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December 20, 1935 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-20

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E! TWO

*-- rMHT MX T X T TY --

" FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1935

I TWO 1~RTDAY, DECEMBER 20, 193w
a _________________________________________________________

Meetings Draw
Professors To
Other S'tates
Pollock, Preuss, Heneman
To Confer With Political
Scientists In Atlanta
During the Christmas Vacation
many professors will be attending
meetings of national associations and
other conferences which will be her
in various parts of the United States.
Prof. James K. Pollock, Prof. Law-
rence Preuss, Dr. Harlow J. Heneman
and Prof. Harold M. Dorr will attend
the meeting of the American Political
Science Association which will tak
place in Atlanta, Ga.
Professor Preuss will lead the ke'
discussion on "The United States and
Neutrality." Professor Pollock, a
member of the nominating commi.
tee, will read a paper on "Campaign
Tfunds and their Regulation in 1936,"
beides taking part in a discussion
on "Constittional Reform," and Dr.
ITeemran will read a paper on "Em-
ployer-Employee Relations in Italy."
Mo - T uange Group
Sevcmn fr- os will be present
at thec m 'eong of 'he Modern Lan-
guages Asociation which will be held
in Cincinn i. O. Those who will at-
tend are: Prof. H. A. Nordmeyer, Prof.
M. A. Philiprson, Prof. W. A. Reich-
ert, Prof. L. I Bredvold, Prof. O. J.
Campbell, Prof. J. R. Reinhard, Prof.
Bennett Weaver, Prof. C. D. Thorpe,
Prof. M. L. Williams, Prof. C. P. Mer-
lino, Prof. Mark Denkinger, Prof. C.
P. Waggoner, and Prof. Hugo Thieme.
From Dec. 30 to Jan. 2 H. H.
Bloomer and W. T. Halstead will be in
Chicago where the National Associa-
tion of the Teachers of Speech will
hold a conference.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman and Prof. M.
A. Copeland will attend the meeting
of the American Economics Associa-
tion which will be held Dec. 26 to 28
in New York.
Prof. C. D. LaRue, Prof. B. M.
Davis, Prof. W. R. Taylor, and Prof.
F. G. Gustafson, wlil leave for Chi-
cago and attend the conference of
the Botanical Society of America.
Geology Meeting
Prof. T. S. Lovering, Prof. G. M.
Stanley, A. J. Eardley, and R. J. Im-
lay are to be in attendance at the
Geological Society of America Con-
ference to be held in New York, and
Prof. G. B. Slosson, Dean Edward
Kraus and W. F. Hunt will attend the
meeting of the Minerological Society
of America which will be held Dec. 26
and 27.
Four men will attend the American
Academy for the Advancement of
Science meeting to be held during va-
cation in St. Louis. Those who will go
tp St. Louis are Prof. P. S. Welch,
Prof. F. E. Eggleton, Prof. A. H.
Stockard, and Prof. G. R. LaRue.
Dr. Margaret Bell will attend the
meeting of the Legislative Board of
te National Section on Women's
Athletics of the American Physical
Educational Association in New York,
and Prof. J. L. Brumm of the jour-
Palism department will go to the
meeting of the American Association
of Schools and Departments of Jour-
nalism to be held in Washington,
D. C.
The National Association of Teach-
ers of Music will meet from Dec. 27
to Jan. 3 in Philadelphia and will
be attended by Prof. Palmer Chris-
tian.
Predict Bonus
BillPassage At
Next Session

enator Byrnes, Author
Of Measure, Says It Will
Pass Even Over veto
WASHINGTON, Dec. 19. --(IP)-
Senator Byrnes (Dem., S.C.) predict-
ed today the bill he and Senator
Steiwer (Rep., Ore.) have introduced
for cash payment of the bonus in
1938 would pass at the coming ses-
sion of Congress even if vetoed by
President Roosevelt.
His prediction was made shortly
after Speaker Byrnes of the house
told reporters he believed both house
and senate would dispose of the
bonus issue by Feb. 1.
Byrnes made his statement at the
White House after explaining the
provisions of his bill to the President.
He would not say whether he thought
the measure might meet a presiden-
tial veto.
Explaining his bill to newspaper-
men, the senator said it would pro-
vide a 97 per cent cash payment im-
mediately but that veterans holding
their bonus certificates for two more
years would get the full face value.
Byrnes said he had discussed the
nmeasure with many veterans who
were satisfied with it. It made no
attempt to finance the cash payment
and thereby avoided some of the con-
troversies marking former attempts
to legislate on bonus payment.
64-Year-Old Young Lady

An Old Age Pensiwn Republican Poses

GIFT SUGGESTIONS
r --1"-W- %, 1 TT* T C' -ri °' rt 'a7T'i T1I

Classified DirectoryI
i t ~l~o I T ANJJ '7 INU

THE DAILY

Offers These Timely
Suggestions Of Ann
Arbor Merchants.
FOR HIM
LEATHER GOODS: Some with zip-I
pers. Travelling cases, bill folds,
cigar and cigarette cases, card
cases, loose leaf note books, port-
folios, brief cases, key cases, etc.
O.D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 15A.
FOR FATHER
FOUNTAIN PENS and PENCILS -
Desk bases, desk sets. Leading na-
tionally advertised makes, Parker,
Schaeffer, Waterman, Conklin,
Wahl, Eversharp, etc. Large choice
stock priced $1 and up. O. D. Mor-
rill, 314 S. State St. 16A.
ALL LEATHER GOODS, including
billfolds, toilet cases, traveling bags,
key cases and portfolios. Buy your
leather goods at a leather store.
Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St. 7A
FOR HER

FOR EVERYONE
GIVE Julie's Home Made Chocolates
to anyone who enjoys fine candies.
On sale at Eberbach & Son, Miller's
and Fenn's Drug Stores. Or call
Julie Wagner, 8142.
PERSONAL GREETING CARDS-
Printed with your name, one day
service. Large attractive assort-
ment in a complete range of prices.
O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 17A
FOR MOTHER

ga:s W. n ( h, Batte Creek, Mich., atforney, received
aro t e < atula cns from Floyd R. Moody (left), district leader of
the Townsand pension plan, upon his election to Congress in a special
election in the third Michigan district. Main, a Republican, supported
the Townsend plan in his campaign.
Metal Tb Attrt Atenion
In World Of Radio urino 1935

NEW YORK, Dec. 19.- () -Tubesi
have stepped back into the radio'
limelight.
As the year 1935, the fifteenth of
broadcasting, winds up into Decem-
ber 31, it is these receiving devices,
that gained more public attention
than any other item, unless it be tele-
vision. All because it was decided
to discard the glass casing in favor
of one of metal.
That change, hailed as marking an
advance in design and performance,
didn't meet a unanimous response in
the industry, which expected a year's
manufacture of 5,000,000 sets, the
highest on record. There was a cer-
tain amount of opinion dividing, with
one group declaring the metal tubes
were the real thing and another pro-
testing vigorously in favor of glass.
As it turned out, many manufacturers
adopted the metal tubes.
Television Progresses
Probing further into the ultra short
waves, where television is expected to
find its permanent resting place, re-
search men got ready to go right
ahead with their development of see-
See Car Crash
Prevention In{
Finger-Printing;
Safety Schools Are Also
Urged By State Delegates
At Washington .
WASHINGTON, Dec. 19, -(IP) -
Finger-printing of motorists and
safety courses in schools were under
consideration today by the accident
prevention conference.
With a pledge of President Roose-
velt's support for any adequate safety
program, representatives of 25 state
governors and spokesmen for indus-
trial, civic and agricultural interests
met yesterday for a general safety
symposium.
An active campaign against all
kinds of mishaps was planned. It
was sugested that fingerprinting
would make possible a close check on
records of drivers, and also would
serve as means of identification in
case of trouble.
The co-ordination of all agencies
concerned in sea transport was urged
as a measure to prevent accidents at
sea. Standardization of land traffic
regulations, closer cooperation among
groups interested in preventing home
accidents, and the pooling of facili-
ties of auto makers, driving clubs and
safety device manufacturers, also
were steps suggested.
The delegates heard addresses by
the president, Secretary Daniel C.
Roper, and Cary T. Grayson, chair-
man of the Red Cross.
"That we should treat with appar-
ent complacency the wholesale
slaughter of men, women and chil-
dren is disgrace to our intelligence
as a nation," said Roper.
Dr. B. L. Corbett of Milwaukee,
chairman of the committee on driver
training and law enforcement, offered
for study a proposal for compulsory
safety courses.

ing by radio. An announcement from1
the RCA laboratories said experi-
mental field tests would start some
time in 1936, in early summer or later.
The checking up process under ac-
tual broadcasting conditions was not
expected to involve any general public
introduction, but rather to be an at-
tempt at solving some more of the
problems yet to be overcome. This
announcement was based on the de-
velopment of the cathode ray tube by
Dr. Vladimir Sworykin.
Closely associated with the work in
television has been the effort to de-
velop radio facsimile, the process of
transmitting written or similar forms
of intelligence in toto. Plans were
advanced for a start toward commer-
cial existence by setting up the first
circuit between New York and Phila-
delphia.
Research In Micro-Waves
Guglielmo Marconi, the world's
wireless wizard, went further into
the research of micro-waves, mean-
while denying stories of the develop-
ment of automobile and airplane-
stopping signals mysteriously pro-
duced.
In the field of broadcasting, the
general trend of programs seemed
to show little change over past sea-
sons, although the two coast to coast
networks, NBC and CBS, looked for-
ward to a New Year's that would
find them in the $50,000,000 intake
class for the first time.
Topping the year's performances
with the microphone no doubt was
the series of two-way broadcasts to
the stratosphere.
,I,
Investigators
f Oil ealings
Short Of Funds
Need Of Money Threatens
Legislative Inquiry Into
Ethics Of Industry
LANSING, Dec. 19. --(IP)-The
legislative investigation of ethics in
the oil industry ran into a shortage
of funds today that threatened to
terminate it.
Senator Joseph A. Baldwin, chair-
man of the House-Senate committee
inquiring into charges that major oil
companies used unfair tactics to
smother competition, said only $700
remains of the original $5,000 appro-
priation.
Buell F. Jones, of Chicago, gen-
eral counsel for the Standard Oil
l Co. of Indiana, promptly questioned
whether the committee will not lose
its investigating powers when the
money runs out.
Baldwin said he thought it still
could function if it could raise some
money. He said he would "be glad"
to pay his own expenses, but could
not speak for other members. An-
other problem was who would pay for
a stenographer to transcribe testi-
mony when the last $700 is gone.
There are 1,700 pages of testimony in
the record now.

A TYPEWRITER: We have all makes.
New or reconditioned. Office and
portable machines. Priced $25 up.
Liberal terms if desired. A large
and select stock. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 18A
DIARIES, SCRAP BOOKS - Photo-
graph albums, address books, per-
sonal letter files, book ends, letter
openers, etc. A large and choice
assortment in attractive designs.
Good quality merchandise at con-
siderate prices. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 20A.
OVERNIGHT bags, pocket books,
manicure sets, every type of trav-
elling bag and make-up kit. Lea-
ther goods from a leather store are
best. Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St.
8A.
TYPEWRITER TABLES-Metal and
wood. O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State
St. 14A.
FOR SISTER: She'll love jersey pa-
jamas. They are so warm and
comfortable. Only $5.95. The
Elizabeth Dillon Shop. 46A

BOOK PLATES: A large assortment
Printed with name at small addi-
tional cost. One day service. O. D.
Morrill, 314 South State. St. 19A
CalebMilne
Released By
His Abductors
Manufacturer's Grandson
Abandoned Without Cent
Of Ransom Payment
DOYLESTOWN, Pa., Dec. 19. - (P)
-Caleb Milne, IV, held four days by
kidnapers, was abandoned by his ab-
ductors without the payment of a
I cent of the $50,000 ransom they had
demanded, the Department of Justice
said today.
The 24-year-old grandson of a
wealthy retired textile manufacturer
of Philadelphia, lured from his New
York City apartment late Saturday by
a note that said his grandfather was
ill, was found shortly before mid-
night - dazed, doped, bruised and
trussed - beside a roadside ditch near
here.
Today he was recovering in a
Doylestown hospital. Doctors said
his condition was not serious. Fed-
eral agents made no effort during the
night to question him in detail. Phys-
cians said he should be allowed to
icians said he should be allowed to
rest.
Attemptel conyact
The Philadelphia Bulletin said to-
day it was learned from a reliable
source that although no ransom was
paid, Milne's family attempted to
contact the kidnapers with $25,000
last night.
The bulletin said Warren Milne,
the kidnap victim's uncle, took the
money to the vicinity of Bow Creek,
in southwest Philadelphia. Three
Federal agents waited in hiding near-
by, but the contact was not made.
Milne was found by S. R. Gerhart,
a Philadelphia salesman, and k. Mor-
ris Urguhart, an inventor, who were
driving along the old York road about
midnight. Four youths, passing by
in another car shortly afterward, as-
sisted in getting the half-conscious
youth to Lahaska, Pa., nearby, where
he received first aid before being
brought here.
Tape Across Face
Milne's eyes and lips were sealed
with tape that criss-crossed his face.
His overcoat, pinned tightly about
him, was a straitjacket. There were
no socks on his feet, but he wore one
shoe. The bare foot was swollen. His
wrists were bound to his knees with
hemp. His right arm showed needle
marks.
One of the first things he said was:
"Don't stick those needles in me."
LaGuardia Catches

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ADVERTISING
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Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
5c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
ype.
NOTICES
MAC'S TAXI-428U. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
Lundell 11Ends
Planllt Studies
In Wa"shingf-ton

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Jade turquoise ring. Lost in
Architectural Bldg. Reward. Keep-
sake. Phone 6537. 173
LOST: White evening bag Tuesday
night near Hill Auditorium. Finder
please call 488 Jordan. Reward.
LOST: On campus one Elgin wrist
watch. Reward for return to
Charles Trumbull, 715 Oakland.
168
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Male stenographer. Part
time. Reply by letter only, giving
history and experience. Box 10.
172
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
'AMERICAN' PUZZLES BERLIN
BERLIN, Dec. 19. - (P) - A cigar
store on Unter den Linden solicits
English and American trade. The
following sign hangs in its window:
"English spoken - American under-
stood."

C. L. Lundell, assistant curator in
the University Herbarium, returned
this week from Washington where he'
spent several days studying the col-
lections in the United States Na-
tional Herbarium.
Mr. Lundell is studying the flora
of the Maya area, particularly the
Yucatan Peninsula, to determine the
species of many new plants found by
the joint expeditions of the Uni-
versity museums and the Carnegie In-
stitution.
"Many plants from the Maya area,
are proving to be of exceptional sci-
entific interest." Mr. Lundell said.
"Some apparently represent novelties,
and in order to identify and name
these, it was necessary to study types
and other rare specimens represent-
ed only in the National Herbarium.
As a result of the studies in Wash-
ington, 14 species of plants are to be
described as new to science."
While in Washington Mr. Lundell
consulted with officials of the Car-
negie Institution concerning publica-
tion of the botanical reports covering
the surveys in the Maya country.

The
COLONIAL INN
303 N. Division - 8876
LUNCHEONS - 11:30 - 1:30
DINNERS - 5:30 - 7:30
1111111
SUNDAY DINNERS 12:30 - 2:30
Reservations Now Being
Taken For
Christmas Dinners

Frank Walker
Resigns Post
As NEC Head
WASHINGTON, Dec 19. - (P) -
The resignation of Frank C. Walker
as executive director of the National
Emergency Council was announced at
the White House today, together with
the appointment of Lyle C. Alver-
son to be acting director temporarily.
The President accepted the resig-
nation with the understanding that
Walker would return to government
service as soonas his business affairs
will permit. He has been mentioned
as a possible successor to James A.
Farley as postmaster general, if and
when he withdraws from the cabinet
to devote his full time to handling
the 1936 campaign as chairman of the
Democratic national committee.
Alverson, who was appointed to
fill the position during Walker's ab-
sence, has served as solicitor of the
national emergency council since last
May. He is from New York.
OLDEST LODGE CELEBRATES
EDINBURGH, Dec. 19.- (/P) -
Elaborate celebratiosn are planned tc
mark the 200th anniversary of the
world's oldest Masonic lodgeroom
here. It is St. John's Chapel, built
in 1736 where Lodge Canongate Kil-
winning No. 2 still holds its meetings.
The charter of the Kilwinning lodge
is 258 years old.
MOST ANCIENT AUTO SURVIVES
JOHANNESBURG, S. A., Dec. 19.
- (/P) - The oldest motor car ir
Africa, a four-horsepower vehicle
made in France in 1894, and still in
"running order" has been presented
to the Johannesburg municipal mu-
seum. The solid tires are the original
omnes.

who needs
ONY
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"Loans on Your Own Signature"

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Oil

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The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.
LAST TIMES
TODAY !

2nd Floor Wolverine Bldg.
Room 208 Ph. 4000-4001
Corner Washington and Fourth

RALPH BELLAMY in

BING CROSBY

G
1
a
1
1

And Fines Driver
NEW YORK, Dec. 19. -(/P) -
Mayor Fioreflo H. LaGuardia today
fulfilled a traffic cop's dream - he sat
as magistrate to sentence a bus driver
to whom he previously had given a
ticket for a traffic violation.
The offender, John Nelson, Fifth
Avenue bus driver, passed a red light
Dec. 5. Mayor LaGuardia, en route
home in a police car, noted the of-
fense and summoned Nelson to ap-
pear before him.
Today Nelson paid a $2 fine in the
mayor's chambers where, sitting as
chief magistrate, mayor, traffic cop
and judge, LaGuardia fixed the pen-
alty.

"TWO FOR TONIGHT°" "NAVY WIFE"
TOMORROW'S THE DAY !
* BIG DOUBLE FEATURE *
A riot of laughter and entertainment
-- 1001 LAFFS
EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
YOUR NCE ULEY"
Plus
WINI SHAW
OADWAY HOST ESS"
Coning Next Wednesday
"utiny On The Bounty"

wr

PRINTING
LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, STATIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

Religious Activities

BERT
WHEELER
ROBERTL
dS

WHITNEY
THEATRE



i

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
at the MASONIC TEMPLE
327 South Fourth
Ministers:
William P. Lemnon
and Norman W. Kunkel
9:30 a.m. -- "Tidings of Joy" -
A play presented by the Tuxis
Group and directed by Mrs. Duf-
fendack and Frances Bonisteel.

*

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
MINISTERS:
CHARLES W. BRASHARES
and L. LaVERNE FINCH
Music: Achilles Taliaferro

"PEACE ON EARTH

'yl i

-I

jill! set~

Wishes You All
A MERRY

10:45 A.M.
service:

Christmas worship

GOOD WILL

"CVCB'RP1P Y"D A DIJ'

I

I

III

III Ill tVtKI~.#L/I ,

DAD T

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