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December 14, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-- THE MTT T XN !15XIT:

SATUJRDAY, DlECEMBER 14, 1935

Are Films Destined To Replace
Books?. Dr. BishopThinks Not,
Microphotography Process projection machine, a process which
Leads To CIcan be worked in any library having
a s To Conjcturing the necessary equipment. Cameras
On Future Libraries have been developed which are cap-
able of filming as many as 30 pages
By I. S. SILVERMAN a minute, illustrating that a 350-page
Will the extension of the process book can be photographed in approxi-
of microphotography into the field mately two hours.
of book publication revolutionize that However, two major difficulties en-
industry and the existing system of tailed in the process have limited its
libraries? use almost exclusively thus far among
Many optimists believe that in the libraries. The first serious difficulty
future there will be no need for print- is the matter of storage, which re-
ing books and that libraries will be- quires uniformity of humidity and
come miniature libraries of films temperature. This means, Dr. Bishop
alone. But in the opinion of Dr. Wil- explained, that a separate compart-
liam W. Bishop, University librarian, ment must be constructed to house
filming books will not do away with the films, involving great expense.
book publication, although he be- The second hindrance is that the
lieves that it is the coming means of projection devices already developed
reproducing books and will be ex- are unsatisfactory for practical pur-
tensively used. poses. They are extremely expensive,
Its use, remarked Dr. Bishop, is costing over $200 a machine. How-
spreading much more rapidly abroad ever, it was recently announced by
than in the United States. However, the documentation division of Science
services have already been estab- Service in Washington that new
lished to facilitate microphotographic mechanisms for microphotographic
duplication, such as the Bibliofilm duplication were being developed for
Service, which since November, 1934, use in libraries and elsewhere as the
has operated in the library of the result of cooperative research under
U. S. Department of Agriculture with the auspices of Science Service with
the purpose of making books and the aid of several other institutions.
records in that library. Over 300,- With the aid of this equipment it is
000 pages have been distributed by hoped that more libraries will be
this service, in many cases replacing able to have a service of their own.
interlibrary loans of books and pe- The most satisfactory process of
riodicals. reproduction now used, Dr. Bishop ex-
Microfilms are, as Dr. Bishop ex- plained, is that of enlargement from
plained, both simple to produce and films into photocopies which can be
cheap. The cost of filming one page, collected into book form. In mostI
if ten subscribers are secured, is one cases, he said, these photocopies will
cent. Many positives can be made be used in preference to other, sys-
fro-m one negative film so that the tems.

GIFT SUG4

GESTIONS
FOR HER

New

Microphones

S p plant Unwieldy
Instruments Of Old

THE DAILY
Offers These Timely
Suggestions Of Ann
Arbor Merchants.
FOR HIM
SOMETHING beautiful yet some-
thing practical! The trend for
Christmas is - luxury gifts - can
be purchased at STAEB & DAY'S,
309 S. Main. The downtown store
for Michigan men.
AN ATTRACTIVE set of leather let-
ter case, billfold and key case at
L. G. Balfour Co. 11A
TYPEWRITER TABLES-Metal and
wood. O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State
St. 14A.
SEEKERS of unusual values in gifts
for Christmas! Here you are! At
STAEB & DAY'S, 309 S. Main, the
downtown store for Michigan men.
Shirts, hosiery, pajamas, neckwear,
scarfs, etc. Come in and look
around, a pleasure to show you.
36A
LEATHER GOODS: Some with zip-
pers. Travelling cases, bill folds,
cigar and cigarette cases, card
cases, loose leaf note books, port-
folios, brief cases, key cases, etc.
O.D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 15A.
A TYPEWRITER: We have all makes.
New or reconditioned. Office and
portable machines. Priced $25 up.
Liberal terms if desired. A large
and select stock. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 18A
FOR EVERYONE
PERSONAL GREETING CARDS-
Printed with your name, one day
service. Large attractive assort-
ment in a complete range of prices.
O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 17A
SISTER pins, rings, fraternity jew-
elry, exclusive gifts; correct insignia
for all fraternities and sororities.
Burr, Patterson & Auld, 603
Church. 12A.

Radio microphones are no longer
WE SUGGEST a Coty or Evening in
Paris Toilet Set. Carlson's Phar- the big, black unwieldly instruments
macy, 1112 S. University. 34A of yesterday, Turrel Uleman, assis-
SHE'LL DEARLY LOVE a warm tant director of the University Broad-
snugly robe or pajamas of Jersey. casting Service, said yesterday.
$5.95 at the Elizabeth Dillon Shop.
37A. An entirely new microphone has
---- - --~--- - Irecently been obtained by the studio,
OVERNIGHT bags, pocket books, he said, which is much smaller and
manicure sets, every type of trav- handled with greater ease than the
elling bag and make-up kit. Lea- older ones. It has a better appear-
ther goods from a leather store are ance, too, he added, being a small,
best. Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St. screen box about an inch square and
8A. three inches in height, mounted on a
JAPANESE PAJAMAS - and CoolieItall chrome stand.I
Coat only $1.95 at Jacobson's, 612- Within this metal container, Ule-
618 East Liberty. 38A man stated, are four crystals of Ro-
chelle salts. These salts, he stated,
GLITTERING Gold Mesh Bags, have the unique quality of creating
Bracelets, and Cowls at L. G. Bal- and transmitting a small electric cur-
four Co. 10A rent when compressed. When sound
waves strike this container, the Ro-
DIARIES, SCRAP BOOKS-Photo- chelle crystals are compressed slight-
graph albums, address books, per- ly, and a small electric potential is
sonal letter files, book ends, letter built up. The electricity then trans-
openers, etc. A large and choice mits the vibrations on a wire leading
assortment in attractive designs. to an amplifier which sends the
Good quality merchandise at con- sound impulses to the outlay unit of
siderate prices. O. D. Morrill, 314 the new recording equipment recently
S. State St. 20A. installed in Morris Hall.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
NOTICES
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Student who has knowl-
edge of retail flower business for
spare time work. Phone 6215. 163
WANTED: Boy to work for room in
private family. Must have two
afternoons. Call 8476 for appoint-
ments. 164

_-

FOR MOTHER
HAND EMBROIDERED bridge sets,'
beautiful designs, elaborate hand-
work, finest linens, from $1.00 to
$2.95. B. E. Muehlig. 35A f
BOOK PLATES: A large assortment
Printed with name at small addi-
tional cost. One day service. O. D.
Morrill, 314 South State. St. 19A
GIVE an unusual gift. A pillow or
shoe tecs. Polhemus Hat Shop.
613 E. William. 6A.

i

1

The

S

PARTON

total expense is rather negligible com-
pared with the number of photocopies.
or enlargements which can be secured
and the saving in storage space.
The basic principle of filming books
is much the same as that used in
making motion pictures, Dr. Bishop
pointed out. It merely entails run-
ning a strip or roll of film repro-
ducing pages of a book through a
A Good Definition
Of News-Memory

Authority.

Forgets

When an authority on the subject
of memory forgets, well, that's news.
It all began way back in the early
days of the Republic, when a group of
homesick pilgrims invented a day of
thanksgiving, on which they could
feast on turkey and cranberry sauce,
and be mutually sympathetic over
their respective stomach-aches.
On Nov. 28 in the year 1935, a cer-
tain elementary psychology class in
the University of Michigan was
scheduled to study the field of mem-
ory, but it developed that that day
was Thanksgiving. Dr. George Mey-
ers, instructor of the class and au-
thority on memory, decided to have a
makeup section in the subject on the
afternoon of the following Saturday,
in order to maintain the regular
schedule. Per agreement, the stu-
dents assembled in the classroom on
Saturday afternoon and waited for
the instructor to appear. He never
showed up. He had failed to remem-
ber an appointment for a lecture on
memory.
Is it any wonder then, that on the
following Tuesday, when the class
belatedly buckled down to the study,
of memory, Dr. Meyers seemed a bit
reluctant to give any positive prin-
ciples or laws as to the most efficient
way to remember. All he had to say
about the whole affair was, "Oh, the
irony of it all."

Prof. Bredvold
Talks Over Air
On Literature
Faculty Member Discusses
And Interprets Writings
Of 18th Century
"Eighteenth Century Literature"
was the topic of a lecture given yes-
terday by Professor Louis I. Bredvold
of the English department over the
University Broadcasting Service.
Explaining first that in order to
understand history we must not only
know what man was but what he
wanted and tried to be, Professor
Bredvold declared the eighteenth cen-
tury can be understood best by know-
ing what its ideals were.
"The ideals of that period were
in many respects very different from
those of our own." He said that
these were composed of desires for
beauty, perfection, and elegance. The
custom of men wearing wigs, silver
buckles on the shoes, a suit of peach-
colored velvet, and lace display well
the elaborateness of the age, he con-
tinued. The manners. too, were quite
gracious and elaborate, as seen in the
novels of Jane Austen, Professor
Bredvold sid.
The furniture and the architecture,
the colonial architecture widely im-
itated in our modern buildings, which
is concerned "with the perfection and
symmetry of design, in the most ex-
quisite and pleasing proportions, in
beauty of geometrical purity," as il-
lustrations of the taste of the eigh-
teenth century, the speaker =com-
mented.
Professor Bredvold illustrated these
ideals from the literature of the pe-
riod, in which be believes is "the
same desire for beauty, for perfection,
and for elegance."

Welfare Bureau's
Work Described
(Continued on Page 2)
agencies is duplicated because they
believe the system of distributing the
case loads is haphazardly arranged,"
Miss Valentine said, "but this year we
have established a clearing bureau at
the Salvation Army quarters in order
to avoid this overlapping of work."
Before taking over any case, the wel-
fare agencies in the city call the bu-
reau, which has records of the case
loads of each organization to find out
if the particular family is being cared
for by some other agency.
Financial guidance is one of the
services rendered by the Bureau, Miss
Valentine said. In many cases where
the father gets a job after having
been unemployed for a long time, the
family sometimes will spend his sal-
ary on needless luxuries, without real-
izing that they must have money for
- 1

FOUNTAIN PENS and PENCILS -
Desk bases, desk sets. Leading na-
tionally advertised makes, Parker,
Schaeffer, Waterman, Conklin,
Wahl, Eversharp, etc. Large choice
stock priced $1 and up. 0. D. Mor-
ril, 314 S. State St. 16A.
ALL LEATHER GOODS, including
billfolds, toilet cases, traveling bags,
key cases and portfolios. Buy your
leather goods at a leather store.
Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St. 7A
the necessities of life. "We try to
help them by drawing up budgets, or
by giving them advice as to how they
can best manage on what they have,"
she stated, "although we do not force
them to follow our advice."
However, although service is the
primary aim of the Bureau, it is
coupled with financial aid. The Bu-
reau receives $9,000 a year from the
Community Fund with which its work
can be carried on.
U.,1

L

L

1

"NOCT URN E"
A Sparton Creation that is Different!
ON DISPLAY AT
Purchase Radio Service

FOR FATHER

Phone 8696

331 South Main

One of Our
CHRISTMAS
1SAVING CLUBS
Will Help Towards
Making Your 1936 a Success
Come in today and ask our advice as to the system
of savings that will be easiest for you to carry out!
START NOW!
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Northwest Corner Main and Huron Streets
Branch: 707 NORTH UNIVERSITY

SAVE 20%
Oat
WATCH ES
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.

TODAY - Meet the
100 HOSTESSES
SOPH CABARET

I

k.r ;r.:..i-.s N - _ ....fir .. .. ca:i i' h .rl

iii

I

II

of

I

STAG DANCING
TODAY
SOPH CABARET
MICHIGAN
MID-WEST
PREMIERE SHOWING

y: ii' '

II

1 11

2 P.M. Sunday .,. . .. . .... 25c
MAJESTIC Saturday Evening & Sunday,
All Seats ............. ".. 35c
Sat. Mat. 2 & 3:30, Eve. 7 & 9
TODAY! A SUPERB SCREEN OFFERING
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!
FIlF TH H E N UE E XP O SED!1
the daring revelations of what goes on behind the
drawn curtains of Fifth Avenue's mansions. What
sacrifices are made in the name of SPLENDOR,
c:
Four
BIG
- V
Visog SAMUEL GODWYN
tintrigva behind P R E 5 E N T 5
--In
JhLRAwAt AAAy
Continngthe Somuel Goidwy rdto ;mg
ni~en at nct hs ain.damtc aeswELMcCREA - PAUL CAVANAGH

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
at the MASONIC TMPLE
327 South Fourth
Ministers:
William P. Lemon
and Norman W. Kunkel
):45 - Westminster Student Forum.
"What Do We Mean By God?"
Dr. Lemon, leader.
L 0:45 - Dr. Lemon preaches:
"THE GOSPEL OF
FOLLOW-SHIP"
3:30 -Westminster Student Guild.
"Christmas in Song and Story."
The usual fellowship hour at 5:30
with cost supper.

"Religion in a
Changing World"
UNION
BALLROOM
December 15
8 P.M.

RABBI

Religious Activities

SILVER

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
MINISTERS:
CHARLES W.BRASHARES
and L. LaVERNE FINCH
Music: Achilles Taliaferro
10:45 a.m. - Morning Worship Ser-
v'ice.
"GOD BEFORE
CHRISTMAS"
Dr. Brashares
12:00 Noon - Class at Stalker Hall
on -
"The Social Responsibility
Of A Christian"
led by Prof. Lowell J. Carr.
6:00 p.m. --Wesleyan Guild at
Stalker Hall. Kappa Phi, Meth-
odist University Girls' organiza-
tion will have charge of the pro-
gram. Prof. R. D. T. Hollister
of the Speech Department will
read a Christmas story. Supper
and fellowship hour follow.

1II

ALI

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:4

1111,

DARRYL F. ZANUCK
20th CENTURY PRODUCTION

1

Presented by Joseph M. Schenck
with
ROCHELLE HUDSONI
(ICAD DfhrAEDtfDDhIfCfADAT

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Roger Williams Guild
R. EDWARD SAYLES and
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN, Ministers
10: -
"EZEKIEL, THE PRIEST
PROPHET"

0 N 1T
N EGLECTI

HILLEL FOUNDATION
Corner East University and Oakland
Dr. Bernard Heller, Director
10:00 aan . Sunday School
8:00 p.m. --Sunday evening-An
address will be given by Rabbi

Al

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