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January 11, 1936 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-11

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PAGE TW

r'-- THE MRHVaXN DXILY

SATUIZDAY JANUARY 11, 1936

PAGE TWO SATURDAY JANUARY 11, 193f?

Kiwanis Puts
In Office Nine
New Officials
Chase Installed As District
Governor; Monument
To -Be Erected
A new district governor and eight
lieutenant-governors were installed
yesterday afternoon by the Michigan
District of the Kiwanis Internationale
in its annual mid-winter meeting
held in the Union.
Vernon E. Chase of Dearborn suc-
ceeded Ben Dean of Grand Rapids
into the governorship of the Mich-
igan district. The lieutenant-gov-
ernors installed are John J. Melcher,
Detroit; Carl A. Mitchell, Benton
Harbor; Fred L. Winter, Muskegon;
Ralph M. Hunter, Midland; Bernard
L. Davis, Hillsdale; Howard L. Sped-
ding, Ann Arbor; Jerome V. Dueweke,
Detroit; and Galdwin H. Lewis, Trav-
erse City.
A feature of the meeting was a visit
to the University Hospital to view
the work being done on the recrea-
tional project for underprivileged
ehildren by the Michigan Kiwanis.
Stanley Johnston, of South Haven,
addressed the morning assemblage
on the progress being made in the
development of the 10,000 acre Ki-
wanis forest at East Tawas by the
conservation committee of which Mr.
Johnston is chairman. He said that
a huge monument, composed of gran-
ite stones given by the various di-
visions of the state Kiwanis, would
be erected on the tract.
Warred E. Bow, of Detroit, chair-
man of the district vocational guid-
ance committee, addressed the after-
noon session and told the Kiwanians
of the work being done in the voca-
tional guidance field. He described
the project as aiming to assist youth
in the realization that a long period
of time is necessary to prepare for
a vocation and that an apprentice-
ship must be served.
A panel discussion was held, over
which Arthur E. Pierpant, past gov-
ernor, presided. Frank E. Ellsworth,
of Kalamazoo, told about the Ki-
wanis camp for underprivileged chil-
dren sponsored by the Kalamazoo
club.
Local Doctors
Develop Cure
Of Drug Habit
Patient Enabled To Repel
Opium, Morphine By
Use Of Drug
(Continued from Page 1)
to eradicate that disorder from his
mind.
According to Dr. Klingmann, all
morphine addicts, for example, suf-
fer from an inferiority complex and
from extreme nervousness, which
disappears under the delusions
caused by the drug, which they use
as a form of escape. Science is then
given the task of repairing the pa-
tient's mind so that his complex will
not return and force him once more
into the drug habit.
That such a cure is usually possible,
he bases on the favorable results he
has had in almost all his cases. The
cured patients, he reports, have an
antipathy, rather than a desire fo
the drug they could not previously
avoid. Morphine has even been left
in their rooms without giving them
any temptation to use it again after
the Klingmann method.
In his experience he has found that

addicts are usually eager to have the
habit broken and will cooperate with
authorities to the utmost of their
ability.
The same method has not been ap-
plied in an attempt to cure cocaine
addicts, according to Dr. Klingmann,
because of the fact that cocaine, not
a derivative of the poppy seed, is
basically a different drug from opium
and morphine types.
Anti-New Deal Vote
Up In Digest's Poll
(Continued from Page 1)
80 per cent negatively. Fifteen more
states are in the 60-70 per cent
bracket and the balance of 14 states
are balloting 50-60 per cent against
the Administration's policies.
A close vote is indicated in only
five states, New Mexico with a 53.96
percentage, Oklahoma with a 52.60
percentage and Florida with 50.55 per
cent against the New Deal; Utah
with a 54.10 percentage and Virginia
with a 52.50 per cent vote in support
of the New Deal. All other states give
over a 55 per cent majority for or
against.
NewsEngland, as a section, votes
more than 3 to 1 anti-New Deal so far
in the poll.

Municipal Auditorium Site Of Democratic Convention

Cassflet areeory

CLASSIFIED
A 1DVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
!dvertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at on
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Cash in advance 1lc per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions. t~c
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Minimum 3 lines per in-
sertion.
telephone rate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
0'; discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
13Y contract, per line - 2 lines daily.
one month .......................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ........8c
2 lines daily, college year..7
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100 lines used as desired........9
300 lines used as desired.........8c
1.000 lines used as desired ........ 7c
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The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Conic type, upper and lower case. Add
5c per line to above rates for allscapital
Letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
lac prline toabove rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
Itype.
FOR SALE
FANCY APPLES: Spies, Wagners,
Greenings. Sweet filtered cider.
Will deliver. Phone 3926. 1003
Brooks. 180
WANTED
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. 10x

LAUNDRY
STUDFNT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x

4 FEARED FROZEN
GILLETTE, Wyo., Jan. 10. - VP) -
With discovery of the frozen body
of Tom Wagstaff, rancher and former
British newspaperman, posses search-
ed the snowbound, blizzard swept area
25 miles south of here today for Wag-
staff's three companions.
If your grades average 90 or better,
you will find a job easily, increase
your salary $1,000 a year, say M.I.T.
analysts.

DAILY 1:30 TO 11 P.M. LAST DAY
- Y "PAGE MISS "A FEATHER
GLORY" IN HER HAT
15c To 6 P.M. - 25c After 6
SUNDAY -- TWO FIRST-RUN FEATURES
BEN LYON
RALPH BELLAMY
"F RISCO ,
""F ISI NT RIGU El
WATERFRONT"
- With "DANGEROUS
HELEN TWELVETREES

EXTRA NEWS CARTOON COMEDY

-Associated Press Photo.
The Philadelphia Municipal Auditorium, with a se sting capacity of 13,500, will be the scene of the Demo-
cratic national convention, the national committee me ting in Washington decided when it accepted Phila-
delphia's bid of $200,000 after a spirited "poker game" bidding.

i

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e

NOW
Matinee 25c

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TODAY
Eve. All Seats 35c

Farm Women Content Despite

L. S. To Have

Small Rewards For

Servicel

By BERNARD WEISSMAN
Farm women on the whole are a
contented lot in spite of the relatively
meagre rewards for their services, ac-
cording to the findings of the Rural
Sociology Correspondence Project be-
ing conducted by Prof. Roy H. Holmes
of the sociology department.
. Although he has found that "in
proportion to their contribution to
the national welfare, farm women
. . . . are very poorly rewarded," Pro-
fessor Holmes adds that "in any case.
they are as contented as any other
group in society."
These findings are included in the
January list of conclusions, a set of
which are drawn up each month by
Professor Holmes from the personal
correspondence he is carrying on with
more than 200 rural inhabitants of
the state.
Professor Holmes points out the
peculiar difficultiesconfronting the
farm woman, and asserts that "the
role of farm wife and mother is so
distinctive that every reasonable at-
tempt should be made to prevent
young women assuming that role
without careful deliberation.
"Most wives of farmers have defi-
nite occupational responsibilities in
addition to what properly may be
thought of as the work of house-
keeping."
Stressing the individuality of the
farm woman's tasks, he concludes,
"She is working for herself."
Professor Holmes further declare,
that it seems probable that the ma-
jority of farm women are physically
less able to accomplish without undue
strain the work that falls- to their
lot than in the case with their hus-
bands."
The antagonistic attitude of farm
wcmen to "newcomers" from the city
BANKHEAD WANTS EXPANSION
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10. - W) -
Currency expansion to protect farm
prices was advocated in the Senate
today by Senator Bankhead (Dem.,
Ala.) in an assault on the Supreme
Court's decision invalidating the AAA.

is reflected in the following extract:
from one of the letters: "There is one
wealthy Chicago woman who has
bought an old farm home which I can
see from my kitchen windows. She
is spending thousands of dollars
beautifying the old place, but she
has her cocktails served in bed, so
we will say like the old woman in
the nursery rhyme, "She is none of
I''
English Courts
Discussed By
Latest Alumnus
"The Romance of the Inns Of
Court," an article written by Albert
C. Jacobs appearing in the latest
Michigan Alumnus, relates the glor-
ious past of the institution which has
stood for the highest in the English
legal profession since the 13th cen-
tury.
Mr. Jacobs is an alumnus of Mich-
igan, also having studied at Oxford
as a Rhodes Scholar and is now an
associate profesor in Columbia Law
School.
Another article in the new Alum-
nus is entitled "Places And People"
and is Professor Robert C. Angell's
journal of some impressions received
on his European trip last summer.
His two months of European travel
were incident to his attendance at
an international meeting of Sociol-'
ogists at Brussels. The article might
be described as a series of personal
views of certain aspects of present-
day England and France. The same
issue of the Alumnus contains the
President's report and the third of
a series of articles entitled "Michigan
Calls James Burrill Angell."
A permanent Feaeral youth assist-
ance structure, on NYA and CCC
lines, is being urged on the govern-
ment.

Air Command
Over Pacific
New Program Announced
By Co Emnimons To
Create Strong Defense
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 10. - {P) --
Col. Delos C. Emmons, chief of thel
army's air groups in the Hawaiian
islands, disclosed today that under a
new procurement program the United
States would have full command of
the middle Pacific by 1938.
The army's air strength on the de-
fended island of Oahu, Col. Emmons
said, now comprises two groups of
only 104 planes, but the present
program would provide two full
wings of modern, high performance
pursuit, attack, long-range recon-
naissance andkbombardment squad-
rons.
He declined to disclose the num-
ber of planes that would be on hand
by 1938.
"By that time, however, we will
have full command ofathe middle
Pacific," the colonel said. "This
command will extend over a 1,500-
mile radius from Oahu ,with our new
high-speed, long-range reconnais-
sance and bombardment groups. I
think it equally important for proper
defense of our Pacific frontier that a
similar force be established in Alaska.
"This should have an interior base,
perhaps at Fairbanks, but more im-
portant, to my mind, is an operating
base in the Aleutian islands, at
Dutch Harbor, on Unalaksa, or on
an island as far westward as weather
conditions will permit."
CONVENTION DISCUSSED
Delta Epsilon Pi held a meeting at
8 p.m. yesterday in the Union, the
national convention in Columbus be-
ing the subject for discussion. Poly-
doros Andreou, '37E, president, pre-
sided at the meeting.

"Magnificent Obsession" the Notable Novel by
Lloyd C. Douglas, who was formerly Minister
of the Congregational Church in Ann Arbor.
Aun INSPIRATION to EN T EITAINMENT«.
No story was ever more power-;
ful, no romance ever more ONE BIG
enchanting than this emotional WE EK
masterpiece from a great author,
by a genius director, and with
an inspired cast of stars.

FOR RENT -ROOMS
DOUBLE ROOM for boys or will rent
singly. Warm, clean. Three blocks
from campus. Call 5269. 184
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gray Shaeffer pen and pencil
with initials W.F.W. on gold band.
Phone 9501. Reward. 183
NOTICES
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
DRESSMAKING - evening gowns,
suits, and coats relined. Work
guaranteed. Prices reasonable. 1208
S. University. Phone 2-2020. 178
Herrmann To SpeakI
At Episcopal Church
The Rev. Carl Christian Herrmann,
who has been a missionary of the
Methodist Episcopal Church for 27
years, will be guest preacher at the
West Side Methodist Episcopal
Church, West Jefferson and South
Fourth Streets, Sunday evening.
In the course ofnhis long service
abroad, Dr. Herrmann has acted as
principal of the Thoburn Biblical In-
stitute, in Jubbulpore, India, and as
missionary superintendent of the
Khandwa District.

IRENE UNNE aad
ROBERT TAYLOR
AO H N M. STAHL
Production ... F ar greater than his famous
"B~ack Street", than his memorable --Only'
Yesterday" or his immortal "Imitation of Lnie"
vith Charles BUTTERWORTII
BETTY F URNESS
Henry Armetra .Sara Hden . Rah Morgan
From the phenomnovel by Lloyd cg

A t U N I V ERSA LPICTUR
PRESENTED BY)
C A R L LA EM M LE

"r, '41TF, N'E

'll N Pic

TT

EXTRA -____
"MUSICAL MEMORIES"-Color Cartoon
COMING "A Tale of Two
I' GN

METRO NEWS

Cites"
Nights
at 6:50 - 9:10
All Seats 40c

LAST TIMES
TODAY

Ijj
Week-Day Matinees 2:00 - 3:30

All Seats 25c

/1 Scintillating Stage Show that combines Mirth
and Music with Variety and Originality -- pro-
. ducing an Hour of Unusual Entertainment.

Relg$ous Activities

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
at the MASONIC TEMPLE
327 South Fourth
Ministers:
William P. Lemon
. and Norman W. Kunkel
9:45 A.M. --Mr. Kunkle on "RELI-
GION AND THE RIGHT TO PER-
SONAL SUCCESS."
10:45 A.M. - Morning Worship Ser-
vice --
"THE DIVINE 'YES'"
5:30 P.M.-- Fellowship Hour and
Supper.
6:30 P.M. - Westminster Guild. Re-
ports on the Indianapolis Stu-
dent volunteers Convention by
Dick Clark, Bill Barndt, Miss Geil
Duffendack, Miss Emily Morgan,
Miss Civili Sinkanet of Siam.

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
MINISTERS-
CHARLES W. BRASHARES
and L. LaVERNE FINCH
Music Achilles Taliaferro
S45 A.M.--Morning Worship Scr-
vice:
"EINSTEIN and ETERNITY,
or
the FOURTH DIMENSION"
Dr. Brashares.
12:10 P.M. -Class at Stalker Hall.
Rev. LaVerne Finch will lead the
discussion on, "WAS JESUS RE-
LIGIOUS?"
6:00 P.M. - Wesleyan Guild. Prof.
Leroy Waterman will speak on
"'The Challenge to Christianity."
Supper and fellowship hour will
follow.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Roger Williams Guild
R. EDWARD SAYLES and
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN, Ministers
0:45 A.M. -Mr. Sayles will speak
on-

1)0 NOT
NEGLECT
YOUR RELIGIOUS
ACTIVITIES

HILLEL FOUNDATION
Corner East University and Oakland
Dr. Bernard Heller, Director
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M. - Plays at the Union,

r"I
,'Au 3m

"JONAH, THE

MOST MIS-

I

1

THE

I

i

!

I

Ill

i

III III l w aw c-lr o% nn f-*.--'11.1

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