans on continuing
for at least another year.
Professor Hopkins will discuss the
finds of the site in a lecture at 4:15
p.m tomorrow in Room D of Alumni
Memorial Hall, given in the Islamic
Research Seminary series.

Professors Of Surgery
Leave For Convention
Prof. Carl E. Badgley, Dr. Theodore
W. Bywaters, and Dr. Luis J. Ygesias
of the department of surgery in the
Medical School will leave today to at-
tend the four-day convention of the
American Academy of Orthopedics
beginning tomorrow in St. Louis.
They will present a paper on "The
Importance of the Lumbo-Sacral
Joint in Low-Back Pain with Sciatic
Radiation," which is the result of
several years of research, before the
convention.

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9I

Employed men and women accommodated promptly and privately.
Special plans for both single and married people. Repayment in easy in-
stalments maybe extended fromIto 20 months. Come in -write - or'phone.
PEORSON AL FINANCE C PAN"Y
2nd Floor Wolverine Bldg. Room 208
208 EAST WASHINGTON STREET
Phone 4000-4001 Cor. 4th Avenue Ann Arbor

THE
ORATORICAL ASSN.
presents
DOROTHY
THOMPSON
(Mrs. Sinclair Lewis)
Speaking on
"REDISCOVERING
AMERICA"
HILL AUDITORIUM
Thursday, January 23
8:15 p.m.
Tickets at WAHR'S
Prices 75c and 50c

READ THE DAILY'S CLASSIFIED SECTION

NOW PLAYING

9....

(Continued from Page 1)
G. Hoffman to halt Dr. John F.
Condon's South American cruise to
subject him to further questioning
in the Lindbergh kidnap case all but
collapsed tonight.
Attorney-general Harold T. Wil-
entz, who the governor said today
he would ask to have Condon de-
tained, said:
"I have been asked nothing about
D. Condon and nothing will be done
about Dr. Condon."
University Hospital
Has Unusual Scouts
(Continued from Page 1)
again, absolutely reject any kind of
sympathy. That is not what they
are interested in, their doctors will
tell you. What they want is some-
thing to do or somebody to talk to
them. A man with an interesting tale
will hold their attention for an hour,
but to a visitor who wastes his time
(and theirs) by saying: "You poor
boys"; the little fellows retort: "Av,
nuts."

Today - Mon. - Tues.
JOAN CRAWFORD
"I LIVE MY LIFE"
HUGH HERBERT
"TO BEAT THE BAND"
"POOR LITTLE ME" Cartoon
Wed. - Thurs.
CARL BRISSON
"SHIP CAFE"
JOHN BOLES
"REDHEADS ON PARADE"

I

NOW SHOWING
SHOWS CONTINUOUS
TODAY - 1 to 11 P.M.

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RING UP THE CURTAIN!

a'

Oan the dawri

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ELECTRIC SERVICE CO.
offers now as always
The Best in Electrical
Service and Appliances

i

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PHONE 3514

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I[! - __----- -_- -- --- I

PLAY PRODUCTION
and the SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Together with the Department of Physical Education
UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
present
The GILBERT & SULLIVAN COMIC OPERA
"RUDDIGORE"
or "THE WITCH'S CURSE"

BuB
OgS .Stis ~

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elliTA
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S f v tl .. ° A z.. .
tin.
Xi.

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1111

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