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December 11, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TW

TI1 THEIT 71-1JTrY

,WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1935

Burke Moves
For Dismissal
Of Cohen Suit
Attorney's Interpretation
Of University's Position
Is Given
(Continued from Page 1)
would find themselves continually
annoyed and embarrassed by the
activities of small groups concerned
with matters of personal vanity and
a desire to obtain some inexpensive
publicity.
"Of the four students who were
asked in July of this year not to re-
enter the University, one has since
shown his willingness to comply with
the rules and regulations, and has
been accordingly readmitted. The
other three, including the one in
whose name the present action is
brought, have been given every op-
portunity to present their case. How-
ever, their actions and their state-
nents to the administration have
made it clear that they have no in-
tention of conducting themselves as
orderly citizens of the University if
udmitted, and it has therefore been
deemed to the best interests of the
University and of the student body
as a whole that their request for ad-
inssion be denied.
"In the final analysis, in a con-
troversy between the officials of the
University and an individual or group
of individuals as to the manner in
which the University shall be oper-
ated, sound judgment will probably
dictate that the authorities have the
final word. By any other arrange-
; ie'nt, confusion, lack of discipline
and inferior work would result. Pre-
sumably, if another form of Univer-
sity government were to be substi-
tuted for the present method it would
still involve the exercise of a degree
of authority on the part of someone.
Whatever form such control might
take it would still probably fail to
satisfy, some who find it difficult to
adjust their personal activities to any
idea of discipline."
A hearing on the motion has been
asked for Monday, Dec. 16.
Colorful Gargoyle
With New Make-Up
On Sale Tomorrow
Emphasizing color, unique make-
up and clever photography, Decem-
ber's Gargoyle comes out tomorrow.
It is to be a Christmas issue, accord-
ing to Gilbert Tilles, '36, assistant ed-
itor, and the cover will convey the
yuletide spirit in a manner similar to
last December's Gargoyle. This same
spirit will be furthered by the liberal
use of color and two pages of gift sug-
gestions.
The same theme is also advanced
by a page of candid camera pictures
showing mistletoe couples, in which
the individuals photographed togeth-
er are particularly interested in each
other. The candid camera has pro-
vided another unusual feature in the
new Gargoyle with snaps of "class
sleepers," those folks who are prone
to doze off in lectures.
For the first time, "Preposterous
People" takes a cut at the fairer sex
and the victim, needless to say, is a
campus luminary. Sophisticated
Lady shows some campus women
modeling formal clothes appropriate
for the holiday season.
Beside these special Christmas at-
tractions, the Gargoyle will continue
the features it has carried during the
fall, including "On The Record," a
column of comment on modern mu-

sic, "Going Places," this month de-
voted to the bright spots in Detroit,
and the customary cartoons and hu-
mor.
Farmer Convicted
On Assault Charge
Mike Fofofonoff, 55 year old
farmer, who was arrested by sheriff's
officers two months ago when he
swung an axe at his friend, John
Ferrto, in the course of a "little argu-
ment" in a shack in Augusta town-
ship in the southeast corner of Wash-
tenaw County, was found guilty of
assault today by a circuit court jury.
Fofofonoff was charged specifically
with "assault with intention to com-
mit great bodily harm, less than the
crime of murder." Circuit Court
Justice George W. Sample will prob-
ably sentence Fofofonoff Monday.

Roosevelt Defends Agricultural Policy

GIFT SUGGESTiONS

Classified Directory

THE DAILY
Offers These Tim ely
Suggestions Of Ann
Arbor Merchants.

7

FOR HER

-Associated Press Photo.
Delegates to the American Farm Bureau Federation convention
in Chicago heard President Roosevelt declare that "political profiteers"
are seeking to stir up city people in opposition to the New Deal farm
program, which he asserted was responsible for a $3,000,000,000 increase
in farm income. Directly behind him is shown his agriculture secretary,
Henry Wallace.
Criticisms Of Government Relief
Are Offered By Social Workers

Hopkins' Assistant Told
WPA Wages Result In
Real Suffering
By ARTHUR A. MILLER
Definite and enumerated criticisms
of the present government relief pro-
gram and suggestions for a revision
of the relief structure were expressed
to Aubrey Williams, assistant to Har-
ry L. Hopkins, Federal Relief Ad-
ministrator, by 50 delegates assembled,
in Washington under the national
coordinating committee of rank and
file social workers, it was stated by
Milton Kemnitz, chairman of theJ
Michigan coordinating committee, in
an interview yesterday.
According to Mr. Kemnitz, the
committee in Washington told Mr.
Williams that drastic curtailment of
relief is taking place, and that real
suffering is arising from the policy of
forcing the unemployed to acecpt
without supplement the WPA wages
which are often below the amount
formrly needed to maintain a family
on direct relief.
The committee also advised Mr.
Williams that new cases are not be-
ing certified for work, but are being
shunted with the unemployables on-
to the local governments, whose funds
will be unable to care for them. As
evidence of the situation, the com-
mittee reported that transients are
being forced to bread-lines and
"jungles" in Georgia, South Dakota,
Alabama and other states where Fed-
eral funds have already been cut off.
The suggestions made by the com-
mittee were: "That the Federal Gov-
ernment continue funds for relief to
the states: that responsibility for
the transient program originally
planned be resumed by the Federal
Government: that a Federal De-
partment of Social Welfare be devel-
oped, financed by regular appropria-
tions through a taxation program on
higher incomes and corporation prof-
its; that a genuine system of social
insurance be established: and that
funds for the supplementation of low
standard wages and for relief when
the wage earner is absented from
work because of illness, accident or
labor dispute be continued."
Mr. Williams said, in answer, that
the present plan was not adequately

caring for employables and will not
care for unemployables. He asserted,
however, that the government is
definitely going to discontinue the
direct relief program. He agreed
that measures might have tobe taken
to care for transients reported suf-
fering by social workers from Balti-
more, Philadelphia and other cities.
The main criticisms by the social
workers were that "The work relief
program is too closely associated with
regular relief administrations, that
relief wages are destroying existing
levels and that relief workers are be-
ing employed on projects of military
natures. They also complained that
the present structure, hopelessly en-
tangled in red tape, does not provide
sufficiently diversified projects to
meet the needs of various types of
unemployed and is erroneously based
on the assumption that unemploy-
ment is a passing phenomenon."
Corrective measures which the so-
cial workers included in their pro-
posed long-time relief plan were : no
discrimination because of race, po-
litical beliefs or color; wages equal
to the prevailing hourly wage or trade
union pay; employment to all em-
ployables irrespective of ability to
meet needs test; no jobs of military
nature; a projected relief workers'
organization including provisions to
permit collective bargaining; and the
prohibition of use of relief labor by
private firms.
Mr. Williams denied there could be
discrimination because of race or po-
litical belief and promised to take up
the cases which social workers might
send him. He expressed the opinion
that the proposed program is desir-
able but not feasible, because of pres-
sure which would be brought by "fel-
lows on the other side of the fence."
As the third general point on their
program, the social workers advised
Mr. Williams of the position of the
social worker. They cited the fact
that many agencies were under-
manned because of cuts in Federal
funds.

GLITTERING Gold Mesh Bags,
Bracelets, and Cowls at L. G. Bal-
four Co. 10A
OVERNIGHT bags, pocket books,
manicure sets, every type of trav-
elling bag and make-up kit. Lea-
ther goods from a leather store are
best. Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St.
8A.
McLEAN'S CHOCOLATES, 4 pound
box at $1.00. Bunte's French Mix-
ture, 2'2 pound box at $1.25. B. E.
Muehlig, 216 S. Main. 21A.
A TYPEWRITER: We have all makes.
New or reconditioned. Office and
portable machines. Priced $25 up.
Liberal terms if desired. A large
and select stock. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 18A
BOOK PLATES: A large assortment.
Printed with name at small addi-
tional cost. One day service. O. D.,
Morrill, 314 South State. St. 19A
DIARIES, SCRAP BOOKS --Photo-
graph albums, address books, per-
sonal letter files, book ends, letter
openers, etc. A large and choice
assortment in attractive designs.
Good quality merchandise at con-
siderate prices. . D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 20A.
HOSIERY, scarfs, handbags, flowers
make ideal gift suggestions at Rob-
ert's Shop, 604 E. Liberty.
ARTCRAFT HOSIERY makes the
perfect gift. Boxes of 3 pairs at
$2.75 and $3.85. Elizabeth Dillon
Shop. 4A
WE SUGGEST Coty's Haubigant's
and Yardley's perfume sets. Haus-
man's Pharmacy. 601 E. Liberty.
2A.
GIVE an unusual gift. A pillow or
shoe tecs. Polhemus Hat Shop.
613 E. William. 6A.
COMPACTS - A complete collection,
singles, doubles, triples, loose pow-
der. In silver, gold, cloisonne, some
with pepete point inserts; cigarette
cases and combination lighters and
cases, 59c to $3.95. Jacobson's,
612-618 East Liberty 13A.
GLITTERING gold mesh in bags,
Bracelets and Cowls at L. G. Bal-
four Co., 1107 S. University. 10A
FOR EVERYONE
SISTER pins, rings, fraternity jew-
elry, exclusive gifts; correct insignia
for all fraternities and sororities.
Burr, Patterson & Auld, 603
Church. 12A.
PERSONAL GREETING CARDS -
Printed with your name, one day
service. Large attractive assort-
ment in a complete range of prices.
O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 17A
FOR MOTHER
SHEET SETS - One Damascus sheet
white, two rows of hemstitching,
size 81 by 99 with two cases at
$3.75. B. E. Muehlig, 126 S. Main.
24A

OR HM
FOUNTAIN PENS and PENCILS--
Desk bases, desk sets. Leading na-
tionally advertised makes, Parker,
Schaeffer. Watemn, Conklin,
Wahl, Eversharp, etc. Large choice
stock piiced $1 and up. O. I 11or-
rill, 314 S. State St. 15A.
LEATHER GOODS: Some with zip-
pers. Travelling cases, bill folds.
cigar and cigarette cases, card
cases, loose leaf note books, port-
folios, brief cases, key cases, etc.
O.D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 15A.
TYPEWRITER TABLES-Metal and
wood. O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State
St. 14A.
STAEB AND DAY at 309 S. Main,
the downtown store for Michigan
men, presents luxurious ties at
$1.00 and $1.50 in beautiful Christ-
mas boxes. 22A.
ALL LEATHER GOODS, including
billfolds, toilet cases, traveling bags,
key cases and portfolioss. Buy your
leather goods at a leather store.
Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St. 7A

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214
The classified columns close at five
Yc'ock previous to day of insertion.
ca numbers may be secured at ne
?Xstra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for threenor more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
relephone rate --15c per reading line
for two or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
101,, discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month .........................8e
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.....,.Bc
2 lines daily, college year ...,.....7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months...........c
100 lines used as desired..........9c
300 lines used asdesired.........c
1,000 lines used as desired ...,......7c
2,000 lines used as desired ........6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
:yc per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face,upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to abcove rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 71 point
Uype.
LAUNDRY

A PHILCO
From Dick Radio Co.
327 S. Main Dial

7991
9A

STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. fx
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x

AN ATTRACTIVE set of leather let-
9n-+ n.o 1,;tl~ 1- - - --bo n~n '

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: White gold Waltham wrist
watch. Call 2-3281. Virginia W.
Wagner. 159
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Silver link bracelet of senti-
mental value between Union Ball-
room and Hut Saturday night.
Phone 9540.
Today and Thursday
Greta Garbo
"ANNA KARENINA"
BURNS and ALLEN
"HERE COMES COOKIE"
Friday and Saturday
WALTER KELLY
"VIRGINIA. JUDGE"
GAIL PATRICK
"Wanderer of the Wasteland"
"Roaring West" Chapter 2

ter case, bilfoicd and key case at
L. G. Balfour Co. 11A CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
FOR FATHER to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
COMPLETE line of smoking items - 2-3640. lox
toilet articles, including famous
Schick Dry Shaver. Carlson's Pha r-NOTICES
macy, 1112 S. University. 1A
_____________________ IMAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our elf-
WE WRAP and mail boxes of Christ- cient service. All new cabs. 3x
mas cigars. Housman's Pharmacy,
601 E. Liberty. 3A M ca
OUR NEW NOW
LAST TIMES
L (' A N TODAY
MATINEES . . 25c
L N NIGHTS . 25c - 35c
GET UP TO $300
JUST ON YOUR
SIGNATURE.... <
The fact that you have a
steady job with a well estab-
lished firm gives you agood'
credit standing with usl Make y
use of itl Let us advance you
the cash you need NOW.
ALL THE TIME YOU
NEED TO REPAY!
We have 6 other loan plans
for single and married people
that allow as long as 20 months.
P E R S 0"h -s ugA
FINANCE COMPANY Friday Ni
Second Floor - Wolverine Bldg. AMATE
Room 208 Phone 4000-4001
Cor. Washington & 4th SHO'J
M vl

011
WATCH ES
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.
Read The Want Ads

i

SAVE 20%

15c to 6 -25c After 6
Now
Edward Everett Horton
"His Night Out"
-with-
Irene Hervey
And
Paul Muni
"Black Fury"~
Extra

-k

U

m
II

I

3i . --

°-A

6

100 HOSTESSES
AS TRAVELERS' AIDS
SOPH CABARET
(See Page 3)

Musical
Comedy

Latest
News

'I

PRINTING

11

. _.._ _ _ ____ __.iI
Y

Don' tRead
This Ad!
THE GARGOYLE WILL
BE HERE TOMORROW!
DON'T FORGET T HE
CH RIST MAS OF E R

LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, STATIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

ANOTHER JOY MONTH
MAJ EST ICATTRACTION
Matinee 2 & 3:30 - Evening 7 d
- NOW! - DOUBLE FEATURE
I A Troublesome Man 1I

YPSILANTINORMAL CHOIR
SINGING UNACCOMPANIED 200 SINGERS
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
CHRKISTMAS MUSIC
Nativity Music from Many Lands Old Music -Young Voices
% PEASE AUDITORIUM, Ypsilanti Thurs., Dec. 12, 8 P.M. Exactly
NO RESERVED SEATS ADMISSION - 25c
THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION presents
The Distinguished Author of "BISMARK," "HINDERBURG,"
"GOETHE," "NAPOLEON" and Other Works.
EMIL LUDWIG

But a Lovable Ghost!
L N E L
na uNvu
avi O1F l
huh ~LDb

1.

I

David Belasco's great stage
success . . . an RKO.
RADIO PICTURE
i With
HELEN MACK
EDWARD ELLIS
DONALD MEEK
PLUS

7 MONT s) Gargoyle
$1, Life

A

NOTED GERMAN BIOGRAPHER

r;'

Speaking on "THE FATE OF EUROPE 1914-194)"

Si

G

w r

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